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Katy to bribe the schools to stop selling soft drinks

By johnboy - 27 August 2012 40

Katy Gallagher is promising to offer schools a teeny weeny little bribe in exchange for giving up the ongoing revenues of selling soft drinks to their students:

If re-elected in 2012 ACT Labor will establish a $500,000 fund
to install water bottle refill stations and supply reusable drink bottles to any school that agrees to end the sale of sugary drinks in their school.

Our aim is to completely phase out sugary drinks in ACT primary schools within five years and improve the health of all children.

Government and non-government schools, whether it be primary school, high school or college will be eligible to apply for funding of up to $15,000 to install up to 2 water refill stations and supply re-usable water bottles for each student.

The aim is to phase out the sale of all sugary drinks (like soft drinks, flavoured milk, juices and slushies) in all primary schools by the end of 2017.

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40 Responses to
Katy to bribe the schools to stop selling soft drinks
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Jim Jones 9:27 am 29 Aug 12

Dacquiri said :

This is, unfortunately, another example of a well-meaning but poorly thought-out solution to an important and difficult problem. And another example of the ‘living in a vacuum’ complex that plagues Canberra decision-makers. How about looking at what’s worked well elsewhere? I am thinking in particular about the approach adopted by some places overseas whereby no specific foods or drinks are prohibited, but requirements are laid down for the nutritional content of anything provided in the schools (including in vending machines). This has prompted the manufacturers to look seriously at the junk they’re pumping out and to reformulated these foods to increase their nutritional value by, for example, reducing the amount of fat, salt and sugar. Wouldn’t that have been a much more satisfactory way of going about things, especially if adopted at a national level?

Very nice. Sounds like a great idea. Got any links to implementation elsewhere? I’m keen to check it out.

bundah 8:54 am 29 Aug 12

Dacquiri said :

This is, unfortunately, another example of a well-meaning but poorly thought-out solution to an important and difficult problem. And another example of the ‘living in a vacuum’ complex that plagues Canberra decision-makers. How about looking at what’s worked well elsewhere? I am thinking in particular about the approach adopted by some places overseas whereby no specific foods or drinks are prohibited, but requirements are laid down for the nutritional content of anything provided in the schools (including in vending machines). This has prompted the manufacturers to look seriously at the junk they’re pumping out and to reformulated these foods to increase their nutritional value by, for example, reducing the amount of fat, salt and sugar. Wouldn’t that have been a much more satisfactory way of going about things, especially if adopted at a national level?

Therein lies the problem ie. there ain’t much oxygen in that there vacuum!

Gerry-Built 8:29 am 29 Aug 12

An encouragement*…

Gerry-Built 7:46 am 29 Aug 12

johnboy said :

We’re talking about kids. How many lost bottles will need replacing every day?

Especially in the new weakling culture where no living being can endure without a swing on the water bottle every five seconds.

In the decade I have been a teacher, there has always been encouragement to bring a water bottle, especially through the Summer months. This is especially important in some schools that lack climate control; or lack working climate control, where temps skirt upper 30s. In encouragement to bring in water bottles is no new thing. The common supermarket-variety Decor bottle is less than $2; hardly purse-destroying; even if it needs to be replaced a few times through the year.

pirate_taco 9:25 pm 28 Aug 12

While I think the water stations are a good idea provided they are robust enough to withstand the vandalism that rendered the bubblers of my youth unusable, I don’t approve of attempting to eradicate drinks that Ms Gallagher doesn’t like.

Ban them, and the kids will bring their own or leave the grounds to get them, doubly so because now it’s illicit and cool.
Nothing wrong with a bit of sugar in moderation, but apparently Labor think this should be a binary choice.

Dacquiri 8:41 pm 28 Aug 12

This is, unfortunately, another example of a well-meaning but poorly thought-out solution to an important and difficult problem. And another example of the ‘living in a vacuum’ complex that plagues Canberra decision-makers. How about looking at what’s worked well elsewhere? I am thinking in particular about the approach adopted by some places overseas whereby no specific foods or drinks are prohibited, but requirements are laid down for the nutritional content of anything provided in the schools (including in vending machines). This has prompted the manufacturers to look seriously at the junk they’re pumping out and to reformulated these foods to increase their nutritional value by, for example, reducing the amount of fat, salt and sugar. Wouldn’t that have been a much more satisfactory way of going about things, especially if adopted at a national level?

lostinbias 7:53 pm 28 Aug 12

They shouldn’t bring this into colleges. What good is a goon sack, a stick, and some prescription pills without a can of coke to wash it all down?

dpm 3:54 pm 28 Aug 12

johnboy said :

We’re talking about kids. How many lost bottles will need replacing every day?

Especially in the new weakling culture where no living being can endure without a swing on the water bottle every five seconds.

I haven’t read all the above posts (I’m lazy!) so are you hinting that:
a) Bubblers are a better option as they wouldn’t need a bottle (that they will lose daily?), or
b) They should be able to buy a water bottle (with included water) every day instead, and stuff the bubblers/refill stations? Or
c) Something else?

