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65 deadbeats busted in four days by RAPID

By johnboy - 26 February 2011 17

Over the past four days, ACT Policing’s Recognition and Analysis of Plates IDentified (RAPID) team has detected 65 unregistered vehicles.

From the 26,000 vehicles scanned, RAPID also identified 33 uninsured vehicles, 16 defective vehicles and seven unlicensed drivers. In addition, 50 infringements were issued for other traffic related offences.

Among the vehicles detected this week were a 2009 Mercedes Benz C180 sedan, 2010 Toyota Kluger station wagon and a 2010 Mitsubishi Lancer sedan, all of which were unregistered and uninsured.

The RAPID team also arrested a male driver yesterday (Thursday, 24 February) for driving while disqualified. The man had been detected by the RAPID team for the same offence in August last year.

Superintendent Mark Colbran from Traffic Operations said results like this should remind the Canberra community of the importance of ensuring your vehicle’s registration is current, and your vehicle is insured.

“A RAPID flyer will soon be distributed with all ACT registration renewals as a reminder for motorists of the financial consequences of not registering your vehicle on time,” Superintendent Colbran said.

“Driving a vehicle just one day out of registration makes you liable to a minimum fine of $543. Two weeks out of registration and the fine increases to $1,086. With our dedicated RAPID team operating 365 days a year, why risk getting caught when it is cheaper to just pay your registration when it is due?”

A RAPID vehicle will also be on display at the Royal Canberra Show this weekend demonstrating the capabilities of the RAPID technology.

[Courtesy ACT Policing]

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17 Responses to
65 deadbeats busted in four days by RAPID
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Tooks 12:18 pm 01 Mar 11

Keijidosha said :

Tooks said :

Keijidosha said :

I’m curious about the statistic of 16 defective vehicles identified. If these were vehicles previously issued with a defective vehicle notice then they are either operating legally within the 14 day grace period, or this period has elapsed, in which case the registration is cancelled and they become unregistered vehicles. Ergo the statistic is potentially useless, or misleading.

What? Who said they were previously issued with a defect notice? These are cars that were stopped and found to be defective, therefore they were given defect notices.

In which case the article is misleading as it suggests defective vehicles were discovered through scanning by RAPID, not by physical inspection.

I see what you mean now. The RAPID team identified the defective vehicles – that’s how I read it anyway.

Keijidosha 11:42 am 01 Mar 11

Tooks said :

Keijidosha said :

I’m curious about the statistic of 16 defective vehicles identified. If these were vehicles previously issued with a defective vehicle notice then they are either operating legally within the 14 day grace period, or this period has elapsed, in which case the registration is cancelled and they become unregistered vehicles. Ergo the statistic is potentially useless, or misleading.

What? Who said they were previously issued with a defect notice? These are cars that were stopped and found to be defective, therefore they were given defect notices.

In which case the article is misleading as it suggests defective vehicles were discovered through scanning by RAPID, not by physical inspection.

Tooks 10:24 am 01 Mar 11

Keijidosha said :

I’m curious about the statistic of 16 defective vehicles identified. If these were vehicles previously issued with a defective vehicle notice then they are either operating legally within the 14 day grace period, or this period has elapsed, in which case the registration is cancelled and they become unregistered vehicles. Ergo the statistic is potentially useless, or misleading.

What? Who said they were previously issued with a defect notice? These are cars that were stopped and found to be defective, therefore they were given defect notices.

p1 9:58 am 01 Mar 11

drewbytes said :

Beef said :

Doesnt make sense. Without forced rego checks its just revenue??

What doesn’t make sense? So they should just let people drive around unregistered and uninsured and do nothing about it? The fact is unregistered/uninsured vehicles are only a small fraction of the cars on the road but they are over-represented in fatal crashes (as also are alcohol impaired drivers).

I think Beef was referring to the paying of the rego component, yet there being no compulsory check of roadworthiness, and therefore no reason why my legally registered 20 year old subaru is any more roadworthy then his 20 year old uninsured crumpledoor?

Keijidosha 9:57 am 01 Mar 11

I’m curious about the statistic of 16 defective vehicles identified. If these were vehicles previously issued with a defective vehicle notice then they are either operating legally within the 14 day grace period, or this period has elapsed, in which case the registration is cancelled and they become unregistered vehicles. Ergo the statistic is potentially useless, or misleading.

Thoroughly Smashed 9:45 am 01 Mar 11

Beef said :

Doesnt make sense. Without forced rego checks its just revenue??

Is this a problem for you?

drewbytes 9:42 am 01 Mar 11

BTW the RAPID team quite often work with the Rego ACT inspectors so as RAPID are pulling in vehicles the inspectors are checking they are roadworthy.

drewbytes 9:06 am 01 Mar 11

Beef said :

Doesnt make sense. Without forced rego checks its just revenue??

What doesn’t make sense? So they should just let people drive around unregistered and uninsured and do nothing about it? The fact is unregistered/uninsured vehicles are only a small fraction of the cars on the road but they are over-represented in fatal crashes (as also are alcohol impaired drivers).

Beef 10:21 pm 28 Feb 11

Doesnt make sense. Without forced rego checks its just revenue??

p1 5:02 pm 28 Feb 11

AG Canberra said :

Given that our rego and insurance is wrapped up in one easy payment how can you be rego’d but have no insurance (or vice versa)?

Are these “over the border” people?

When your ACT rego expires, the CTP is still valid for a week or so. Which explains this…

“Driving a vehicle just one day out of registration makes you liable to a minimum fine of $543. Two weeks out of registration and the fine increases to $1,086.

It is interesting that only 33 of the 65 were also uninsured. So basically half the people caught might have genuinely just not noticed, while the other half either are intentionally driving unregistered, or are so out of touch as to not notice…

willo 4:49 pm 28 Feb 11

uninsured refers to ctpi in the act your third party insurance is valid for 14 days after the expiry of registration

buzz819 4:48 pm 28 Feb 11

AG Canberra said :

Given that our rego and insurance is wrapped up in one easy payment how can you be rego’d but have no insurance (or vice versa)?

Are these “over the border” people?

When your rego runs out your car is still covered by CTP for a further 14 days….

EvanJames 4:14 pm 28 Feb 11

I think they’re uninsured because, if driving their car unregistered, their own insurance is no longer valid ie insurance company will gleefully back out of paying because driver was unregistered. Same as if they are drunk when they crash, insurance company won’t pay for anything.

AG Canberra 4:07 pm 28 Feb 11

Given that our rego and insurance is wrapped up in one easy payment how can you be rego’d but have no insurance (or vice versa)?

Are these “over the border” people?

longshanks 3:19 pm 28 Feb 11

They’re probably unelected too… I sure wouldn’t vote for them.

LSWCHP 4:59 pm 27 Feb 11

LSWCHP said :

If you get collected by the unelected and uninsured, you’re in trouble, so getting them off the road benefits everybody.

.

Gaack…did I really write “unelected”? Let’s substitute something sensible like “unregistered” in there.

Dunno what I was thinking at the time.

LSWCHP 2:33 pm 27 Feb 11

Good on th cops. If you get collected by the unelected and uninsured, you’re in trouble, so getting them off the road benefits everybody.

What surprises me is that people driving flash rides like Mercs and Klugers are at this game. I wonder what’s going on there?

And it seems that for some people, after the slap on the wrist they just get back in their unregistered/uninsured vehicles and drive away. I’d give ’em a month in the slammer.

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