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Legalise It?

By loubird22 - 16 October 2010 39

As a US citizen, I maintain voting rights even while living here in Australia. Midterm elections are in November and one of the big items on the California ballot is the legalisation of marijuana for anyone over 21, no medical script needed. I am sure you can imagine the intense campaigns happening on both sides of the issue.

I am interested to hear what some of your opinions are on this if that were to happen here. Would you support a medical marijuana scheme, full legalisation, etc?

Weed

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39 Responses to
Legalise It?
astrojax 8:02 pm 16 Oct 10

so, which way you gone vote, loubird??

Spideydog 7:23 pm 16 Oct 10

Pommy bastard said :

georgesgenitals said :

Why legalise it? What’s the benefit – other than possible taxation?

Less police time wasted, fewer otherwise law abiding people criminalised, less money in the hands of drug dealers, less turf wars over dealings, less court time wated, less legal burden on the state, more happy people.

In fact, I cannot think of a positive for the current situation.

I see what you are saying however, with increased use I see increased strain on the already shambles mental health system…. which in turn puts the same but opposite pressure back on the Police and health system who have to deal with the fallout of drug use and abuse … psychosis and the behaviour of people whilst under the influence of these drugs, not including the health issues that arise. Just have a look at the effect alcohol has on Policing/health system and the community as a whole, do we want to add to this by allowing open uninhibited drug use ???

People that say that Cannabis, ecstasy or LSD use is safer than “table salt” is deluding themselves.

Beserk Keyboard Warr 7:22 pm 16 Oct 10

The fact that marijuana is illegal is the biggest running joke in civilised society today.

MrPC 7:05 pm 16 Oct 10

Prohibition is an expensive and largely pointless exercise.

If you don’t like drugs, don’t use them, but you shouldn’t have the right to tell other people what they can and can’t do in their own homes.

Pommy bastard 4:02 pm 16 Oct 10

georgesgenitals said :

Why legalise it? What’s the benefit – other than possible taxation?

Less police time wasted, fewer otherwise law abiding people criminalised, less money in the hands of drug dealers, less turf wars over dealings, less court time wated, less legal burden on the state, more happy people.

In fact, I cannot think of a positive for the current situation.

georgesgenitals 3:28 pm 16 Oct 10

Why legalise it? What’s the benefit – other than possible taxation?

Pommy bastard 3:06 pm 16 Oct 10

GregW said :

I would not call it a huge risk, it was only a few years ago that any statistically significant effect was shown at all.

Wrong I’m afraid, to a person with a predisposition to psychosis, cannabis proves huge risk.

Use of Cannabis can cause a condition called drug-induced psychosis. This usually passes after a few days. However, if someone has a predisposition to a psychotic illness such as schizophrenia, cannabis may trigger the first episode of an ongoing condition such as schizophrenia. There is increasing evidence that regular cannabis use precedes and even causes higher rates of psychotic illness. At the same time, many people with schizophrenia have not used cannabis.

http://www.sane.org/information/factsheets-podcasts/547-cannabis-and-psychotic-illness

davesact 3:01 pm 16 Oct 10

Pommy bastard said :

Well, davesact, that situation, differs as they are two different substances with different effects on different people, and have different legal status.

Having said all that, if I had said they were in any way comparable, such as legally, in medical effect, or in their epidemiology, you may have a point. If I had made a comparison, or stated that the legal or moral status of one was in someway indicative of or analogous to, or in some way reflected or effected the status of the other, there may be some point of contention here

But as it is you’re just blowing smoke out of you posterior over something which has nothing whatsoever to do with my post.

Apologies for the wind, when you made reference to psychosis it evoked a thought…

Pommy bastard 2:52 pm 16 Oct 10

Well, davesact, that situation, differs as they are two different substances with different effects on different people, and have different legal status.

Having said all that, if I had said they were in any way comparable, such as legally, in medical effect, or in their epidemiology, you may have a point. If I had made a comparison, or stated that the legal or moral status of one was in someway indicative of or analogous to, or in some way reflected or effected the status of the other, there may be some point of contention here

But as it is you’re just blowing smoke out of you posterior over something which has nothing whatsoever to do with my post.

GregW 2:38 pm 16 Oct 10

Pommy bastard said :

Despite it creating a huge risk for those with a predisposition to psychosis

I would not call it a huge risk, it was only a few years ago that any statistically significant effect was shown at all.

From a physiological point of view alcohol, tobacco, paracetamol, heck even table salt are far more dangerous than cannabis, ecstasy or LSD.

Cannabis will never be legalised in the ACT until the constitution is changed to prevent federal government interference, and even then it is unlikely. The reason for this is that Australia has signed up to the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs which requires signatories to make supply and possession illegal.

International treaties only need the support of politicians, not science.

vg 2:33 pm 16 Oct 10

“How should that differ to Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome with inappropriate alcohol injestion?”

Well, spelling for starters

davesact 2:13 pm 16 Oct 10

I meant ingestion.

davesact 2:05 pm 16 Oct 10

Pommy bastard said :

“Despite it creating a huge risk for those with a predisposition to psychosis,”

How should that differ to Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome with inappropriate alcohol injestion?.. a legal drug.

arescarti42 1:46 pm 16 Oct 10

Pommy bastard said :

Despite it creating a huge risk for those with a predisposition to psychosis, I would prefer it to be legal (and taxed). If only a small percentage of the $$$$ wasted on enforcing its criminalisation was spent on good drug education and health services, we’d be a far better off society.

Agreed. Alcohol and Tobacco are far more harmful and dangerous substances that are already perfectly legal, it doesn’t make a whole lot sense to waste resources on stopping people from using it.

Pommy bastard 1:32 pm 16 Oct 10

Despite it creating a huge risk for those with a predisposition to psychosis, I would prefer it to be legal (and taxed). If only a small percentage of the $$$$ wasted on enforcing its criminalisation was spent on good drug education and health services, we’d be a far better off society.

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