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Labor promises ‘off’ switches

By Jazz - 12 October 2012 31

In my week highlighting what I consider to be impractical election promises that are unlikely to be implemented without a majority government i’ve decided to share Labor’s plan to save everyone money on energy use.

The plan is to provide you some online tools (which incidentally are already available from the Home Energy Advice Team and also legislate a single off switch for all non essential appliances in new homes. Knowing, in advance of course, what non essential appliances you might plug into each and every power point in your home.

Good plan or not?

What’s Your opinion?


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31 Responses to
Labor promises ‘off’ switches
Thumper 9:25 pm 12 Oct 12

IrishPete said :

Thumper said :

Skidbladnir said :

1) This is a shit idea, and a heavy-handed policy solution to something that is behavioural in nature.
2) In the non-essential classification, some devices are more essential than others. How does this scheme deal with such granularity?
3) How is this different from a circuitboard?
4) This isn’t a ‘saving’ as the media release suggests, its a cost avoidance. As per the media release logic, if we could all just tear out any electrical cabling, burn down the internet, and live out the 15th century all over again, we’d save billions on electricity expenditure.

My house has a mains switch. When I flick it off I use no power whatsoever.

I guess that Katy is talking about doing this.

Fuck me…

Yes, very clever Peeps.

My house’s switches/circuitboard are in the meter box, outside, often in the dark, rain and cold. While Ms Gallagher’s idea may be a bit of overkillswitch, it’s just as silly to say that this already exists in houses. It doesn’t.

IP

Well turn everything off. You know, it’s not that difficult, really.

Dark, rain and cold. Seriously, if you’re that worried buy a torch and brave the scary outdoors.

c_c 8:56 pm 12 Oct 12

Truly the most ridiculous, impractical and useless policy I’ve heard announced yet.

a) Most of those appliances that draw phantom power or are left on, tend to need to be that way to retain settings.

b) If people can’t be bother turning those that can be turned off already, what makes them think they’ll bother with this switch – particularly as they’ll need to turn it on and off every time they need to use one of the ‘non-essential’ devices.

c) You can already buy powerboards that are individually switched, and relatively inexpensive smart adaptors that offer more flexibility and scalability.

IrishPete 8:50 pm 12 Oct 12

Thumper said :

Skidbladnir said :

1) This is a shit idea, and a heavy-handed policy solution to something that is behavioural in nature.
2) In the non-essential classification, some devices are more essential than others. How does this scheme deal with such granularity?
3) How is this different from a circuitboard?
4) This isn’t a ‘saving’ as the media release suggests, its a cost avoidance. As per the media release logic, if we could all just tear out any electrical cabling, burn down the internet, and live out the 15th century all over again, we’d save billions on electricity expenditure.

My house has a mains switch. When I flick it off I use no power whatsoever.

I guess that Katy is talking about doing this.

Fuck me…

Yes, very clever Peeps.

My house’s switches/circuitboard are in the meter box, outside, often in the dark, rain and cold. While Ms Gallagher’s idea may be a bit of overkillswitch, it’s just as silly to say that this already exists in houses. It doesn’t.

IP

Innovation 8:39 pm 12 Oct 12

I have often wondered about this idea and don’t think it is really all that bad an initiative. Hotels have been doing this for years (so they have obviously justified the cost savings). The cost for a mains switch near the front door would not be significant and it might even be justifiable to have a switch at the entrance to every or most rooms. If you don’t like the idea in your new house don’t turn the switch off.

Apart from the clock issue above (which I think is an appliance design flaw and should be automatically set by satellite) not many appliances need constant power (eg fridge, freezer, security systems, telephone answering machine and possibly web servers. Other timer based systems (heaters, ovens, kitchen appliances, PVRs etc) might need power occasionally when you’re not home and some forethought might be needed for other appliances left running when you go out (dishwashers, washing machines etc).

If you don’t like this idea, perhaps another option would be to make all cabling for data and power plumbing in conduits external to the wall (eg behind removable cornices, skirtings and architraves). People might then be less reticent about reworking or retrofitting services as times change.

HenryBG 8:28 pm 12 Oct 12

Stupid idea.

This is like the man-with-the-red-flag-who-had-to-walk-ahead-of-a-motorvehicle-on-a-public-road kind of idea.

We now have http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_of_Things

You don’t need physical infrastructure to manage your power usage.

