Skip to content Skip to main navigation

News

Skilled legal advice with
accessible & personal attention

Tailgaters and aggressive drivers… WHY?

By Steven Bailey 10 December 2014 80

road-rage-091214

Believe it or not, I’ve never received a speeding ticket, lost a demerit point or been penalised for the conduct of my driving. At this early stage in the article, I am resisting with all my might not to flounder into a tirade about parking tickets in the ACT. I won’t… I promise. Luck has certainly played a role in my near-perfect record but the central impetuous for my general good behaviour is that I simply don’t want to die or worse, kill someone else.

As the holiday season happily happens upon many of us, like many Canberrans, I fear for the lives of us all in the knowledge that some families will be devastated by another Christmas tragedy. Whether it is the roller coaster race to the coast or the hot-headed rush to Sydney, we know that some people will sadly not return. I can understand occasionally putting the foot down to overtake, and dare I say it, I am quite sympathetic towards people who get caught for a low range drink driving offence. But what I cannot understand is people who tailgate at high speeds or wilfully drive aggressively.

My fiancé and I were driving home from Sydney last weekend, and I was astounded by the number of people who actually think that if you drive up someone’s arse you will in fact arrive at your destination sooner. We were pretty much sitting on 115km/h most of the way, and during that time we saw the aftermath of what looked like two horrific accidents. I wondered what caused them. I wondered how frightened the people must have been, if they were stuck in their cars for very long, or if anyone died. And I wondered if it will ever happen to me or someone I love. For me, that is all the impetuous I need to drive safely.

We can put speed cameras on every corner; we could waste precious police resources by drug testing every daggy looking teenager who might have had a joint or two on the weekend; we can defect any car that looks over ten-years old; we can hit people with stupidly excessive fines for driving unlicensed or unregistered. Most of these measures simply penalise people for being poor. I understand the sad reality that we will never completely stop people from dying on our roads – unless of course we lower the speed limits to zero which is what the Greens would like us to do.

The problem is idiots. We have too many idiots on the roads. I support less punitive measures imposed on those who can least afford to pay them and more undercover police on the roads pulling over people who tailgate and drive aggressively. Please drive safely during this holiday period everyone and if you come across a maniac, don’t aggravate him, and just think about your family. Oh, and Simon Corbell, I haven’t forgotten about those parking tickets!

According to the Federal Government’s Australian Road Deaths Database, eight people have died on ACT roads this year. Out of the eight deaths, seven were male, and five were males under the age of thirty-one. The only female was a pedestrian, and the male aged in his late forties was a cyclist.

What’s Your opinion?


Please login to post your comments, or connect with
80 Responses to
Tailgaters and aggressive drivers… WHY?
Filter
Showing only Website comments
Order
Newest to Oldest
Oldest to Newst
mjconley 7:31 pm 18 Jun 15

Fair enough if you are in the right lane with no cars in front of you to get tail-gaited; but annoys the **** out of me when a moron tail-gates and there’s a car “the 3 second” in front of you.

Queen_of_the_Bun 11:27 pm 16 Dec 14

gazket said :

wildturkeycanoe said :

gazket said :

Why worry about whats behind you , you’ve already passed it. Keep an eye on whats in front.

Hand your driver’s license back to a Canberra Connect shopfront if you really believe this. You need to see what is coming from behind you so that:
– you won’t pull out in front of a vehicle moving faster than you when merging or changing lanes
– you can move aside and give way when emergency vehicles are coming from behind.
– you can keep an eye on the load of your trailer or utility
– you can ensure your children are not jumping all over the back seat instead of being securely strapped in
Mirrors aren’t just to hang fluffy dice or dream-catchers on, to put on makeup or to fix your hair.

really ? Did I say I ripped the mirrors out of my car and never use them. Of course I use my mirrors you bone heads. what has has one of your points have to do with a tailgater.

You were the one who said drivers shouldn’t be concerned about who’s behind them. Which most drivers use mirrors to discern.

You do sound like you have more sympathy with tailgaters than with people doing the speed limit.

gazket 4:10 pm 16 Dec 14

wildturkeycanoe said :

gazket said :

Why worry about whats behind you , you’ve already passed it. Keep an eye on whats in front.

