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Rhys Brown and poor impulse control

By johnboy 3 September 2010 32

Rhys Brown is awaiting sentencing for taking a machete to Woden Plaza and threatening to kill another man.

He’s trying to convince the court that he needs to be out of prison because custodial life has got him using drugs again.

So it’s a little surprising to read on the ABC that he’s thrown a jug of water at Justice Richard Refshauge in court and had to be restrained by five corrective services officers.

One hopes he will not be gracing the streets of Canberra until he’s gotten a better grip on his temper.


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Rhys Brown and poor impulse control
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Special G 4:53 pm 11 Sep 10

Saw in the paper today he got 3 1/2 years in. Maybe in that time he can work on his drug habit.

p1 9:49 am 06 Sep 10

Tooks said :

sepi said :

what i don’t get is who pays for these drugs. aren’t they meant to be expensive. who is giving them away to prisoners?

Prisoners have access to money through bank accounts.

Are there ATMs in prison? Is that a human right requirement?

Tooks 6:18 pm 05 Sep 10

sepi said :

what i don’t get is who pays for these drugs. aren’t they meant to be expensive. who is giving them away to prisoners?

Prisoners have access to money through bank accounts.

Skidbladnir 10:22 am 05 Sep 10

DBCooper said :

Wonder what he got for throwing the jug of water at the justice?

It was ‘Justice’ Refshauge, so hopefully a round of applause.

fgzk 7:32 am 05 Sep 10

Ive heard that our society is corrupt.

cleo 10:08 pm 04 Sep 10

I’ve heard the jail is corrupt already!

Mike Crowther 8:54 pm 04 Sep 10

….but an equally pertinent question is, “Why is a prisoner accused of committing a violent offense allowed to sit at the bloody bar table???” (The fact he was escorted by FIVE screws is an pretty good indication that he could be volatile chap.) I recall a female prosecutor was hit over the head with a lectern by another accused last year. Is there no corporate memory operating? It is apparent farnarkler, that someone in the A.G.’s dept (or the judiciary) are not doing their job properly either.

sepi 8:33 pm 04 Sep 10

what i don’t get is who pays for these drugs. aren’t they meant to be expensive. who is giving them away to prisoners?

farnarkler 5:09 pm 04 Sep 10

It is apparent then that someone somewhere within ACT corrective services is not doing their job properly.

jdmal 3:55 pm 04 Sep 10

Farnarkler said ” what is the point? ”

what he said (above). There’s too many way’s and means and bodgy people in power.

fgzk 3:48 pm 04 Sep 10

You shouldn’t forget we have some very resourceful people imprisoned. Not just the boys. They are naturally/freakishly talented at this stuff. I really don’t think you can stop it. You might be able to reduce it. But you cant stop it. Just the same way as you will never be able to stop illicit drugs in the community. Denial goes a lot further than government.

DBCooper 3:46 pm 04 Sep 10

You mean Criminals don’t follow the laws? lol imagine that.

http://absolutelytrue.com/2007/10/man-hides-heroin-in-penis-cellphone-in-r/

He didn’t seem to take the judge seriously? Wonder what he got for throwing the jug of water at the justice?

Mike Crowther 12:40 pm 04 Sep 10

Clown Killer asks “How do drugs get into prison in the first place.” Prisons have a long list of people who are allowed to come and go. Staff (not just prison officers, but teachers, welfare workers, nurses, Drug and alcohol councelors, tech repair people, police, fire brigade assessors, official visitors, lawyers, politicians,) visitors and (most importantly) inmates who work in the grounds cleaning mowing etc. So a gaol isn’t the sterile container many people think it is. People come and go, and sometimes they come with lots of drugs shoved up their arseholes. Now in the US of A and in television land, officers don rubber gloves and retrieve such. Here in Aus, such searches are illegal. (I’m not advocating them, just stating facts.) There is much motivation for someone to bring in drugs. ie: Their family is threatened on the outside, their safety in threatened on the inside…greed, philosophical.. Occasionally prison officers do go bad (N.S.W. have caught about six in a ten year period.) However those who do are considered dogs by their peers as they put the safety of their workmates at risk. There are no nods and winks among prison officers when it comes to their own safety (pommy bastard).

If you want to increase drug use inside, 1) Run your institution on minimum staff eg: three to supervise up to fifty visitors. 2) Have a judiciary which through inaction on detected smugglers, encourages people to test the system. (spot on Tooks) 3. Have areas of the institution where inmates can go for ‘quiet contemplation’ out of sight of staff. 4. Have no contingency for when your staff are threatened/assaulted by inmates or their supporters. 5. Plan for conjugal visits. 6. Have an as yet untested Human Rights Act that can paralyze any disciplinary program that might be tried. 7. Have a government that is in denial.

54-11 12:10 pm 04 Sep 10

Exactly, PB.

Pommy bastard 11:31 am 04 Sep 10

Tooks said :

It doesn’t help when visitors who smuggle drugs in – and are caught – are not banned from visiting.

Some one would sue, as it would be seen as protectionism of the warders market…

Tooks 11:14 am 04 Sep 10

It doesn’t help when visitors who smuggle drugs in – and are caught – are not banned from visiting.

Beserk Keyboard Warrior 10:56 am 04 Sep 10

farnarkler said :

‘He’s trying to convince the court that he needs to be out of prison because custodial life has got him using drugs again’

Surely this is a joke right? How do drugs get into prison in the first place? Any current or ex prison officer care to enlighten us?

Drugs generally come in through one of two means: (i) via visitors or (ii) over the fence. Sometimes it’s as simple as stuffing a tennis ball full of smack and smashing it over the fence with a tennis racket; unsophisticated but very hard to stop unless you wan’t to build a billion-dollar roof over the place.

It’s arguable that drugs are more easily obtainable from within prison walls than outside them.

farnarkler 10:40 am 04 Sep 10

jdml what is the point?

PB if the prisoners have access to free drug rehabilitation, something Hollywood stars pay thousands for, they should be forced to take it.

Pommy bastard 9:47 am 04 Sep 10

Does putting people in a “drug free” prison not a contravention of their human rights? Like them not having access to the internet, not getting conjugal visits, not having room service, having TV’s smaller than 108 inches, not being referred to as “Sir” by the warders.

jdmal 12:29 am 04 Sep 10

They’ve got dogs, x-rays the whole lot- ur missing the point farnakler.

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