5 January 2022

PM announces new Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural precinct for Canberra

| Karyn Starmer
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Old Parliament House, LBG, AWM

‘Ngurra’ will be built on the southern shore of Lake Burley Griffin between Old Parliament House and the Australian War Memorial. Photo: Thomas Lucraft.

A new $316 million Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural precinct has been announced by the Federal Government.

To be built on the southern shore of Lake Burley Griffin between Old Parliament House and the Australian War Memorial, the precinct will be called Ngurra, meaning ‘home’, ‘country’ or ‘place of belonging’.
The precinct will include a national resting place to care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander ancestral remains and a learning and knowledge centre.
The site will also be a new home for the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS).

In an announcement today (5 January) Prime Minister Scott Morrison said the new $316.5 million precinct would take its place among Australia’s premier institutions in the parliamentary triangle as a place of national pride and significance.

“Ngurra is the realisation of a long-held desire to have a home for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and histories at the heart of our nation,” the Prime Minister said.

“All Australians and visitors to our nation will be able to gain a deeper appreciation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ diversity and cultures, and the richness this offers our country.

“This new world-class facility will contribute to our continuing journey of reconciliation, where Indigenous Australians can tell their stories, in the way they want, for all visitors to have a greater understanding of our shared history.”

The precinct will be built in accordance with the proposal developed by AIATSIS and presented to government for approval as a result of their consultation processes.

Minister for Indigenous Australians Ken Wyatt said the learning and engagement, exhibitions, research and curation that would occur at Ngurra would be significant acts of truth-telling.

“At its heart will be a national resting place where the remains of Indigenous Australians taken from their country will be cared for until they are able to be returned to their communities,” Minister Wyatt said.

“And in instances where provenance has been forgotten or erased, they will be cared for in perpetuity with dignity and respect.

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“As new home to AIATSIS, the precinct will also house and make accessible the world’s largest collection of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural and heritage items.

“Ngurra will provide a new perspective on our shared history, as a significant moment for truth-telling, and a new place where the diversity of Indigenous Australia and one of the world’s oldest living cultures will be celebrated.”

An architectural design competition will be run in 2022 to develop an iconic design fitting for the location and that reflects Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ aspirations, achievements and deep connection to country.

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Peter Graves11:11 am 06 Jan 22

It does NOT appear that the local Indigenous elders and custodians WERE consulted
https://www.canberratimes.com.au/story/7570976/traditional-custodians-reject-ngurra-precinct/?cs=14329

Wouldn’t matter who they consulted with, another of their group would be unhappy. They are not really a unified mob.

“jangles keys”

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