Hand your driver’s license back to a Canberra Connect shopfront if you really believe this. You need to see what is coming from behind you so that:
– you won’t pull out in front of a vehicle moving faster than you when merging or changing lanes
– you can move aside and give way when emergency vehicles are coming from behind.
– you can keep an eye on the load of your trailer or utility
– you can ensure your children are not jumping all over the back seat instead of being securely strapped in
Mirrors aren’t just to hang fluffy dice or dream-catchers on, to put on makeup or to fix your hair.

really ? Did I say I ripped the mirrors out of my car and never use them. Of course I use my mirrors you bone heads. what has has one of your points have to do with a tailgater.

Holden Caulfield 1:34 pm 16 Dec 14

Turns out GrumpyMark is not so grumpy after all, rather he is SensibleMark.

Tenpoints 12:58 pm 16 Dec 14

I wonder if safety cameras could be set up to fine tailgaters by calculating the plate1 to plate2 time relative to the speed of the vehicles. It could easily be a significant revenue raiser, although being cut off at the check point could also result in a fine.

Nonetheless, tailgating is easy to spot and easy to measure for both humans and machines. Given the holistic increase in third party risk associated with this behaviour I am appalled it does not get called out more often as a contributing factor if not direct causation of many multi-vehicle traffic incidents.

We need to focus on this issue more as a community and call on police to take greater action reminding people to keep a safe following distance rather than perpetually banging on about speed limits.

GrumpyMark 11:19 am 16 Dec 14

I have been following this thread with interest and I am dumbfounded by the number of posters who seem to believe that tailgating is justifiable.

While another driver may, for whatever reason, decide to drive under the speed limit on a single lane carriageway or “block” the right hand lane on a two lane carriageway there can never be an excuse for turning an inconvenience into a dangerous driving situation.

The Tuggeranong Parkway is a tailgater’s paradise and I constantly see drivers aggressively sitting little more than a car’s length behind another driver trying to force them to speed up. To what end? So, as an earlier poster calculated, the tailgater can arrive at their destination a full 90 seconds earlier?

I, like many others, despise the arrogance of those who decide they will stay in the right hand lane simply because they can. However, I do not allow my annoyance to distract me from the all important task of driving safely. Rather I bask in the warmth of my moral superiority and pull over to the left lane (when safe to do so) and continue on, mindful that this person could wake up at any time and decide to move to the left. In situations such as this, it is far more important that at least one driver remains aware of the situation and adjusts their driving habit accordingly, for not to do so only increases the chances of an unfavourable incident.

Tailgating on a single lane carriageway is even more nonsensical. We need to remember that vehicle speedometers are not all correctly graduated. So while a driver may believe they are doing the speed limit, according to their speedometer, they may in reality be travelling a couple of k’s under the speed limit. And at the end of the day, that is fine.

I’m sure many of those posters who admit to tailgating would rank their driving ability quite highly on a scale of 1 to 10. They would be wrong. Driving is not only about demonstrating good physical skill but also about maintaining concentration and adjusting your driving to suit the conditions.

wildturkeycanoe 5:03 am 16 Dec 14

gazket said :

Why worry about whats behind you , you’ve already passed it. Keep an eye on whats in front.

Hand your driver’s license back to a Canberra Connect shopfront if you really believe this. You need to see what is coming from behind you so that:
– you won’t pull out in front of a vehicle moving faster than you when merging or changing lanes
– you can move aside and give way when emergency vehicles are coming from behind.
– you can keep an eye on the load of your trailer or utility
– you can ensure your children are not jumping all over the back seat instead of being securely strapped in
Mirrors aren’t just to hang fluffy dice or dream-catchers on, to put on makeup or to fix your hair.

Queen_of_the_Bun 11:37 pm 15 Dec 14

gazket said :

Why worry about whats behind you , you’ve already passed it. Keep an eye on whats in front.

Yes, who needs to keep an eye out for emergency vehicles coming up from behind which might need to pass you?

Little tip – there’s this crazy thing inside your car on the windscreen called a rear view mirror. Plus ones outside the car on either side. When people learn to drive, they are taught to check them regularly. Because you never know where danger may come from.

