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Simon flies a kite on banning plastic shopping bags

By johnboy 24 May 2010 40

Simon Corbell is tentatively suggesting he’s thinking about banning plastic shopping bags of less than 35 microns thickness.

Meaning we end up buying packs of plastic bags for putting garbage into, rather than getting them with the shopping.

While many people like to use re-usable bags instead of plastic ones it’s worth noting that those people are already free to do so.

Either way we’ll all manage some how and this way Mr Corbell gets to make more law, which seems to be what makes him happy.

Lightweight plastic shopping bags

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Simon flies a kite on banning plastic shopping bags
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PrinceOfAles 4:08 am 03 Jun 10

Spinney Woods said :

“Food scraps and organic waste can and should be composted by everyone and reused in the garden and what’s left should be just annoying plastic wrapping etc which are all ‘clean’ waste”.

That`s all well and good if you live in a 3 bedroom home on a quarter acre. People who live in apartments don`t have compost bins or gardens.

krats 6:09 pm 27 May 10

bd84 said :

If you had half a brain you would realise that the supermarkets absorb the cost of plastic bags because they’re a minor cost when compared to all the other costs involved in operating supermarkets. Building, fitout, maintenance, staff, electricty/water/rates will make up almost all of a stores expenses (excluding inventory), and you will find the cost of plastic bags to supermarkets would be less than 1% of total expenses. Hence why if they were banned, there would be no change in the price of groceries.

YOU CAN NOT BE SERIOUS!!!!!!!!!!

Costs like plastic bags are NOT ABSORBED THEY ARE PASSED ON to the CUSTOMER!
How long have you lived on mars for!

damien haas 5:51 pm 27 May 10

Woody Mann-Caruso said :

it relied on NLP to lead you to that thought

Wow. Just…wow. I mean, this is one step away from saying you believe they sent special radiation down the phone line to make you act against your will, having primed your brain with special conductive alloys by dosing your water supply. Did you pulverise your X-Files DVDs so you could inject them directly into your bloodstream?

So much of what you’ve previously posted suddenly makes sense.

Im not sure I understand this, although obviously you are implying Im some gullible fool. If you knew anything about Neuro Linguistic Programming, and how leading answers can deliver results you seek, then maybe you would understand the point I was trying to make.

Sandpiper 4:51 pm 27 May 10

I’ve just moved here from SA which banned plastic shopping bags last year. At the time I lived in the CBD about 1km from the supermarket. The car was in storage so we were walking everywhere and could only buy what we could carry. One main affect of the banning of the bags was the behaviour of the check out operators who now take a very dim view of anyone who asks for a bag.

One young gent actually argued with me about putting a large box of chips in a bag of its own because he said the box was designed so that it didn’t need a bag. While there are holes in the top of the box for fingers, when you have several shopping bags to carry in each hand additional to this box, you can’t get your fingers into the holes. I knew I’d not be able to get my shopping home without that box in its own bag and had to do everything bar ask for the manager to get that blasted bag!

Under this regime you also have to be very careful when you go clothes shopping. I dropped into Target one day for some underwear. Once paid for, realised that you had to officially request a plastic bag prior to your purchase or you are forced to walk with your underwear in hand through the mall for your sins.

To top it all off, not long after I got trained up in the ways of avoiding the use of plastic shopping bags, I holidayed QLD where no such ban existed. I did a large shop and put all the stuff on the counter and then (as is often now the case in Adelaide) asked the lady to put it all in my trolly, bagless. She gave me the self-same look one now gets in South Australia for the complete opposite reason. I explained to her that no, I’m not some kind of weirdo, I am from Adelaide where you are much-frowned-upon if you ask to buy a plastic shopping bag for your items and we had a good laugh over the irony.

