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Joy dishes the arts grants

By johnboy 11 December 2013 23

Joy Burch is playing Santa to arts organisations with our money:

“I am pleased the ACT Government continues to provide strong access to, and participation in, the arts for our community through the ACT Arts Fund,” Ms Burch said.

“The 2014 funding will support a broad range of programs and projects by arts organisations, individual artists, collectives and community groups. This funding will ensure strong artistic development across the arts in the ACT.”

The 2014 ACT Arts Fund comprises three categories, with $670,000 allocated to Project Funding, $480,500 for Program Funding and $650,000 to Key Arts Organisations.

Project Funding – $670,000

A contemporary Canberra band, a community dance project and a group of visual artists are amongst the 42 successful applicants for project funding.

“Among a diverse mix of arts projects, local contemporary band Super Best Friends will be supported in 2014 to produce a debut full-length rock recording,” Ms Burch said.

“Another recipient is Canberra Dance Theatre, who will develop new dance works for teens with special needs and for people over 55, as well as producing a short film.”

Other projects include the development of a non-fiction comic book featuring themes around environmental sustainability and economics; a ‘zine vending machine which will feature the work of local ‘zine-makers; an exhibition featuring the work of six visual artists and a musician who have had residencies in the Tanami Desert.

Program Funding – $480,500

Eight ACT arts organisations including ArtSound FM, Australian National Capital Artists, Canberra City Band, Canberra International Film Festival, M16 Artspace, Pro Musica (Canberra International Music Festival), Strathnairn Arts Association and the You Are Here festival were successful in receiving Program Funding.

“Program Funding supports arts organisations that provide important programs of activity enabling the ACT community to have access to and engagement with the arts,” Ms Burch said.

“Strathnairn Arts Association will receive a significant increase in funding to assist it to achieve the full potential of the Strathnairn Arts Centre as a national centre for access and excellence in visual arts, as part of the government’s priority to further development ACT arts hubs.”

Key Arts Organisations – $650,000

Four ACT arts organisations, the Canberra Potters’ Society, Canberra Youth Music, Music For Everyone and QL2 Dance were successful in receiving funding for up to five years.

“Key Arts Organisations have clearly defined roles in the ACT arts sector and significant levels of achievement in supporting, developing and advancing the arts,” Ms Burch said.

“In response to the Government’s priority to further development ACT arts hubs, the Canberra Potters’ Society will receive a significant increase in funding to assist it to achieve the full potential of the Watson Arts Centre as a national centre for access and excellence in ceramics.”

“Funding to Canberra Youth Music and Music For Everyone will support the continued development of the Ainslie Arts Centre as vibrant music hub with a focus on youth music.”


UPDATE: The full list of recipients is now up.

    Project Funding

    — ACT Disability, Aged and Carer Advocacy Service: $19,848 to assist with costs of producing digital stories by people with a disability

    — Art Monthly Australia Ltd: $10,000 to assist with costs of publishing the work of ACT-based arts writers/critics and artists

    — Asialink, University of Melbourne: $20,000 to assist with costs of Asialink Arts Residencies for ACT artists

    — Atfield, David: $39,500 to assist with costs of staging a theatre production at The Street Theatre

    — Australian Book Review Inc: 12,000 to assist with costs of ACT writers creating new literary work

    — Batchelor, James: $16,500 to assist with costs of developing and presenting a dance performance

    — Bradley, Karen: $34,452 to assist with costs of staging a musical theatre production

    — Brass Knuckle Brass Band: $8,490 to assist with costs of workshopping and recording new compositions of contemporary funk-based brass music

    — Canberra Choral Society: $33,146 to assist with costs of the ‘Come and Sing’ program

    — Canberra Dance Theatre: $16,720 to assist with costs of producing new dances with CDT GOLD and CDTeens

    — CanberraZine Emporium: $3,999 to assist with costs of managing a vending machine for ‘Zines’