Queen_of_the_Bun 11:32 pm 15 Dec 14

VYBerlinaV8_is_back said :

Maya123 said :

watto23 said :

Evilomlap said :

Maya123 said :

magiccar9 said :

Evilomlap said :

Dothemo said :

I’ve been guilty of nasty driving in the past when in a hurry but now in my middle thirties I figure if I don’t want to be the victim of this conduct I must not do it to others. So I am a very calm passive driver and resist the temptation to get angry at others. If I make a mistake like accidentally cut someone off I always wave and apologize loudly and you watch it diffuse the situation. I have never tailgated others ever so when it happens to me I drop maybe 5 km under the speed limit and stay there – often the person will back off because perhaps they weren’t aware they were doing it to you? My advice is just let the anger go, it makes it worse for you. Just be the best driver you can be, be nice.

We need more drivers like you on the roads. I do exactly the same thing when tailgated and 9 times out of 10 the person simply backs off, either because like you said they haven’t realised they are doing it or because they realise their tailgating me is *not* going to make me speed up. The longer they tailgate me, the slower I go.

This is only fueling the situation… Why bother going even slower? Sure you might think you’re being a warrior of safety, but in actual fact you’re doing yourself a disservice. Not only are YOU now breaking the law by unnecessarily impeding traffic and traveling at an unsafe speed, but how many times has the tailgater actually backed off? Probably not often because you slowing down only means they’re even closer to the back of you. Then they get even more enraged at you, you get on your high and mighty soapbox and you have 2 distracted drivers instead of 1 tailgater. People like you need to stop playing games on the road and just concentrate on what’s in front of you. Grow up!

You wouldn’t be someone who tailgates by any chance? Your anger reads like you might be. Angry drivers are also a danger to themselves and others about them.
Dropping ones speed by a few kms per hour does not necessarily make for “an unsafe speed”. Driving at 95 rather than 100 for instance, or as possibly more likely, driving at 100 rather than 105. Please quote the law that says driving say at 95 in a 100 speed zone is breaking the law. The traffic that is being impeded according to you, is likely you who wants to speed. And damn it, those other drivers are on your road, in your road and you will show them by driving up their rear. Not you! Then why are you so angry?

I lightly touch my brakes several times. This passes the message on and is usually successful to get the silly twerp to back off. Because if I had to seriously apply my brakes, they would end up in the back of my car and knock my car down the road and likely into the trouble I was trying to avoid. Better to give that driver, who is possibly demonstrating they lack the intelligence to anticipate what can happen, a mild fright, than a big fright all round when they can’t stop before they plough into my car.

Great reply and thanks. Was my thoughts exactly. I love that these people think that driving slightly under the speed limit is somehow illegal and/or dangerous. It’s called a speed *limit* for a reason. For me, ‘driving to the conditions’ includes safely slowing down when tailgated by morons.

Again you are creating a more dangerous situation, so why the hell would you do that and stay in the situation. Ok I think a tap of the brakes is fine because the person may be a bit unattentive and it helps remind them, they are driving badly. But if they keep doing it, you are staying in a dangerous situation on the road and putting your life at risk. The person tailgating is a moron, but you aren’t exactly showing signs of intelligence by staying in a dangerous situation either.

I’m a amazed at how people will do all sorts of things to avoid risk off the road, yet on the road, act in a fashion that puts their lives at risk.

You say, “Again you are creating a more dangerous situation, so why the hell would you do that and stay in the situation.”

But you don’t make suggestions how to get out of it. It’s dangerous to slow and pull off the road, if that is at all possible, because that involves slowing and there is a good chance the tailgater will run into the back of the car in front. So that’s not a solution. And speeding up beyond the legal road speed limit is also dangerous (and illegal), and doesn’t guarantee the tailgater will stop tailgating anyway. So that’s not a solution. Your suggestions please.

Just spitballing here, but how about indicating left then slowing gently and moving over?

That only works if there are two lanes. Tailgaters are not restricted to terrorising right lane hogs. Plenty of drivers tailgate on one lane each way roads.

Maya123 6:58 pm 15 Dec 14

watto23 said :

Tenpoints said :

Watto23, if I had to pull over every time I got tailgated I may as well sell the car and walk. And while in some situations you’re right to take evasive action (e.g. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ao0v-vPHvs) the vast majority of people who commit tailgating offences are relatively low on the road rage spectrum and could simply benefit from a bit of retraining in driving etiquette and the consequences of accidents.

People should not be so scared of extremists as to go through life being bullied at every turn because they never stand up for themselves. This applies in all activities in life. In my opinion people should generally aim to be somewhere in the middle between absolute humility and complete self-righteousness.

