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So you think you know about Gallipoli? The Second International Gallipoli Symposium will teach you more

By johnboy - 3 April 2009 47

Here’s a fun announcement out of ANU in the lead-up to Anzac Day.

The Second International Gallipoli Symposium is taking place at ANU’s Centre for Arab & Islamic Studies from 15 to 16 April 2009.

    “For many people, Gallipoli exists in a kind of time bubble that popped into being in 1915, a chamber of national memories which we open up once a year on Anzac Day,” argues historian Dr Peter Londey from the School of Humanities at ANU. “We want to show that rather than being a ‘silent wilderness’ on which a brief WWI campaign was fought, the peninsula has been a site of numerous settlements, population movements and wars for thousands of years.”…

    The research team will dig deep into the Bronze Age, Greek, Roman, Byzantine, Ottoman and contemporary periods, looking at the history of human settlement, the military history of the region, and the layering of memories as the many visitors to the peninsula have reacted to the landscape and its stories.

    “In ancient Greek times, for example, there were several expeditions from Athens and Sparta to help defend the Greek settlements on the Gallipoli peninsula from Thracian incursions,” Dr Londey said. “The Greeks even built a major defensive wall across the top of the peninsula – the remains of which we’ll be looking for.”

UPDATED: Not to be outdone the War Memorial has announced they’re having lectures this Sunday 5 April:

    This Sunday, three historians from the Australian War Memorial will present fascinating talks on the ANZAC experience at Gallipoli.

    As ANZAC Day approaches, accounts of Gallipoli will focus on courage, endurance, humour in adversity and, above all, mateship.

    Yet, Gallipoli has a dark side. As well as being poorly led, the Australians soldiers were poorly trained and suffered needless casualties as a result. Improvement at all levels was slow in coming. When the last great attempt to win the campaign was made in August, many of the earlier problems arose again.

    This presentation will bring a sense of perspective and objectivity to a subject that has become cloaked in popular myths and misconceptions. It promises to be stimulating, thought-provoking and controversial.

2pm-4pm in the BAE Systems Theatre. Admission Free.

What’s Your opinion?


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47 Responses to
So you think you know about Gallipoli? The Second International Gallipoli Symposium will teach you more
johnboy 1:43 pm 03 Apr 09

I think the US Navy had a lot more to do with our current non-japanese speaking status than Anzacs.

Granny 1:40 pm 03 Apr 09

I’m sorry you’ve had a bad experience, Clown Killer. If people don’t want to go, then nobody is making them. If people do want to go their choice should be treated with respect.

You could say the same about the races, or walking through Civic.

ANZAC day is a deeply personal thing. Bogans will be bogans even if we stopped celebrating it. Do you seriously think that it’s the fault of the flag, or remembering our fallen in war that these people are as they are?

If they didn’t stand up and fight we’d be living in Great South Japan now, and that’s simply a fact.

War is horrible. But sometimes it really is better to die on your feet than to live on your knees.

Clown Killer 1:29 pm 03 Apr 09

I’ve stood there alone and cold at dawn.

It loses it’s gravitas just a tad when you have to step over the bodies of Australian backpackers lying in their own vomit too drunk to get up.

Granny 1:22 pm 03 Apr 09

Oh, I’ve never heard that one before! Thank you so much. I’d like you not to tell me how I should feel about ANZAC day or my family members lost in those wars.

peterh 1:20 pm 03 Apr 09

Clown Killer said :

What I’m confused about is this ANZAC pilgrimage thing. Did I miss something?

The “pilgrimage thing” has gone from a quiet day of reflection to just another opportunity for cashed up bogans to export their jingoistic brand of ugly nationalism to another land. It’s a step or two back from the Cronulla riots but with a Mediterranean backdrop. You’re no longer missing much.

CK, not all of us aspiring to visit the place where some of our great grandfathers managed to survive and return to australia are bogans. I would like to see the place my grandfather described, even after he had been there many years later, after the 2nd world war. He saw it, as i do, as a place for reflection, in the stupidity of the commanding officers, and the futility of war. It is worth the pilgrimage to recognise that there were many, many young men lost, on both sides, for such a stupid reason.

Jivrashia 1:19 pm 03 Apr 09

Granny said :

Fine. Insult away!

Granny, I’d like you to mull over the song “And The Band Played Waltzing Matilda”.

Granny 1:19 pm 03 Apr 09

Well, as a bogan, why wouldn’t I want to export my jingoistic brand of ugly nationalism?

farq 12:57 pm 03 Apr 09

oh granny, get off it.

Granny 12:53 pm 03 Apr 09

Fine. Insult away!

johnboy 12:51 pm 03 Apr 09

What people dare is really their business and not yours Granny.

Granny 12:50 pm 03 Apr 09

Much of a generalisation, what? A lot of school groups have been deeply moved by the Gallipoli experience, and a lot of regular Australians.

How dare you insult them like that! You’re the one sounding like a prejudiced bogan.

Clown Killer 12:34 pm 03 Apr 09

What I’m confused about is this ANZAC pilgrimage thing. Did I miss something?

The “pilgrimage thing” has gone from a quiet day of reflection to just another opportunity for cashed up bogans to export their jingoistic brand of ugly nationalism to another land. It’s a step or two back from the Cronulla riots but with a Mediterranean backdrop. You’re no longer missing much.

Granny 12:18 pm 03 Apr 09

Jivrashia said :

What I’m confused about is this ANZAC pilgrimage thing. Did I miss something?

Yep.

Jivrashia 12:14 pm 03 Apr 09

I was lead to believe that 25/4/1915 was the day when someone cocked up really really badly and ended up leaving countless number of young men on shitty grounds to be slaughtered like cattles to the grinder, and the countries who served up those men were too embarrassed to even mention it for the following number of years until someone said let’s pay those men some respect, especially those that never returned.

What I’m confused about is this ANZAC pilgrimage thing. Did I miss something?

“Then in 1915, the country said ‘Son. There’s no time for rovin’ there’s work to be done.’ So they gave me a tin hat, and gave me a gun, and they sent me away to the war.”

ant 10:01 am 03 Apr 09

That’s interesting. I studied at ANU when Dr Londey was there, then he went as a historian to the Australian War Memorial for some years, now evidently he’s back at ANU.

That Dardanelles area has seen a lot of activity over the millennia, and it is timely to remember that history didn’t start there when we fought a war there in 1915.

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