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Home loans made clear

Tralee (Canberra’s own Lucas Heights) starts selling.

By farq 17 February 2014 67

image from The Canberra Times

Affordable Tralee a boon for buyers Canberra Times puff piece: http://www.canberratimes.com.au/act-news/affordable-tralee-a-boon-for-buyers-20140216-32u7u.html

It’s interesting that the article does not mention the airport noise issue at all. If history is any guide, the residents will start complaining by the time their first rate bill arrives.

When the flight path gets moved over Canberra, everyone should remember the Villains Village Building Company’s contribution to our fair city.

What’s Your opinion?


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67 Responses to
Tralee (Canberra’s own Lucas Heights) starts selling.
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Diggety 5:42 pm 24 Feb 14

Deref said :

switch said :

Diggety said :

I don’t understand the Lucas Heights comparison.

I think it is alluding to the fact that the nuclear research reactor at Lucas Heights, built back in the fifties, well and truly predated anyone buying land there now. Sydney was a lot further away in those days.

Yes, and to the fact that the people who bought land near the reactor immediately started complaining about it.

The worst kind of NIMBY…

neanderthalsis 4:13 pm 24 Feb 14

To quote from the great Strayne film, the Castle: “He say plane fly overhead, drop value. I don’t care. In Beirut, plane fly over, drop bomb. I like these planes.”

watto23 10:39 am 24 Feb 14

I’ve seen enough episodes of Air Crash Investigation to know living under a flight path is a bad idea 🙂
I’m looking forward to the upcoming episode on QF32.

RadioVK 1:25 pm 23 Feb 14

IrishPete said :

JC said :

Sorry not this time.

A curfew isn’t a total ban on something, it is a time when there are restrictions on certain movements. That description fits Sydney perfectly and indeed it is enacted by law, a law called the Sydney Curfew Act 1995.

http://www.comlaw.gov.au/Details/C2006C00603/Download

To show the difference between a curfew and a noise abatement procedure, one just needs to look at Canberra Airport. Noise abatement is a policy and matching set of procedures that requires aircraft to fly certain predefined routes, not be below certain heights at given points and where possible arrive between certain times on certain runways.

Noise abatement is not a law where one can get fined, unlike the Sydney airport curfew, it is simple a policy and procedure that they intend to follow when they can.

So no apology from me this time, but in the past when proven wrong I have apologised or have self placed myself in the naughty corner and kept quiet, rather than making a tool of myself.

So a curfew is what the Commonwealth Government says it is? Fair enough. Perhaps it should be Curfew and the rest of us can continue to use curfew. (I can’t resist mentioning 1984 and NewSpeak.)

I had a quick check to see if any airports’ noise abatement is legislated, e.g. by State/Territory law or local government. Couldn’t find an answer (Melbourne seems to be “no”, and then I got bored). If it is legislated, or part of the conditions attached to a DA and therefore legally enforceable, then it has similar status to the Feds’ Curfew legislation, just enforced by a different body.

IP

Noise Abatement/Curfews, along with all other flight procedures, are legislated and enforced by CASA at the Federal level.

RadioVK 1:18 pm 23 Feb 14

JC said :

Noise abatement is not a law where one can get fined, unlike the Sydney airport curfew, it is simple a policy and procedure that they intend to follow when they can.

http://www.boeing.com/commercial/noise/sydney.html

Penalty for violating flight corridors is $25k.

Noise Abatement Procedures are mandatory, and legally enforceable.

JC 11:51 am 23 Feb 14

IrishPete said :

So a curfew is what the Commonwealth Government says it is? Fair enough. Perhaps it should be Curfew and the rest of us can continue to use curfew. (I can’t resist mentioning 1984 and NewSpeak.)
IP

No it isn’t because the Commonwealth Government says so, it is because the word curfew means to RESTRICT movement, not ban, which is what you appear to believe it means going by your comments here. Did you miss that part in my post?

IrishPete 9:49 am 23 Feb 14

JC said :

Sorry not this time.

A curfew isn’t a total ban on something, it is a time when there are restrictions on certain movements. That description fits Sydney perfectly and indeed it is enacted by law, a law called the Sydney Curfew Act 1995.

http://www.comlaw.gov.au/Details/C2006C00603/Download

To show the difference between a curfew and a noise abatement procedure, one just needs to look at Canberra Airport. Noise abatement is a policy and matching set of procedures that requires aircraft to fly certain predefined routes, not be below certain heights at given points and where possible arrive between certain times on certain runways.

Noise abatement is not a law where one can get fined, unlike the Sydney airport curfew, it is simple a policy and procedure that they intend to follow when they can.

So no apology from me this time, but in the past when proven wrong I have apologised or have self placed myself in the naughty corner and kept quiet, rather than making a tool of myself.

So a curfew is what the Commonwealth Government says it is? Fair enough. Perhaps it should be Curfew and the rest of us can continue to use curfew. (I can’t resist mentioning 1984 and NewSpeak.)

I had a quick check to see if any airports’ noise abatement is legislated, e.g. by State/Territory law or local government. Couldn’t find an answer (Melbourne seems to be “no”, and then I got bored). If it is legislated, or part of the conditions attached to a DA and therefore legally enforceable, then it has similar status to the Feds’ Curfew legislation, just enforced by a different body.

IP

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