Skip to content Skip to main navigation

News

Skilled legal advice with
accessible & personal attention

So who wants a pay cut?

By johnboy - 22 November 2013 32

Government News has a story on plans at Health to offer demotions in an effort to get payroll down:

The Community and Public Sector Union (CPSU) has successfully sought to enter consultations with the Department of Health following confirmation that a range of voluntary workplace flexibility options – including reduced hours and voluntary demotions – have been put to staff as a way of cutting budgets and potentially reducing the need for redundancies.

The tactics by Health open a bold new front in the bid to reduce the staff costs in the Australian Public Service because they are likely to act as a frontrunner for similar initiatives in other departments.

What’s Your opinion?


Post a comment
Please login to post your comments, or connect with
32 Responses to
So who wants a pay cut?
Jardeath 4:28 pm 22 Nov 13

magiccar9 said :

Rollersk8r said :

Sure I’ll take a ~20% pay cut, just as long as the bank’s willing to waive 20% of my mortgage.

Proof of the self entitlement of the PS and those living beyond their means. An interesting person called in on radio regarding this topic (I think it could have been 666 yesterday). She stated that she wouldn’t take a pay cut because it would impact the lifestyle she was comfortable with.
I think many public servants need to sit up and pull their finger out and be more aware of what’s going on around them. Instead they sit by and complain about not being able to fill up their Mercedes or BMW SUV or not get their nails done each week.

10/10 spot on would read again etc.

magiccar9 3:27 pm 22 Nov 13

Rollersk8r said :

Sure I’ll take a ~20% pay cut, just as long as the bank’s willing to waive 20% of my mortgage.

Proof of the self entitlement of the PS and those living beyond their means. An interesting person called in on radio regarding this topic (I think it could have been 666 yesterday). She stated that she wouldn’t take a pay cut because it would impact the lifestyle she was comfortable with.
I think many public servants need to sit up and pull their finger out and be more aware of what’s going on around them. Instead they sit by and complain about not being able to fill up their Mercedes or BMW SUV or not get their nails done each week.

Mothy 2:38 pm 22 Nov 13

Pitchka said :

WOW, and APS1 earning $77k… Nothing like a well constructed email totally f&&ked up with a stupid typo..

D’oH!

Ladies and gentlemen, one more reason to be a paid subscriber, the ability to go back and edit posts (I think?). Naturally I meant APS 6, Band 1.

Pitchka 1:10 pm 22 Nov 13

Mothy said :

I’m just wanting to see detail – for example, my main question is whether, as with a redundancy, that part of your wage that is surplus to requirements is paid out.

To work an example, let’s demote an EL1 in the first band ($94,705p.a) to an APS1 in the first band ($77,067). Figures effective 1st July 2013 from the online enterprise agreement, page 64.

The department will save $17,638p.a. or $339.19 a week.

?

WOW, and APS1 earning $77k… Nothing like a well constructed email totally f&&ked up with a stupid typo..

HiddenDragon 12:56 pm 22 Nov 13

watto23 said :

One of the car plants already had staff take a pay cut.
The public service needs to wake up and realise they are getting paid a bucket load more and on terms and conditions people can only dream of in the public sector.

For example getting annual pay rises is a rarity in many industries. The fact the public service has got them year on year and the private enterprise hasn’t means that when a public servant calls me a filthy rich contractor I feel like punching them in the head. I’m sure my company charges a lot for my services but I’m lucky to see a third of what they charge me out at.

+1 to the comment about annual pay rises – the apparent sense of righteous entitlement, and the absolute outrage at the prospect of anything less than CPI-plus for the annual adjustment, is something to behold. If people, egged on by their unions, price themselves out of the market, they shouldn’t be too surprised when unpalatable options are dished up. With the Budget looking bleak for the forseeable future, much more of this to come, I reckon.

p1 12:43 pm 22 Nov 13

zig said :

They should be trimming the dead wood and rewarding the workers who do their work anyway. Some people within the APS work their arses off to cover lazy sods.