I believe the safest way to respond to a tailgater in situations where you can’t pull over is to increase the gap to the vehicle in front such that you can accelerate and decelerate smoothly. Unless your moronic tailgater decides to deliberately ram you, the smooth and predictable driving you demonstrate will reduce both the likelihood and the severity of any rear end collision as the speed differential between the front and back cars will remain low.

I agree with you. The problem is there were a lot of people on this thread with a high and mighty attitude saying screw them I’ll sit in the right hand lane. It happens all the time in Canberra, it means people also undertake which is also dangerous. I’m happy for a bit of brake tapping to get them off your tail, I do it in my car and definitely on the bike because tailgating a motorcyclist basically means you want to kill the motorcyclist, but I generally don’t have an issue as I always move back into the left hand lane after overtaking rather than just sit there. I’d rather pull over and let a threat to myself go by than to maintain a dangerous situation. Fortunately it rarely happens and usually the tailgating is on dual lane roads so when it happens I’ll tap brake lights to tell them to back off, and move over when I can, just to avoid an idiot. It also reflects the lack of police on the roads, the difficulty of enforcing and booking people for tailgating as well.

Finally agree, you can’t let bullies run your life, but there are times, methods and places to deal with it.

I’m a traveller and I’ve been to many places considered slightly dangerous. I’m off to Jordan next year. I’m not going to let terrorists ruin my hobby or the lively hoods of those who depend on tourism. That said I’m not going to visit Iraq or Afghanistan. There are times and places to deal with these issues and make stands.

I just find the attitude of screw you I’m blocking the right hand lane because you tail gated me is a bad attitude to have and does nothing to help the situation, creates a dangerous situation and makes the person no better than the tailgater themselves. Bad situations usually start from simple innocuous situations.

“I just find the attitude of screw you I’m blocking the right hand lane”
Really! Not how I have read this. I think this is all in your mind. Please quote where people have said, “screw you I’m blocking the right hand lane.”

knuckles 5:59 pm 15 Dec 14

gazket said :

Why worry about whats behind you , you’ve already passed it. Keep an eye on whats in front.

When I did my advanced driving course, (work requirement) the instructors stated there are 9 areas we need to worry about.
Immediately in front of your vehicle
Moderate space in front of your vehicle
Far ahead of your vehicle
Left hand side
Right hand side
Left hand mirror
Right hand mirror
Rear vision mirror
Dashboard (speedo)

Scan through these 9 points and maintain a crash avoidance space with each allows for a very safe drive.

justin heywood 5:07 pm 15 Dec 14

watto23 said :

……The problem is there were a lot of people on this thread with a high and mighty attitude saying screw them I’ll sit in the right hand lane.

Show me one.

Tenpoints 5:03 pm 15 Dec 14

gazket said :

Why worry about whats behind you , you’ve already passed it. Keep an eye on whats in front.

Because whiplash is not a fun thing.

gazket 4:10 pm 15 Dec 14

Why worry about whats behind you , you’ve already passed it. Keep an eye on whats in front.

watto23 3:17 pm 15 Dec 14

Tenpoints said :

Watto23, if I had to pull over every time I got tailgated I may as well sell the car and walk. And while in some situations you’re right to take evasive action (e.g. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ao0v-vPHvs) the vast majority of people who commit tailgating offences are relatively low on the road rage spectrum and could simply benefit from a bit of retraining in driving etiquette and the consequences of accidents.

People should not be so scared of extremists as to go through life being bullied at every turn because they never stand up for themselves. This applies in all activities in life. In my opinion people should generally aim to be somewhere in the middle between absolute humility and complete self-righteousness.

I believe the safest way to respond to a tailgater in situations where you can’t pull over is to increase the gap to the vehicle in front such that you can accelerate and decelerate smoothly. Unless your moronic tailgater decides to deliberately ram you, the smooth and predictable driving you demonstrate will reduce both the likelihood and the severity of any rear end collision as the speed differential between the front and back cars will remain low.

I agree with you. The problem is there were a lot of people on this thread with a high and mighty attitude saying screw them I’ll sit in the right hand lane. It happens all the time in Canberra, it means people also undertake which is also dangerous. I’m happy for a bit of brake tapping to get them off your tail, I do it in my car and definitely on the bike because tailgating a motorcyclist basically means you want to kill the motorcyclist, but I generally don’t have an issue as I always move back into the left hand lane after overtaking rather than just sit there. I’d rather pull over and let a threat to myself go by than to maintain a dangerous situation. Fortunately it rarely happens and usually the tailgating is on dual lane roads so when it happens I’ll tap brake lights to tell them to back off, and move over when I can, just to avoid an idiot. It also reflects the lack of police on the roads, the difficulty of enforcing and booking people for tailgating as well.

