Skip to content Skip to main navigation

News

Skilled legal advice with
accessible & personal attention

The last days of the Belconnen Bus Interchange

By johnboy - 8 January 2014 22

Four years later the Belconnen Community Service has brought to YouTube the cinematic tale of the last days of the Belconnen Bus Interchange:

In2Change – Belconnen Bus Interchange (1979 – 2009)

Published on 2 Jan 2014

A short film by Cara Hine – An Artistic Response to Urban Change

screenshot

What’s Your opinion?


Post a comment
Please login to post your comments, or connect with
22 Responses to
The last days of the Belconnen Bus Interchange
La_Tour_Maubourg 12:53 pm 09 Jan 14

What a shame the unique buildings in Belconnen that once graced Benjamin Way (and Chandler St) have slowly been demolished. What’s wrong with refurbishing the exteriors? Thanks to all who don’t appreciate the architecture we will have nothing but cold, generic, glassy grey buildings and Belconnen Town Centre will look nothing different to anywhere else. The only thing wrong with the previous interchange and associated walkways is a good old fashioned high pressure clean and a replacement of perspex paneling were required.

Instant Mash 12:45 pm 09 Jan 14

I’m pretty sure the only people that use it’s replacement (I use that term loosely) are Uni students. Everyone else just goes to the Westfield one because it’s far more convenient.

Honestly, they may as well have put a regular road in it’s place.

Onceler 12:12 pm 09 Jan 14

random said :

johnboy said :

I think belconnen bus users still miss it compared to what replaced it?

Hardly anyone uses the “community bus station” in the location of the old one, but the new interchange at Belconnen Mall is fantastic. Very convenient to pop into the supermarket to pick up some milk or bread or whatever on the way home, much more convenient to have 2 platforms than 10, and can sit inside and/or get a coffee if you have a long wait.

I was initially skeptical but now I think it was a really great move.

Sounds like it’s working ok then. Not having ever used it, I shouldn’t have criticised. My bad.

Onceler 11:55 am 09 Jan 14

banco said :

God that place was a hole. Like Eastern bloc architecture.

Don’t knock the eastern bloc! The Soviets did some amazing stuff; really adventurous designs. Get a hold of this book if you can:

http://www.taschen.com/pages/en/catalogue/photography/all/05744/facts.frederic_chaubin_cosmic_communist_constructions_photographed.htm

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2011/feb/27/cosmic-communist-constructions-frederic-chaubin

And from what I’ve heard, the new Belco Bus interchange is pretty bad: designed to meet Westfield’s needs rather than those of bus commuters.

Thumper 11:33 am 09 Jan 14

cmdwedge said :

Thumper said :

Horrible, cold, grey, depressing piece of brutalist architecture.

I’m surprised it lasted as long as it did.

When I moved to Canberra 11 years ago, I remember looking up at the Cameron Offices and saying ‘this is literally the most depressing building that I’ve ever seen’ and a colleague told me that it had won awards. I was gobsmacked.

Brutalism is dead. Demolish it all and start over.

Having said that, I used to have to wander by the old Boardroom to get the to interchange. Always good to suck down a few schooies before catching the bus home 🙂

random 11:06 am 09 Jan 14

johnboy said :

I think belconnen bus users still miss it compared to what replaced it?

Hardly anyone uses the “community bus station” in the location of the old one, but the new interchange at Belconnen Mall is fantastic. Very convenient to pop into the supermarket to pick up some milk or bread or whatever on the way home, much more convenient to have 2 platforms than 10, and can sit inside and/or get a coffee if you have a long wait.

I was initially skeptical but now I think it was a really great move.

cmdwedge 11:05 am 09 Jan 14

Thumper said :

Horrible, cold, grey, depressing piece of brutalist architecture.

I’m surprised it lasted as long as it did.

When I moved to Canberra 11 years ago, I remember looking up at the Cameron Offices and saying ‘this is literally the most depressing building that I’ve ever seen’ and a colleague told me that it had won awards. I was gobsmacked.

Brutalism is dead. Demolish it all and start over.

Holden Caulfield 10:34 am 09 Jan 14

Onceler said :

I really like brutalist architecture. I think it gets a bad rap for no good reason. The term ‘brutalism’ is an unfortunate one though… but apparently it is derived from the French béton brut, or ‘raw concrete’.

I agree. The NGA is one of my favourite buildings in Canberra.

Thumper 10:04 am 09 Jan 14

johnboy said :

I think belconnen bus users still miss it compared to what replaced it?

Well, to be honest, I haven’t caught a bus this century. Having said that, the new Belco exchange is nothing more than a glorified road.

johnboy 9:38 am 09 Jan 14

I think belconnen bus users still miss it compared to what replaced it?

Thumper 9:30 am 09 Jan 14

Horrible, cold, grey, depressing piece of brutalist architecture.

I’m surprised it lasted as long as it did.

Onceler 8:01 am 09 Jan 14

I really like brutalist architecture. I think it gets a bad rap for no good reason. The term ‘brutalism’ is an unfortunate one though… but apparently it is derived from the French béton brut, or ‘raw concrete’.

Those immense concrete forms are quite attractive and give a feeling of solidity and permanence. Australia has had some fine examples of the style – http://www.twentieth.org.au/brutalism.html

JC 7:11 am 09 Jan 14

c_c™ said :

Brutalist more specifically, the same nasty style in vogue for a while that gave us the awful National Gallery until they fixed it. What I don’t understand is why the covered walkways were at some point enclosed in such a tacky way. They were originally open at the sides, and then they added those terrible, frosted polycarbonate panels to enclose them that over the years grew filthier while blocking out the vistas over the lake and park, as if designed to amplify the sterility and claustrophobia.

Yes and no in relation to the enclosed walkways. Part of the walkway towards the mall always had always been enclosed, thinking the bit from the building that original contained the control room to the first bus bays. Now not sure if you remember but the ramp and stairs down to Benjamin Way were not part of the original interchange, being added later. When they added these is when they continued the poly down the walkway though I recall only on the lake side. Also it was clear (maybe tinted) to start with and started to frost and go white over time. So maybe a good idea at the time to keep the wind out, but with hindsight poorly done.

c_c™ 11:07 pm 08 Jan 14

banco said :

God that place was a hole. Like Eastern bloc architecture.

Brutalist more specifically, the same nasty style in vogue for a while that gave us the awful National Gallery until they fixed it. What I don’t understand is why the covered walkways were at some point enclosed in such a tacky way. They were originally open at the sides, and then they added those terrible, frosted polycarbonate panels to enclose them that over the years grew filthier while blocking out the vistas over the lake and park, as if designed to amplify the sterility and claustrophobia.

banco 10:19 pm 08 Jan 14

God that place was a hole. Like Eastern bloc architecture.

Related Articles

CBR Tweets

Sign up to our newsletter

Top
Copyright © 2017 Riot ACT Holdings Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.
www.the-riotact.com | www.b2bmagazine.com.au | www.thisiscanberra.com

Search across the site