Perhaps we ought to learn to carry our goods on our heads like the Africans- they don’t seem to have a plastic bag problem!

bd84 9:22 pm 25 May 10

hmm some warped HTML going on there, the quotes didn’t work properly

bd84 9:20 pm 25 May 10

[

krats said :

Well yes if you want plastic bags you should have to buy them. People currently think it’s their god-given right to have a free plastic bag with their shopping no matter how few things they buy. I worked in a supermarket for years and you’d be amazed at just how many absolute morons there are out there who want a plastic bag for things like a chocolate bar, a packet of cigarettes, a packet of chips, a bottle of milk complete with handle or one loaf of bread.

I don’t mind which way they do it, with a levy or with a complete ban. People will have to get used to not getting their prized plastic bags, a ban is likely eventually.

The plastic bags are NOT FREE.read my earlier post.If you didn’t know that… you have never worked in a supermarket-or you are a complete ignoramus.

If you had half a brain you would realise that the supermarkets absorb the cost of plastic bags because they’re a minor cost when compared to all the other costs involved in operating supermarkets. Building, fitout, maintenance, staff, electricty/water/rates will make up almost all of a stores expenses (excluding inventory), and you will find the cost of plastic bags to supermarkets would be less than 1% of total expenses. Hence why if they were banned, there would be no change in the price of groceries.

Woody Mann-Caruso 6:54 pm 25 May 10

it relied on NLP to lead you to that thought

Wow. Just…wow. I mean, this is one step away from saying you believe they sent special radiation down the phone line to make you act against your will, having primed your brain with special conductive alloys by dosing your water supply. Did you pulverise your X-Files DVDs so you could inject them directly into your bloodstream?

So much of what you’ve previously posted suddenly makes sense.

Postalgeek 6:13 pm 25 May 10

@#32

Sounds like we need another balanced survey

damien haas 5:13 pm 25 May 10

I was one of the people called by the researchers asking questions about the plastic bag policy. every single question was designed so that you would answer that banning plastic bags was the right thing to do. Worse than that, it relied on NLP to lead you to that thought by the conclusion of the survey.

Being aware of tricks like this I didnt play along and tried to answer outside the permitted responses. i suspect my answers were ignored when tallied.

someone should foi the questions and you will see what i am talking about. disingenuous policy creation.

georgesgenitals 2:42 pm 25 May 10

Woody Mann-Caruso said :

Even “QUEANBEYAN”has these bins.Yet in the nations capital city we do not.How pathetic!

Yes, let’s have an army of taxpayer-funded trucks driving around to remove green waste you could just mulch or compost on site.

I doubt a levy would truly cover the full costs of using empty bags. And the bin liner argument? Give me a break. “I don’t just throw the bags away. I position them near other rubbish first, then throw them away! It’s totally recycling!”

Once you’ve dutifully recycled your paper, cardboard boxes and bags, steel cans, glass jars, PET containers and compostable scraps, you should have SFA to throw out anyway. If you don’t, then society doesn’t need to prop up your wasteful habits with free, non-degradable gift wrapping for your trash.

The idea of the green waste bins is to dispose of branches, cuttings, etc, as well as just lawn clippings. The larger stuff is mulched up and sold back to the public. The site where the mulching is done also accepts green waste by the trailerload for free. It’s a really handy resource.

Woody Mann-Caruso 2:32 pm 25 May 10

Even “QUEANBEYAN”has these bins.Yet in the nations capital city we do not.How pathetic!

Yes, let’s have an army of taxpayer-funded trucks driving around to remove green waste you could just mulch or compost on site.

I doubt a levy would truly cover the full costs of using empty bags. And the bin liner argument? Give me a break. “I don’t just throw the bags away. I position them near other rubbish first, then throw them away! It’s totally recycling!”

Once you’ve dutifully recycled your paper, cardboard boxes and bags, steel cans, glass jars, PET containers and compostable scraps, you should have SFA to throw out anyway. If you don’t, then society doesn’t need to prop up your wasteful habits with free, non-degradable gift wrapping for your trash.

Lazy I 2:18 pm 25 May 10

I love this topic, the supermarkets made a killing out of it.

Everyone switched to the ‘green bags’ (colour only) to avoid the scorn in the shopping queue from environmental pundits feeding the hype to ‘do the right thing’.

