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Petrol hike – it sucks!

By kimba - 7 April 2006 52

I have been thinking about the corrupt and extortionist practices of the big oil companies. They raised fuel prices in Canberra by 10-12 cents a litre just before the Canberra Day long-weekend and have done it again (even more) this week as we lead into the Easter Break and school holidays.

They have us by the balls so it is stupid to say we should boycott buying fuel (sounds like something Deb would suggest) but why not boycott buying other products from service stations like your fags, ice creams, coke, magazines etc. These items are also always hiked-up anyway. Take it further…why not boycott buying oil and other car related products. Hit them where it hurts so they can place pressure on the big oil companies.

What do you think?

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52 Responses to
Petrol hike – it sucks!
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Mr_Shab 9:22 am 12 Apr 06

Ah – we’re arguing apples and oranges. You’re saying it’s a good perk for you (it is – if I did that much driving, I’d package too). I’m arguing it’s bad public policy (which I maintain).

Midnitecalla – you could set up packaging for yourself and your employees if you wanted to. It’s not a public service perk.

midnitecalla 10:28 pm 11 Apr 06

be thank ful that you are a commonweath employee
and shelterd cos its cold and hard out here !

like i said it shows arrogance perks or not.

having been a “com employee” my self then having to work in the private sector building up a buisness paying more than my fair share of taxes supporting “shiny bums”

most who wouldnt work in an iron lung in the private sector, getting to ferry family around on my tax dollars and those cushy perks. if you cant get good workers here is my answer: fire them not coddle them.they are as valuable as a hole in a bucket full of water.

no matter how much bleating goes on not all out there think that packaging is appriciated/ admired and or a social status item.

vg 9:15 pm 11 Apr 06

Its not the economic benefits to the industry that is the real point of packaging anymore. Its a financial ‘bonus’ if you will that, in addition to wages, attracts and retains staff.

My reasons for packaging are, in all honesty, all about me and my family, not the greater good I’m sorry…despite what benefit to local businesses my packaging allows (even though it is minor).

FBT exemptions on public transport is irrelevant for me as a 24/7 shiftworker. Again public transport is a state/territory responsibility so your point is again moot I’m sorry.

It is a perk of my job. Many jobs have others and probably better than mine. I’ll take whats available

Mr_Shab 9:02 pm 11 Apr 06

VG, I have a passing familiarity with the way government works, and yes – I am being a tad naieve. FBT is federal, Public transport is state, yadda, yadda. But what if they replaced FBT exemptions on private transport with FBT exemptions on public transport? I’d say you’d still end up paying the same amount net out-of-pocket, but there would be more money for bus/train companies to run more and better service.

No, that probably wouldn’t work – but I’d say there are ways. All you policy wonks out there can come up with something, surely?

My premise (i.e – the gravy train bit) is that the FBT exemption for cars is outdated and outmoded in an era of rising petrol prices and global warming. We ought to be encouranging people to own fewer cars, and to drive them less. Given that we aren’t effectively subsidising the Aussie auto industry any more, the economic benefits to the manufacturing sector don’t exist any longer.

There are better things the feds could be spending our money on than subsidising boring V6 sedans for middle management types.

vg 8:33 pm 11 Apr 06

Sorry, 25000km +….I’m not that much of a driver

vg 8:32 pm 11 Apr 06

Shab

Having to drive 250000km + a year encourages me to travel, I’m not saying it encourages travel. An assumption by yourself. I also drive a wholly made Australian car.

Good luck to me that my employer offers it and I am in a position to utilise it. The reason it is introduced into the workplace is to encourage the retention of staff through generous conditions.

If, by salary packaging a car, I support the Australian automotive industry and at the same time, through travel use small businesses such as roadside shops, local motels or whatever then what i do can hardly be considered to be part of a gravy train.

Public transport is a state/territory legislative issue. I am a Commonwealth employee. Your argument re spending is moot in my case.

midnitecalla 8:15 pm 11 Apr 06

also those who arnt in the know , the “c” class chrysler is fuel efficient in the big car class as the V8 shuts down during off peak traffic to become a large 4 cyl. and is less thirsy than the v6 model . kinda “knight rider” but it appeals to me because of this.

midnitecalla 8:03 pm 11 Apr 06

agreed shab, and it was 1988 that that was first mooted, as for cars that are aussie made, if those dinosaurs actually built cars that most aussies lust after in the foreignpress the ratio would improve. wouldbe nice to actually pick up a solid new car with out selling your self in to slavery.

as for my comment on the C class chrysler ,its interesting to find out that i could import and adr a canadian version (rhd) for 15 grand less as its an aussie spec version stripped down for thier design rules. and thats with luxury car tax . silly hey?

Mr_Shab 9:13 am 11 Apr 06

Salary packaging wasn’t designed to encourage travel, vg – it was designed to encourage the auto industry.

It was popped into the fringe benefits tax legislation to make it more attractive to buy an Aussie car and drive it – kind of a back-door attempt to prop up the Aussie auto manufacturers without resorting to subsidies or tariffs (I think it was set up in the nacence of Hawke/Keating free-trade restructuring). Course, it didn’t work. I read that when it was introduced, 70% of cars bought in Aus. were Aussie made. It’s closer to 20% now. We’re subsidising other countries auto industries.

I think they need to chuck the whole gravy train and spend the difference on making public transport worth taking.

midnitecalla 9:51 pm 10 Apr 06

agreed on the C and keep alook out for the SRT version , as for the other comment i suppose i should have expounded a bit more.

and im biding my time on the C, as i never buy new .

even though its legal to package, its bad form to rub it into others here who dont have that bloody luxury and still work guts out to pay the taxes set to them, so many of us “upper classes” try to minimise yet still expect full benifit of. i dont package my self and yes i do invest but i dont make a point of being that crass by bugling from the roof tops.personally i think is pampering my self and some one invaribly pays. ergo taxes and the strain therof

el 9:08 pm 10 Apr 06

How are “our” taxes involved in a vehicle salary packaged by an individual?? It’s all paid for by the person and is all legal so I don’t understand your remark midnitecalla.

More power to you if you’re in a position to do it. Hell, if I find myself in that position I’ll get myself a new V8 Chrysler 300C every 5 years.

midnitecalla 7:37 pm 10 Apr 06

oh be fore you whinge i am also on top tax rate also but not as pampered as some.

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