Finally agree, you can’t let bullies run your life, but there are times, methods and places to deal with it.

I’m a traveller and I’ve been to many places considered slightly dangerous. I’m off to Jordan next year. I’m not going to let terrorists ruin my hobby or the lively hoods of those who depend on tourism. That said I’m not going to visit Iraq or Afghanistan. There are times and places to deal with these issues and make stands.

I just find the attitude of screw you I’m blocking the right hand lane because you tail gated me is a bad attitude to have and does nothing to help the situation, creates a dangerous situation and makes the person no better than the tailgater themselves. Bad situations usually start from simple innocuous situations.

Tenpoints 2:01 pm 15 Dec 14

Watto23, if I had to pull over every time I got tailgated I may as well sell the car and walk. And while in some situations you’re right to take evasive action (e.g. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ao0v-vPHvs) the vast majority of people who commit tailgating offences are relatively low on the road rage spectrum and could simply benefit from a bit of retraining in driving etiquette and the consequences of accidents.

People should not be so scared of extremists as to go through life being bullied at every turn because they never stand up for themselves. This applies in all activities in life. In my opinion people should generally aim to be somewhere in the middle between absolute humility and complete self-righteousness.

I believe the safest way to respond to a tailgater in situations where you can’t pull over is to increase the gap to the vehicle in front such that you can accelerate and decelerate smoothly. Unless your moronic tailgater decides to deliberately ram you, the smooth and predictable driving you demonstrate will reduce both the likelihood and the severity of any rear end collision as the speed differential between the front and back cars will remain low.

VYBerlinaV8_is_back 1:20 pm 15 Dec 14

Maya123 said :

watto23 said :

Evilomlap said :

Maya123 said :

magiccar9 said :

Evilomlap said :

Dothemo said :

I’ve been guilty of nasty driving in the past when in a hurry but now in my middle thirties I figure if I don’t want to be the victim of this conduct I must not do it to others. So I am a very calm passive driver and resist the temptation to get angry at others. If I make a mistake like accidentally cut someone off I always wave and apologize loudly and you watch it diffuse the situation. I have never tailgated others ever so when it happens to me I drop maybe 5 km under the speed limit and stay there – often the person will back off because perhaps they weren’t aware they were doing it to you? My advice is just let the anger go, it makes it worse for you. Just be the best driver you can be, be nice.

We need more drivers like you on the roads. I do exactly the same thing when tailgated and 9 times out of 10 the person simply backs off, either because like you said they haven’t realised they are doing it or because they realise their tailgating me is *not* going to make me speed up. The longer they tailgate me, the slower I go.

This is only fueling the situation… Why bother going even slower? Sure you might think you’re being a warrior of safety, but in actual fact you’re doing yourself a disservice. Not only are YOU now breaking the law by unnecessarily impeding traffic and traveling at an unsafe speed, but how many times has the tailgater actually backed off? Probably not often because you slowing down only means they’re even closer to the back of you. Then they get even more enraged at you, you get on your high and mighty soapbox and you have 2 distracted drivers instead of 1 tailgater. People like you need to stop playing games on the road and just concentrate on what’s in front of you. Grow up!

You wouldn’t be someone who tailgates by any chance? Your anger reads like you might be. Angry drivers are also a danger to themselves and others about them.
Dropping ones speed by a few kms per hour does not necessarily make for “an unsafe speed”. Driving at 95 rather than 100 for instance, or as possibly more likely, driving at 100 rather than 105. Please quote the law that says driving say at 95 in a 100 speed zone is breaking the law. The traffic that is being impeded according to you, is likely you who wants to speed. And damn it, those other drivers are on your road, in your road and you will show them by driving up their rear. Not you! Then why are you so angry?

I lightly touch my brakes several times. This passes the message on and is usually successful to get the silly twerp to back off. Because if I had to seriously apply my brakes, they would end up in the back of my car and knock my car down the road and likely into the trouble I was trying to avoid. Better to give that driver, who is possibly demonstrating they lack the intelligence to anticipate what can happen, a mild fright, than a big fright all round when they can’t stop before they plough into my car.