Personally I find it a little ironic that the whole “we’ll cut numbers by natural attrition” bs means that managers, for the most part, can’t use the reduction of staff to toss the muppets.

Hopefully when it gets to involuntary redundancies someone will actually look critically at the people being fired and not just the desk they sit at that day.

Rollersk8r 12:19 pm 22 Nov 13

Sure I’ll take a ~20% pay cut, just as long as the bank’s willing to waive 20% of my mortgage.

YeahBuddy 11:58 am 22 Nov 13

MightyJoe said :

So i take it Jane Halton is demoting herself? and the Band 3 / 2 and 1 SES will be leading by example?

DoHA staff could be so lucky

MightyJoe 11:39 am 22 Nov 13

So i take it Jane Halton is demoting herself? and the Band 3 / 2 and 1 SES will be leading by example?

Mothy 11:32 am 22 Nov 13

I’m just wanting to see detail – for example, my main question is whether, as with a redundancy, that part of your wage that is surplus to requirements is paid out.

To work an example, let’s demote an EL1 in the first band ($94,705p.a) to an APS1 in the first band ($77,067). Figures effective 1st July 2013 from the online enterprise agreement, page 64.

The department will save $17,638p.a. or $339.19 a week.

Using the severance benefit on page 53, where a voluntary redundancy would be paid at 2 weeks per year of service, of 4 weeks minimum and 48 weeks maximum, for that part of your employment made redundant can you receive a payout? i.e. $2,035.15 for a 3 year public servant, $4,070.31 for a 6 year, and so on.

?

zorro29 11:03 am 22 Nov 13

zig said :

They should be trimming the dead wood and rewarding the workers who do their work anyway. Some people within the APS work their arses off to cover lazy sods.

+1…there are so many people who are overpromoted or just don’t do anything. I can name at least a dozen in my immediate work area who could be culled and it would probably enhance productivity.

watto23 9:52 am 22 Nov 13

One of the car plants already had staff take a pay cut.
The public service needs to wake up and realise they are getting paid a bucket load more and on terms and conditions people can only dream of in the public sector.

For example getting annual pay rises is a rarity in many industries. The fact the public service has got them year on year and the private enterprise hasn’t means that when a public servant calls me a filthy rich contractor I feel like punching them in the head. I’m sure my company charges a lot for my services but I’m lucky to see a third of what they charge me out at.

shirty_bear 9:50 am 22 Nov 13

harvyk1 said :

If this was happening in the car industry, the building industry or any other industry that “real Australian’s” work in, we’d be seeing protests bringing the major cities to a stand still. Today Tonight and A Current Affair would both be running stories non stop, and yet because it’s “Canberra” this sort of uncertainty around peoples jobs is not only accepted, but encouraged….

Those industries haven’t seen menial/entry-level roles float up and up the scale, such that the bottom couple of rungs on the ladder are now scarcely in use at all. It would appear that a great many PS roles are now a couple of rungs higher than they used to be for no real change in performance. The lack of protest may suggest that the people involved also think this way.

No-one wants a demotion, of course. But it likely beats the alternative, and a hard heart says it’s probably warranted.

zig 9:43 am 22 Nov 13

They should be trimming the dead wood and rewarding the workers who do their work anyway. Some people within the APS work their arses off to cover lazy sods.

harvyk1 9:13 am 22 Nov 13

If this was happening in the car industry, the building industry or any other industry that “real Australian’s” work in, we’d be seeing protests bringing the major cities to a stand still. Today Tonight and A Current Affair would both be running stories non stop, and yet because it’s “Canberra” this sort of uncertainty around peoples jobs is not only accepted, but encouraged….

1 2 3

Related Articles

CBR Tweets

Sign up to our newsletter

Top
Copyright © 2017 Riot ACT Holdings Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.
www.the-riotact.com | www.b2bmagazine.com.au | www.thisiscanberra.com

Search across the site