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New tool to fight feral fish

By Canfan - 17 November 2014 15

A new online resource for the community to record evidence of pest fish in their local area was launched by Minister for the Environment, Simon Corbell, today.

“Anyone with a smart phone or mobile device can use FeralFishScan to record pest fish in their local waterways,” Mr Corbell said.

Information collected will support science-based river and catchment restoration programs.

“FeralFishScan is initially being trialled in the upper Murrumbidgee with a view to launching it nationally next year,” Mr Corbell said.

“When this happens, the ACT region will act as a showcase for how citizen science can be used to combat the spread of pest fish in our waterways.

“At present the data collected applies to the five key feral fish species present in the upper Murrumbidgee. Carp is one of these species and there is a lot of interest from the community to do something about this pest.

“FeralFishScan was developed and tested through a range of cross-border partners from both within government and from the community and recognises the need to take a whole-of-catchment approach to problems such as feral fish.”

The Feral Fish Scan software was developed by the Invasive Animals Cooperative Research Centre as part of their national FeralScan initiative feralscan.org.au and comes with an interactive mapping facility to display the community-collected data.

See FeralFishScan at www.feralscan.org.au/feralfishscan/default.aspx?page=feralfish_homepage&version=143

(Simon Corbell Media Release)

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15 Responses to
New tool to fight feral fish
Antagonist 2:13 pm 18 Nov 14

Roksteddy said :

[Addressing restoration of fish habitat is going to happen and is happening.
Just around the ACT there are the engineered log jams at Tharwa, reef balls in Yerrabi Pond and the Molonglo and initiatives such as the Upper Murrumbidgee Demonstration Reach. The rock ramp fishway was built on Vanitys Crossing to allow an expanded section of river for spawning habitat for Macquarie Perch and artificial reefs have been placed in the enlarged Cotter Dam also for Macquarie Perch.

A great start. Now how do we get rid of dam wall at Tantangara? 🙂

Roksteddy 1:53 pm 18 Nov 14

wildturkeycanoe said :

dungfungus said :

Are trout on the list of feral species?
They are introduced like the rabbit, fox, camel, deer etc. but somehow we tolerate them eating our native fish.
Anyone know why this is?

If it weren’t for trout, Adaminaby would go out of business. Why are there harsh penalties and rules for catching trout if they are such a pest? I’d happily try to eradicate them from our waterways with any methods necessary, but they make the government too much money from licensing, etc.
Why not eliminate the requirement for fishing licenses if only fishing for feral species, then more people would participate?
Combating feral fish is one problem, after success we will also need to address man’s destruction of the native fish habitat if they are to get populations back to what they used to be. My thoughts, it ain’t going to happen.
The local species aren’t that special in flavor and I haven’t seen one for a long time [due to the invaders?].

Addressing restoration of fish habitat is going to happen and is happening.
Just around the ACT there are the engineered log jams at Tharwa, reef balls in Yerrabi Pond and the Molonglo and initiatives such as the Upper Murrumbidgee Demonstration Reach. The rock ramp fishway was built on Vanitys Crossing to allow an expanded section of river for spawning habitat for Macquarie Perch and artificial reefs have been placed in the enlarged Cotter Dam also for Macquarie Perch.

Ferals are definitely a problem, but there are also native species around, particularly good numbers of Golden perch and Murray cod.

wildturkeycanoe 1:08 pm 18 Nov 14

dungfungus said :

Are trout on the list of feral species?
They are introduced like the rabbit, fox, camel, deer etc. but somehow we tolerate them eating our native fish.
Anyone know why this is?

If it weren’t for trout, Adaminaby would go out of business. Why are there harsh penalties and rules for catching trout if they are such a pest? I’d happily try to eradicate them from our waterways with any methods necessary, but they make the government too much money from licensing, etc.
Why not eliminate the requirement for fishing licenses if only fishing for feral species, then more people would participate?
Combating feral fish is one problem, after success we will also need to address man’s destruction of the native fish habitat if they are to get populations back to what they used to be. My thoughts, it ain’t going to happen.
The local species aren’t that special in flavor and I haven’t seen one for a long time [due to the invaders?].

Antagonist 12:30 pm 18 Nov 14

dungfungus said :

Antagonist said :

Ben_Dover said :

HardBallGets said :

Trout were “naturalised”. Seriously!

We tolerate them because they’re good for business.

No, we tolerate them because they are good sport, good to eat. Nothing to do with business.