Great reply and thanks. Was my thoughts exactly. I love that these people think that driving slightly under the speed limit is somehow illegal and/or dangerous. It’s called a speed *limit* for a reason. For me, ‘driving to the conditions’ includes safely slowing down when tailgated by morons.

Again you are creating a more dangerous situation, so why the hell would you do that and stay in the situation. Ok I think a tap of the brakes is fine because the person may be a bit unattentive and it helps remind them, they are driving badly. But if they keep doing it, you are staying in a dangerous situation on the road and putting your life at risk. The person tailgating is a moron, but you aren’t exactly showing signs of intelligence by staying in a dangerous situation either.

I’m a amazed at how people will do all sorts of things to avoid risk off the road, yet on the road, act in a fashion that puts their lives at risk.

You say, “Again you are creating a more dangerous situation, so why the hell would you do that and stay in the situation.”

But you don’t make suggestions how to get out of it. It’s dangerous to slow and pull off the road, if that is at all possible, because that involves slowing and there is a good chance the tailgater will run into the back of the car in front. So that’s not a solution. And speeding up beyond the legal road speed limit is also dangerous (and illegal), and doesn’t guarantee the tailgater will stop tailgating anyway. So that’s not a solution. Your suggestions please.

Just spitballing here, but how about indicating left then slowing gently and moving over?

Evilomlap 1:07 pm 15 Dec 14

Thanks again, Maya123. I hope I encounter sensible people like yourself when I’m out driving next as opposed to the ‘experts’ in both driving skill and personality assessment who have commented on this thread.

Maya123 12:10 pm 15 Dec 14

watto23 said :

Evilomlap said :

Maya123 said :

magiccar9 said :

Evilomlap said :

Dothemo said :

I’ve been guilty of nasty driving in the past when in a hurry but now in my middle thirties I figure if I don’t want to be the victim of this conduct I must not do it to others. So I am a very calm passive driver and resist the temptation to get angry at others. If I make a mistake like accidentally cut someone off I always wave and apologize loudly and you watch it diffuse the situation. I have never tailgated others ever so when it happens to me I drop maybe 5 km under the speed limit and stay there – often the person will back off because perhaps they weren’t aware they were doing it to you? My advice is just let the anger go, it makes it worse for you. Just be the best driver you can be, be nice.

We need more drivers like you on the roads. I do exactly the same thing when tailgated and 9 times out of 10 the person simply backs off, either because like you said they haven’t realised they are doing it or because they realise their tailgating me is *not* going to make me speed up. The longer they tailgate me, the slower I go.

This is only fueling the situation… Why bother going even slower? Sure you might think you’re being a warrior of safety, but in actual fact you’re doing yourself a disservice. Not only are YOU now breaking the law by unnecessarily impeding traffic and traveling at an unsafe speed, but how many times has the tailgater actually backed off? Probably not often because you slowing down only means they’re even closer to the back of you. Then they get even more enraged at you, you get on your high and mighty soapbox and you have 2 distracted drivers instead of 1 tailgater. People like you need to stop playing games on the road and just concentrate on what’s in front of you. Grow up!

You wouldn’t be someone who tailgates by any chance? Your anger reads like you might be. Angry drivers are also a danger to themselves and others about them.
Dropping ones speed by a few kms per hour does not necessarily make for “an unsafe speed”. Driving at 95 rather than 100 for instance, or as possibly more likely, driving at 100 rather than 105. Please quote the law that says driving say at 95 in a 100 speed zone is breaking the law. The traffic that is being impeded according to you, is likely you who wants to speed. And damn it, those other drivers are on your road, in your road and you will show them by driving up their rear. Not you! Then why are you so angry?

I lightly touch my brakes several times. This passes the message on and is usually successful to get the silly twerp to back off. Because if I had to seriously apply my brakes, they would end up in the back of my car and knock my car down the road and likely into the trouble I was trying to avoid. Better to give that driver, who is possibly demonstrating they lack the intelligence to anticipate what can happen, a mild fright, than a big fright all round when they can’t stop before they plough into my car.

Great reply and thanks. Was my thoughts exactly. I love that these people think that driving slightly under the speed limit is somehow illegal and/or dangerous. It’s called a speed *limit* for a reason. For me, ‘driving to the conditions’ includes safely slowing down when tailgated by morons.