Thumper 7:48 pm 12 Oct 12

Skidbladnir said :

1) This is a shit idea, and a heavy-handed policy solution to something that is behavioural in nature.
2) In the non-essential classification, some devices are more essential than others. How does this scheme deal with such granularity?
3) How is this different from a circuitboard?
4) This isn’t a ‘saving’ as the media release suggests, its a cost avoidance. As per the media release logic, if we could all just tear out any electrical cabling, burn down the internet, and live out the 15th century all over again, we’d save billions on electricity expenditure.

My house has a mains switch. When I flick it off I use no power whatsoever.

I guess that Katy is talking about doing this.

Fuck me…

p1 7:39 pm 12 Oct 12

Biggles, old chap, that is a top idea. Pip pip and what!

Thumper 7:25 pm 12 Oct 12

I have no words.

Seriously.

The government is going to give us an on/off switch?

‘Scuse me while I laugh. Lots.

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd 7:04 pm 12 Oct 12

Little_Green_Bag said :

When I saw the head of this story I thought you were referring to Conroy’s Internet censorship plans.

Labor hasn’t dumped this policy, it’s just on hold and a little bird has told me that if Australians are stupid enough to re-elect Gillard next year it will be going through within weeks of the election.

Liar. It has been proven that such a filter is ineffective and only will work on interweb noobs.

Try again, mr g.

Skidbladnir 6:53 pm 12 Oct 12

1) This is a shit idea, and a heavy-handed policy solution to something that is behavioural in nature.
2) In the non-essential classification, some devices are more essential than others. How does this scheme deal with such granularity?
3) How is this different from a circuitboard?
4) This isn’t a ‘saving’ as the media release suggests, its a cost avoidance. As per the media release logic, if we could all just tear out any electrical cabling, burn down the internet, and live out the 15th century all over again, we’d save billions on electricity expenditure.

AlexanderWatson 6:45 pm 12 Oct 12

Keijidosha said :

The premise of a single off switch sounds pretty logical if it was implemented so every electrical outlet had marked sockets – one for essential and another for non-essential supply. This type of solution would be far simpler and much cheaper than smart wiring a house.

Top idea… Kill the power to your standby consuming appliances and other non essential items when you hit the hay and if you need power once its off, say for a laptop or phone charge, you can plug into an essential socket. I like it.

Pirate_Biggles 5:39 pm 12 Oct 12

A single ‘off switch’ for non-essential electrical appliances raises some interesting points:
Some appliances are more non-essential than others – many modern devices maintain a clock even when powered down. I’m sure everyone has had the experience of coming home to find a short power outage has reset every clock on every device in the house.

Not to mention that unexpectedly dropping power to computers, storage and networking devices isn’t good for them. Particularly during backup operations.

Maybe more than one ‘off switch’ might be needed?
Say, one for kitchen power points (not the fridge or oven) one for bedroom power points, one for living room power points, one for hot water, one for the laundry etc.
Obviously you’d need to wire these as separate circuits.
These ‘off switches’ would then ‘break’ each designated circuit.
Then you could put in a panel to have them all on for easy access – maybe one with a cover so you don’t accidentally brush the important ones.
Like a wall mounted box or something.
Yep. That’s definitely a clever idea. You could call it a ‘circuit breaker box’.

I support this idea wholeheartedly.

Stuart Biggs
Pirate Party for Molonglo

RadioVK 5:37 pm 12 Oct 12

Keijidosha said :

The premise of a single off switch sounds pretty logical if it was implemented so every electrical outlet had marked sockets – one for essential and another for non-essential supply. This type of solution would be far simpler and much cheaper than smart wiring a house.

You could do it the way they do UPS systems. Red outlets for UPS power, and white ones for standard mains power. The only problem is you end up needing twice the hardware (power outlets, cabling, etc.) to do the same job.

Anyway, people will forget, and plug stuff into the wrong outlet, and the switch will end up with a piece of sticky tape over it to stop it getting switched off, because that will be easier than thinking about it.

Little_Green_Bag 5:26 pm 12 Oct 12

When I saw the head of this story I thought you were referring to Conroy’s Internet censorship plans.

Labor hasn’t dumped this policy, it’s just on hold and a little bird has told me that if Australians are stupid enough to re-elect Gillard next year it will be going through within weeks of the election.

Keijidosha 4:37 pm 12 Oct 12

The premise of a single off switch sounds pretty logical if it was implemented so every electrical outlet had marked sockets – one for essential and another for non-essential supply. This type of solution would be far simpler and much cheaper than smart wiring a house.

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