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New security licence classes

By johnboy - 17 June 2011 9

Justice And Community Safety are explaining changes to security licences that came into effect on 14 June.

Instead of licence classes ranging A to H they now range from 1A to 1FP and 2A to 2E:

New Class Identifier Previous Class Identifier
1A – Patrol, guard, watch or protect property (including cash in transit) A
1B – Act as a bodyguard B
1C – Act as a crowd controller D
1D – Guard with a dog New Class
1E – Act as a monitoring centre operator New Class
1FC – Guard with a firearm for cash in transit New Class
1FP – Guard with a firearm for protecting property New Class
2A – Act as a security consultant C
2B – Sell security equipment E
2C – Carry out surveys and inspection of security equipment F
2D – Give advice about security equipment G
2E – Install, maintain, monitor, repair or service security equipment H

There will be transitional arrangements:

All licences issued before 14 June 2011 will be valid until the expiry date identified on the licence. If you do not need to add any new sub-classes you do not need to do anything as the licence class identifiers will be amended when you apply to renew your licence.

If you currently use a firearm or dog in your role or work as a monitoring centre operator you will need to apply to vary your licence to include the new sub-classes. Under the transitional arrangements, you will have two years to apply for the variation, however, you must not conduct the activity after 14 June 2011 until you have the sub-class added to your licence.

As the Commissioner for Fair Trading must be satisfied that you conducted the activity under your current licence, you are required to provide evidence when applying to add the new sub-classes. The fee to add the new sub-classes is $12.00 per sub-class. If you believe that you may need to apply for one of the new licence sub-classes please contact the Office of Regulatory Services on (02) 6207 0562.

What’s Your opinion?


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9 Responses to
New security licence classes
Skidbladnir 6:28 pm 17 Jun 11

And I’ll also point out that self-install systems (ie: typically the low-end consumer stuff) is explicitly outside the legislation.
You primarily commit an offence by carrying on a security activity, namely one or more of those things listed above as Class Identifiers _as a business or as part of employment_.

(2) However, a person does not carry on a security activity only because the person installs a lock as part of the person’s occupation as a builder.
(3) Also, a person does not carry on a security activity only because the person cuts unrestricted keys or sells self-install security systems.

steveu 6:17 pm 17 Jun 11

recommended trainers?

pptvb 5:03 pm 17 Jun 11

Basically anything sold at Bunnings, Dick Smith, etc is considered DIY, and not covered by the legislation.
$12 is only for adding classes to your licence, it still costs s minimum $130 or so, + $43 for a police check.
Cheapish, I guess, by ACT gov standards

Skidbladnir 4:54 pm 17 Jun 11

p1:
There is no “Not security equipment” section of the Regs (currently).
Until that changes, if its in the Act or also covered in Regs, its prescribed.

Also, the defining feature of a security screen door vs a screen door is one that meets AS5039.
(I think its AS2201 that determines a security camera installation from a normal camera installation, but its been years and I frankly can’t remmeber the number. But there -is- an AS for it.)

PS: Tasers, and most of the other interesting toys that police would like to keep out of your hands (batons, catapults, darts, nunchaku, soft body armour flamethrowers, electric pain compliance devices, etc) is probably declared a prohibited weapon.
You’d be hard pressed to consider them security devices.

p1 4:30 pm 17 Jun 11

Skidbladnir said :

p1 said :

Can anyone tell me how “security equipment” is defined under the law?

Yup.

Security Industry Act 2003
8 Meaning of security equipment
(1) For this Act:
security equipment means any of the following:
(a) a safe or vault;
(b) mechanical, electronic, acoustic or other equipment designed or adapted to provide or enhance security or for the protection or watching of any property;
(c) a device or equipment prescribed under the regulations for this definition.
(2) However, security equipment does not include a device or equipment declared not to be security equipment under the regulations.

Security Industry Regulation 2003
5 Prescribed security equipment—Act, s 8 (1), def security
equipment, par (c)
The following equipment is prescribed:
(a) security screen doors;
(b) security windows that have built-in locks;
(c) security garage doors that cannot be opened with keys.

So the devices I mentioned, such an sold at Dick Smith or Bunnings, ARE security equipment, unless they have specifically been declared not to be under the regulations? How do we find out what has been declared not security equipment?

Skidbladnir 2:59 pm 17 Jun 11

p1 said :

Can anyone tell me how “security equipment” is defined under the law?

Yup.

Security Industry Act 2003
8 Meaning of security equipment
(1) For this Act:
security equipment means any of the following:
(a) a safe or vault;
(b) mechanical, electronic, acoustic or other equipment designed or adapted to provide or enhance security or for the protection or watching of any property;
(c) a device or equipment prescribed under the regulations for this definition.
(2) However, security equipment does not include a device or equipment declared not to be security equipment under the regulations.

Security Industry Regulation 2003
5 Prescribed security equipment—Act, s 8 (1), def security
equipment, par (c)
The following equipment is prescribed:
(a) security screen doors;
(b) security windows that have built-in locks;
(c) security garage doors that cannot be opened with keys.

p1 2:46 pm 17 Jun 11

Henry82 said :

The $12 fee is probably the cost to add that condition onto your license (and print a new card).

That is my point. $12 for such a service is probably pretty fair. Which is why it doesn’t sound like the type of thing the ACT Government would do. Pretty sure to reprint a Drivers Licence is about $26…

Henry82 2:08 pm 17 Jun 11

I think “selling security equipment” would be checking licenses for restricted items: firearms, batons, oc spray etc.

The $12 fee is probably the cost to add that condition onto your license (and print a new card). I would assume you would have to pay for the training on top of that. Last time i looked it up a level 2 security certificate was a 2-3 week course, costing over a grand.

p1 1:37 pm 17 Jun 11

$12.00 is an unusually low fee for the ACT government to do something.

Can anyone tell me how “security equipment” is defined under the law? Does someone who sells CCTV cameras a Dick Smith need one? Or sells Security Doors at Bunnings? Or is it only for things like battons and tasers?

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