Again you are creating a more dangerous situation, so why the hell would you do that and stay in the situation. Ok I think a tap of the brakes is fine because the person may be a bit unattentive and it helps remind them, they are driving badly. But if they keep doing it, you are staying in a dangerous situation on the road and putting your life at risk. The person tailgating is a moron, but you aren’t exactly showing signs of intelligence by staying in a dangerous situation either.

I’m a amazed at how people will do all sorts of things to avoid risk off the road, yet on the road, act in a fashion that puts their lives at risk.

You say, “Again you are creating a more dangerous situation, so why the hell would you do that and stay in the situation.”

But you don’t make suggestions how to get out of it. It’s dangerous to slow and pull off the road, if that is at all possible, because that involves slowing and there is a good chance the tailgater will run into the back of the car in front. So that’s not a solution. And speeding up beyond the legal road speed limit is also dangerous (and illegal), and doesn’t guarantee the tailgater will stop tailgating anyway. So that’s not a solution. Your suggestions please.

watto23 10:38 am 15 Dec 14

Evilomlap said :

Maya123 said :

magiccar9 said :

Evilomlap said :

Dothemo said :

I’ve been guilty of nasty driving in the past when in a hurry but now in my middle thirties I figure if I don’t want to be the victim of this conduct I must not do it to others. So I am a very calm passive driver and resist the temptation to get angry at others. If I make a mistake like accidentally cut someone off I always wave and apologize loudly and you watch it diffuse the situation. I have never tailgated others ever so when it happens to me I drop maybe 5 km under the speed limit and stay there – often the person will back off because perhaps they weren’t aware they were doing it to you? My advice is just let the anger go, it makes it worse for you. Just be the best driver you can be, be nice.

We need more drivers like you on the roads. I do exactly the same thing when tailgated and 9 times out of 10 the person simply backs off, either because like you said they haven’t realised they are doing it or because they realise their tailgating me is *not* going to make me speed up. The longer they tailgate me, the slower I go.

This is only fueling the situation… Why bother going even slower? Sure you might think you’re being a warrior of safety, but in actual fact you’re doing yourself a disservice. Not only are YOU now breaking the law by unnecessarily impeding traffic and traveling at an unsafe speed, but how many times has the tailgater actually backed off? Probably not often because you slowing down only means they’re even closer to the back of you. Then they get even more enraged at you, you get on your high and mighty soapbox and you have 2 distracted drivers instead of 1 tailgater. People like you need to stop playing games on the road and just concentrate on what’s in front of you. Grow up!

You wouldn’t be someone who tailgates by any chance? Your anger reads like you might be. Angry drivers are also a danger to themselves and others about them.
Dropping ones speed by a few kms per hour does not necessarily make for “an unsafe speed”. Driving at 95 rather than 100 for instance, or as possibly more likely, driving at 100 rather than 105. Please quote the law that says driving say at 95 in a 100 speed zone is breaking the law. The traffic that is being impeded according to you, is likely you who wants to speed. And damn it, those other drivers are on your road, in your road and you will show them by driving up their rear. Not you! Then why are you so angry?

I lightly touch my brakes several times. This passes the message on and is usually successful to get the silly twerp to back off. Because if I had to seriously apply my brakes, they would end up in the back of my car and knock my car down the road and likely into the trouble I was trying to avoid. Better to give that driver, who is possibly demonstrating they lack the intelligence to anticipate what can happen, a mild fright, than a big fright all round when they can’t stop before they plough into my car.

Great reply and thanks. Was my thoughts exactly. I love that these people think that driving slightly under the speed limit is somehow illegal and/or dangerous. It’s called a speed *limit* for a reason. For me, ‘driving to the conditions’ includes safely slowing down when tailgated by morons.

Again you are creating a more dangerous situation, so why the hell would you do that and stay in the situation. Ok I think a tap of the brakes is fine because the person may be a bit unattentive and it helps remind them, they are driving badly. But if they keep doing it, you are staying in a dangerous situation on the road and putting your life at risk. The person tailgating is a moron, but you aren’t exactly showing signs of intelligence by staying in a dangerous situation either.

I’m a amazed at how people will do all sorts of things to avoid risk off the road, yet on the road, act in a fashion that puts their lives at risk.

Related Articles

CBR Tweets

Sign up to our newsletter

Top
Copyright © 2018 Riot ACT Holdings Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.
the-riotact.com | aboutregional.com.au | b2bmagazine.com.au | thisiscanberra.com

Search across the site