The best bit is, people started paying for these bags, $1+ each!.. and guess what.. they are made from plastic! and take longer to biodegrade than regular plastic bags. Sure people have started re-using them.. (pat on the back, keep saving your pennies, a Prius is within reach!) but has anyone noticed the changing colour of the landfill at Mugga lane? that’s not astroturf!.

+1 for comment #11, this problem was solved long ago.

emd 1:50 pm 25 May 10

The ban does not apply to small no-handle bags used to hold fruit & veg or meat products. It applies to bags with handles (said the radio news yesterday afternoon).

I hope it won’t apply to cornstarch bags, which are compostable, but will apply to epi-bags which are degradable but not biodegradable.

As a retailer and as a consumer, I prefer a ban rather than a levy. A levy would be minimal (5-10c per bag, according to the news reports) and would not change consumer choices. The levy would add to administrivia for retailers collecting it on behalf of government (as if GST isn’t enough), and has the potential for time-consuming and costly legal challenges by the lobbying group representing supermarket owners. An outright ban is simpler to implement and more likely to reduce the number of plastic bags consumers take home with their shopping.

In my own shop, I’ve tried cornstarch bags in the past but now use brown paper bags and also sell cornstarch and hemp shopping bags, and people seem quite happy with this. In fact, I just had a customer tell me that she thinks a ban on plastic bags is the best way to get people into the habit of remembering to BYO.

housebound 12:44 pm 25 May 10

Does that mean we lose those small plastic bags for fruit and veg, fish and meat? Will butchers paper go up in price as we all start to rely on it again? Does it mean we no longer can have our meat, with blood leaking from the packaging, in a separate bag? Will supermarkets have to take more care in their packaging?

More seriously, here’s a link to the federal reasoning: http://www.ephc.gov.au/taxonomy/term/54. The RIS documents make for interesting reading.

Spinney Woods 11:24 am 25 May 10

I find it curious that a lot of people are saying they need these bags for bin liners. Let’s see….cardboard, paper, cans and bottles go in the recycling bin and if they’re washed don’t require a plastic bag to protect the bin. Food scraps and organic waste can and should be composted by everyone and reused in the garden and what’s left should be just annoying plastic wrapping etc which are all ‘clean’ waste.

Ban them I say. They’re an enviromental nightmare. We survived for plenty of years without them before they were invented so we can do it again.

krats 10:07 am 25 May 10

Well yes if you want plastic bags you should have to buy them. People currently think it’s their god-given right to have a free plastic bag with their shopping no matter how few things they buy. I worked in a supermarket for years and you’d be amazed at just how many absolute morons there are out there who want a plastic bag for things like a chocolate bar, a packet of cigarettes, a packet of chips, a bottle of milk complete with handle or one loaf of bread.

I don’t mind which way they do it, with a levy or with a complete ban. People will have to get used to not getting their prized plastic bags, a ban is likely eventually.

The plastic bags are NOT FREE.read my earlier post.If you didn’t know that… you have never worked in a supermarket-or you are a complete ignoramus.

krats 9:57 am 25 May 10

georgesgenitals said :

Just mandate the use of biodegradable bags.

How hard is it?

That unfortunately falls under the common sense category.That was issued at birth-but is now an optional extra.That very few choose!

Ceej1973 6:17 am 25 May 10

As Greens leader Bob Brown recently quoted, “humans will ultimately chose the fate of earth themselves”, or s.th to that effect. Unfortunately, every human on earth has a different opinion on how they should or shouldnt protect the environment, and the system that we have to contol popular opinion/s (Governments)usually have their own opinion or agenda to protect too.

canberrabramberra 1:55 am 25 May 10

This is the most insane suggestion, the fact so many people voted yes on this is frightening. The government should have nothing to do with what bags I use. We need a libertarian party in Australia

Deano 11:57 pm 24 May 10

krats said :

Oh! and by the way…what has happened to “no waste by 2010”.-Just another lie.Kate(noddy)has at least gone!

It turned out that it was only an ‘aspiration’ target – what you rename a target that you are about to fail to meet.

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