    — Clay, J.T.: $7,775 to assist with costs of editing a time-travel novel

    — Day, Michelle: $2,922 to assist with costs of creating a new body of sculptural work

    — del Castillo, Mariana: $6,578 to assist with costs of neon signs as part of an exhibition

    — Delves, Maxine: $8,760 to assist with costs of creative development of a physical theatre/circus performance

    — Greenaway, Sally: $5,623 to assist with costs of a CD of classical compositions

    — Groundrush Six: $23,000 to assist with costs of an exhibition and catalogue from a residency at the Tanami Gold Mine

    — Hagerty, Catherine and Heidi Silberman: $25,000 to assist with costs a theatre production about the lives of women in Australia during World War I

    — Hammer, Chris: $6,168.00 to assist with costs of researching and developing a novel set in Canberra

    — Jerjen, Rafael: $14,358 to assist with costs of recording an album of original jazz compositions

    — Kochel, Jay: $11,267 to assist with the costs of a new body of artwork involving scent and odour

    — Lallemand, Blaide & Michael Norris: $9,700 to assist with costs of research and development of an interactive sound installation

    — Larsson, Adelina: $21,598 to assist with costs of a choreographic development and performance for professional dance artists

    — Lorrimer, Dan: $10,877 to assist with costs of developing and exhibiting new sculptural work

    — Mason, Sarah: $7,700 to assist with costs of developing a family memoir manuscript

    — McCarthy, Cadi: $39,900 to assist with costs of the creative development of a new dance theatre work

    — McMillen, Stuart: $9,720 to assist with the costs of drawing a non-fiction comic book

    — Molonglo Group Cultural Fund: $25,638 to assist with costs of artists fees for community-focused, multi-arts festival ‘Art not Apart’

    — National Folk Festival: $34,000 to assist with costs of presenting ACT performing artists at the National Folk Festival

    — Page, Geoff: $3,725 to assist with costs of presenting poetry readings at the Gods Cafe

    — Parker, Jemima: $6,435 to assist with the costs of creating a new body of work for a solo exhibition at the Belconnen Arts Centre

    — Patrick, Tanya: $13,420 to assist with costs of research and writing a non-fiction children’s book

    — Petocz, Catherine: $35,000 to assist with costs of producing and presenting a theatre production

    — Porter, Phoebe: $9,950 to assist with costs of creating contemporary jewellery for exhibition

    — Sharrock, Jim: $4,500 to assist with costs of developing a music production for schools

    — SoundOut: $30,817 to assist with the costs of staging the SoundOut improvisational and experimental music festival

    — Stubbs, Ben: $10,000 to assist with costs of researching a travel book
    Super Best Friends: $9,817 to assist with the costs of producing a full length debut rock recording

    — Westwood, Kim: $13,646 to assist with costs of writing, researching and editing a novel

    — Tait, Melanie: $11,800 to assist with costs of completing and editing a book of fiction

    — The Griffyn Ensemble: $16,800 to assist with costs of developing musical performances

    — Todo, Kensuke: $20,655 to assist with costs of a solo exhibition of steel sculptures at Drill Hall Gallery ANU

    Program Funding

    — Australian National Capital Artists Inc: $40,000 in 2014 and 2015 to assist with costs of delivering the ANCA gallery program

    — Arts Sound FM: $67,000 for 2014 and 2015 to assist with costs of delivering arts programs at the station

    — Canberra City Band Inc: $21,500 in 2014 to assist with costs of delivering band music programs

    — Canberra International Film Festival Inc: $45,000 in 2014 and 2015 to assist with costs of staging the Canberra International Film Festival

    — M16 Artspace Inc: $70,000 in 2014 and $40,000 in 2015 to assist with costs of delivering the M16 gallery program

    — Pro Musica Inc: $77,000 in 2014 and 2015 to assist with costs of staging the Canberra International Music Festival