In my experience, my kids haven’t lost a bottle yet, but we’re only a couple of years in! We’ve replaced them a couple of times, but none have been lost. They’re about as expensive as a lunchbox (about the cost of a bottle of water at a shop). No big deal really.

As for the filter/chilled options etc, they could always ask UC how reliable and popular they are, since they have had them for a while?

God, all these problems! It’s amazing humans have survived up to this point! Hahahaha!

Mysteryman 3:49 pm 28 Aug 12

johnboy said :

Especially in the new weakling culture where no living being can endure without a swing on the water bottle every five seconds.

I’m glad I’m not the only one who has noticed this.

rosscoact 3:08 pm 28 Aug 12

The public water dispensers are hard plumbed and wired and deliver chilled or tepid filtered water or tepid tap water and if you have the optioned model you can also get carbonated water.

Sports water bottles cost less than a bottle of water from a shop or servo.

johnboy said :

We’re talking about kids. How many lost bottles will need replacing every day?

Especially in the new weakling culture where no living being can endure without a swing on the water bottle every five seconds.

ah. I would assume that there would be one given out and then they would have to replace it if lost?

johnboy said :

Bubblers need maintenance which is a black flag to government wary of ongoing costs.

Water bottles however need constant replacement and can be a revenue stream. Yippee.

surely these are plumbed rather than reliant on bottles????Surely….

    johnboy 2:10 pm 28 Aug 12

    We’re talking about kids. How many lost bottles will need replacing every day?

    Especially in the new weakling culture where no living being can endure without a swing on the water bottle every five seconds.

Gerry-Built 12:36 pm 28 Aug 12

chewy14 said :

Pfft,
If they really want to make a difference, they should weigh every child and base extra funding and teacher bonuses on the percentage of obese children in each class.

Do you honestly believe teachers are responsible for kids presented before them being fat? In ANY way? We have several students turn up to school with their energy drinks in hand.

johnboy said :

Bubblers need maintenance which is a black flag to government wary of ongoing costs.

The damage that bubblers receive at schools is staggering. At a High School I worked at, all but a handful of the bubblers were damaged one weekend, several years ago. They have, to date, never been fixed or replaced – the school simply cannot afford them (along with many other aspects of the school environment). Bubblers are not cheap tap fittings, either.

Clearly, a water-bottle filling station would be more than “a tap” – probably having chiller and filter facilities. But there is one more thing schools will be responsible for maintaining within their school based management funding.

Honestly, I don’t see the problem with kids having access to “sugary drinks” as a treat at school; the big problem for “the fatties” is the unhealthy lifestyle and attitudes promoted at home – and NOTHING schools do will ever rectify a lifetime of poor parenting practices.

joingler 11:56 am 28 Aug 12

cmdwedge said :

I wonder if the Human Rights Commissioner will have something to say? She was a bit uppity about those shops refusing to serve high school kids during school hours – http://the-riotact.com/liberals-to-strip-discrimination-protection-to-target-waggers-with-poll/55167

Apparently not serving kids wagging school was breaching their ‘human rights’. Surely stopping kids from having a choice about what they drink during school hours is also a breach of the same rights?

They can have a choice. Cold filtered water, (healthier) fruit juices, smoothies.

Subway aren’t breaching your human right if you go in there and they don’t offer a Big Mac on the menu. This is no different.

Chop71 11:33 am 28 Aug 12

Mr Evil said :

So, if schools are being told that they have to be weened off fizzy drink revenue, when is Labor going to ween itself off poker machine revenue????

never!!! they need the punters to fund the machine.

cmdwedge 11:29 am 28 Aug 12

I wonder if the Human Rights Commissioner will have something to say? She was a bit uppity about those shops refusing to serve high school kids during school hours – http://the-riotact.com/liberals-to-strip-discrimination-protection-to-target-waggers-with-poll/55167

Apparently not serving kids wagging school was breaching their ‘human rights’. Surely stopping kids from having a choice about what they drink during school hours is also a breach of the same rights?

rosscoact said :

Great idea.

Stop supporting the provision of sugar to children through the school system by providing an alternative that people want.

If you ignore what people want i.e. cold filtered water delivered in an hygenic way (didn’t we just have a thread about urine in bubblers?) by saying use a tap, what chance have we of changing behaviour?

Government has an obligation to the community to do the right thing and not actively adding to obesity is the right thing to do.

+1

rosscoact 10:54 am 28 Aug 12

Great idea.

Stop supporting the provision of sugar to children through the school system by providing an alternative that people want.

If you ignore what people want i.e. cold filtered water delivered in an hygenic way (didn’t we just have a thread about urine in bubblers?) by saying use a tap, what chance have we of changing behaviour?

Government has an obligation to the community to do the right thing and not actively adding to obesity is the right thing to do.

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