Actually, you are both right on this one. The NSW and Victorian bureaucracies both use business (jobs and tourism), sport, and eating qualities as reasons to justify their continued stocking in Australian waterways.

Most of the table trout in Canberra supermarkets are imported from Tasmania where trout fishing is excellent (if one likes catching feral fish).

NSW DPI and Vic DEPI don’t give two hoots where table fish for the average person come from. They are stocking fish for recreational anglers – not the hospitality industry. And they use business, sport and eating qualities as reasons to justify it.

dungfungus 12:08 pm 18 Nov 14

Antagonist said :

Ben_Dover said :

HardBallGets said :

Trout were “naturalised”. Seriously!

We tolerate them because they’re good for business.

No, we tolerate them because they are good sport, good to eat. Nothing to do with business.

Actually, you are both right on this one. The NSW and Victorian bureaucracies both use business (jobs and tourism), sport, and eating qualities as reasons to justify their continued stocking in Australian waterways.

Most of the table trout in Canberra supermarkets are imported from Tasmania where trout fishing is excellent (if one likes catching feral fish).

dungfungus 11:24 am 18 Nov 14

Antagonist said :

I agree with your sentiments, Dungers, but I am pretty sure you will find there have been no trout stocked in ACT waterways for more than 10 years now for the very reason you allude to. The last ACT stocking of trout that I am aware of was an unsuccessful attempt in LBG during 2003. And quite frankly, as a very keen angler, I would be perfectly happy if they never attempted to stock trout anywhere in Australia ever again.

Another introduced feral fish is the Redfin.
The Redfin are great for “trout-cleansing”.

Antagonist 10:25 am 18 Nov 14

Ben_Dover said :

HardBallGets said :

Trout were “naturalised”. Seriously!

We tolerate them because they’re good for business.

No, we tolerate them because they are good sport, good to eat. Nothing to do with business.

Actually, you are both right on this one. The NSW and Victorian bureaucracies both use business (jobs and tourism), sport, and eating qualities as reasons to justify their continued stocking in Australian waterways.

Roksteddy 10:20 am 18 Nov 14

Roksteddy said :

And they have a strong lobby group. Although they don’t do well around here anyway.
.

I mean the trout don’t do well around here – not the lobby group

Roksteddy 10:11 am 18 Nov 14

Ben_Dover said :

HardBallGets said :

Trout were “naturalised”. Seriously!

We tolerate them because they’re good for business.

No, we tolerate them because they are good sport, good to eat. Nothing to do with business.

And they have a strong lobby group. Although they don’t do well around here anyway.

In the meantime, the information that is input into feral fiish scan will help in control measures for other introduced species, including carp. The more people that contribute, the better the resource.

Milo11 9:56 am 18 Nov 14

dungfungus said :

Are trout on the list of feral species?
They are introduced like the rabbit, fox, camel, deer etc. but somehow we tolerate them eating our native fish.
Anyone know why this is?

Because they are seen as a resource, people will pay for someone to catch them whereas they wont with Carp and Redfin. Much the same as Deer, they are introduced however there is a closed season on them. Its a case of managing the destruction that is caused by them vs the economic benefits of them.

Ben_Dover 9:41 am 18 Nov 14

HardBallGets said :

Trout were “naturalised”. Seriously!

We tolerate them because they’re good for business.

No, we tolerate them because they are good sport, good to eat. Nothing to do with business.

dungfungus 8:48 am 18 Nov 14

HardBallGets said :

Trout were “naturalised”. Seriously!

We tolerate them because they’re good for business.

I guess Tony Abbott and Julia Gillard, who were both born in the UK, were also naturalised.

HardBallGets 11:05 pm 17 Nov 14

Trout were “naturalised”. Seriously!

We tolerate them because they’re good for business.

Antagonist 10:31 pm 17 Nov 14

I agree with your sentiments, Dungers, but I am pretty sure you will find there have been no trout stocked in ACT waterways for more than 10 years now for the very reason you allude to. The last ACT stocking of trout that I am aware of was an unsuccessful attempt in LBG during 2003. And quite frankly, as a very keen angler, I would be perfectly happy if they never attempted to stock trout anywhere in Australia ever again.

dungfungus 9:03 pm 17 Nov 14

Are trout on the list of feral species?
They are introduced like the rabbit, fox, camel, deer etc. but somehow we tolerate them eating our native fish.
Anyone know why this is?

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