    — Strathnairn Arts Association Inc: $100,000 in 2014 and 2015 to assist with costs of managing the Strathnairn Arts Centre and deliver visual arts programs

    — You Are Here Inc: $60,000 in 2014 and 2015 to assist with costs of staging the You Are Here festival

    Key Arts Organisation Funding

    — Canberra Potters’ Society Inc: $100,000 in 2014 to assist with costs of managing the Watson Arts Centre and deliver ceramic programs

    — Canberra Youth Music Inc and Music for Everyone Inc: $250,000 in 2014 to assist with costs of delivering music programs at the Ainslie Arts Centre

    — QL2 Dance Inc: $300,000 per year for 2014 to 2018 to assist with costs of delivering youth dance programs

What’s Your opinion?


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Joy dishes the arts grants
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simsim 8:24 pm 12 Dec 13

A_Cog said :

poetix said :


No-one is saying that hospitals don’t matter…

No, instead you’re saying that arts funding is more important / worthy than more cops / teachers / counsellors / child protection workers etc.

Bad teenage heartbreak poetry exists without government funding. Garage rock bands too. The human drive for [recognition / self-expression / praise / attention] pushes people to [dance / sing / write / paint / sculpt].

It doesn’t need to be subsidised with government money, especially when every spending decision by government is another decision to not spend money on another policy area.

housebound said :

The value of art is that it reflects back to us less creative types the nature of the society we live in. It gives us a different window through which to view our world.

Government spending on art shows the values we have as a society. We do not value doing EVERYTHING WE CAN to help people get good educations, help them into jobs, help people suffering mental/substance issues, protecting children, caring for the sick or aged, help small business grow…

No, we [actually, you] value putting millions of dollars (and this small $1.8m is a fraction of what the ACT spends on alleged ‘art’ – the Skywhale is another example) into something which provides passing pleasure to 1% of the population, an effete elite, while the growing underclass consistently get stuck there and ignored because instead, we’re all looking at these bright, shiny baubles, which you just LOVE!

For what it’s worth … far more than 1% of the population participate in the arts, and engage actively in creation, in viewing, and in participating. And very few of these are effete, elite or particularly tied to economic status in any way. Australia council stats state over 90% of australians engage in the arts on an annual basis. I’m sorry you’re apparently in a minority.

Only 44% of households have kids in them of any age. Does that make education funding by its nature discriminatory against the 56% who don’t? Of course not.

For a lot of people, the bells and whistles and shiny baubles are the reason to live. We aren’t just economic units, and we aren’t just bodies to be repaired and punished and shoved around. We need something more.

knuckles 12:57 pm 12 Dec 13

What!
The government is giving away money so people can spend more time on their hobbies?
How do I get on to that?

A_Cog 12:38 pm 12 Dec 13

poetix said :


No-one is saying that hospitals don’t matter…

No, instead you’re saying that arts funding is more important / worthy than more cops / teachers / counsellors / child protection workers etc.

Bad teenage heartbreak poetry exists without government funding. Garage rock bands too. The human drive for [recognition / self-expression / praise / attention] pushes people to [dance / sing / write / paint / sculpt].

It doesn’t need to be subsidised with government money, especially when every spending decision by government is another decision to not spend money on another policy area.

housebound said :

The value of art is that it reflects back to us less creative types the nature of the society we live in. It gives us a different window through which to view our world.

Government spending on art shows the values we have as a society. We do not value doing EVERYTHING WE CAN to help people get good educations, help them into jobs, help people suffering mental/substance issues, protecting children, caring for the sick or aged, help small business grow…

No, we [actually, you] value putting millions of dollars (and this small $1.8m is a fraction of what the ACT spends on alleged ‘art’ – the Skywhale is another example) into something which provides passing pleasure to 1% of the population, an effete elite, while the growing underclass consistently get stuck there and ignored because instead, we’re all looking at these bright, shiny baubles, which you just LOVE!

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