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Being a good samaritan in Canberra?

By Padoof 28 May 2011 34

My partner recently berated me for a good deed done, I thought I’d put it to fellow rioters to see what you think…

I was driving to Mitchell the other morning (8.30am) when I noticed the car ahead of me with a  deflated tyre, it was getting worse right before my eyes.  Whilst stopped at the lights on Gungahlin Drive (turning into Mitchell), I got out of my car and knocked on the fellow’s window – he just looked at me blankly.  Once I opened his door (yes indeedy I did!), and told him that his tyre was really bad, he did acknowledge that he had a slow leak.

What would other drivers have done?  My partner thinks that in this day and age you don’t know what type of person one could encounter, I lament that times are such that we don’t do good deeds.

My argument in support included consideration of the circumstances, obviously it’s not something I would have done on a deserted road at night time, I figured that in broad daylight with heavy traffic I would be fine.  I also didn’t fancy the idea of being stuck behind the idiot when his tyre went completely limp!

Over to you all, cheers!

What’s Your opinion?


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34 Responses to
Being a good samaritan in Canberra?
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Jivrashia 4:34 pm 30 May 11

I also didn’t fancy the idea of being stuck behind THE IDIOT when his tyre went completely limp!

Where we talking about a Good Samaritan or a girl with attitude?

BimboGeek 2:40 pm 30 May 11

Methamphetamine? You see someone with a flat tyre and that’s where your mind goes?

When I see someone having car trouble I always feel sorry for them and try to give them lots of space because I once got totally road raged because my car was misfiring. Yeah, thanks, I’m poor, my car sucks. Go ahead and get angry at ME for it! I’m trying to limp to the mechanic right now!

I wasn’t on drugs when it happened, I was on my way home from work. I would have been grateful for some help.

what_the 1:44 pm 30 May 11

any money he’s still driving around with a flat tyre

Padoof 1:39 pm 30 May 11

🙂 isn’t reflection a wonderful thing?

Perhaps the opening of the door was not my smartest ever idea, however his blank look and complete lack of any reaction led me to the door thing, the traffic was very heavy and I was conscious of being stuck out of my car with the lights about to change back to green. I guess I did what I thought I needed to do to get the message across, keeping in mind I’m a female, and it was a lone driver, my initial risk assessment was to go for it.

I am the kind of person who can be forthright, especially when considering how I’d feel if I didn’t and there was an incident (and thank you wildtukeycanoe, exactly how I think).

The fellow didn’t pull over, he kept on driving, I kept well back from him and wondered at how the idiot could in all conscience have kept on going, and am thankful that I didn’t bear witness to him crashing into something or someone.

amarooresident3 11:28 am 30 May 11

I-filed said :

Opening the car door when you had received a blank stare was incredibly risky behaviour. You were headed for Mitchell – where there is a sex trade and a lot of hard drugs – and you weren’t in a builtup area with other people right nearby. This guy could well have been on ICE – in which case, you were actually risking your life. Sorry, but hard drugs have changed the landscape for good samaritan acts. You should perhaps have pulled over and bipped, and hand signalled to him that there was a problem – but the onus should have been on him to get out of his car and ask you what his problem was.
I consider you are actually fortunate not to have met with a misadventure. Your partner was not being overprotective, but quite rational.

Yup, Mitchell is just like South Central LA at 8.30 in the morning. Can’t move for all the hard drugs and sex workers.

Mothy 11:15 am 30 May 11

Well done for letting them know, though I probably would have waited for a more opportune moment – i.e. the car park they’re going to, or a little more hesitantly, their destination driveway.

At the lights and opening their door – likely to invoke a defensive response – fight or flight.

MissChief 11:13 am 30 May 11

wildturkeycanoe said :

For those against the act of helping…

I don’t see any posts “against the act of helping”. If you read carefully, you’ll see people are just suggesting a balance between the lengths to which you should go to help someone and personal safety. In this instance an unnecessary amount of risk appears to have been taken.

Sleaz274 10:14 am 30 May 11

Looks like their are some ice addicted freaks on their monday come down typing at their keyboards…

Good work I say to the OP, we need more of it. It wasn’t until a motorcyclist tapped on my window one day and told me my brake lights were out that I even knew there was a problem.

People seem to feel incredibly unsafe outside their little boxes/cages/cubicles and I have no idea why.

Watson 7:22 am 30 May 11

I do agree that I wouldn’t have opened the car door, or got out of my car probably. Not because I live in constant fear of iceheads stabbing me, but because there are limits to how much effort I would go to to alert someone of a problem with their car.

Simmo 7:21 am 30 May 11

I-filed said :

Opening the car door when you had received a blank stare was incredibly risky behaviour. You were headed for Mitchell – where there is a sex trade and a lot of hard drugs – and you weren’t in a builtup area with other people right nearby. This guy could well have been on ICE – in which case, you were actually risking your life. Sorry, but hard drugs have changed the landscape for good samaritan acts. You should perhaps have pulled over and bipped, and hand signalled to him that there was a problem – but the onus should have been on him to get out of his car and ask you what his problem was.
I consider you are actually fortunate not to have met with a misadventure. Your partner was not being overprotective, but quite rational.

I hope you are being facetious, because I find your post amusing. “Incredibly risky behaviour” is not opening someone’s car door. Yes there are hard drugs out there but don’t be so alarmist to presume everyone is on them. “Fortunate not to have met with misadventure”- Perhaps you need to start living your life instead of worrying about all the things that could happen. It is a good world out there.

wildturkeycanoe 6:24 am 30 May 11

For those against the act of helping, due to the danger involved with “ice-addicted freaks and the such” I pose this question. If 2 minutes later that tyre was to cause the car to spin out and hit a family wagon head on doing 80km/h, resulting in multiple fatalities, would you curl up in a ball of guilt beacuse you could have prevented it from happening but were too gutless?
I once stopped at the scene of a smoldering wreck a few minutes to midnight, half hour from Broken Hill on a road I’d never traveled. Sure I thought twice about the danger of being attacked by the thieves that torched it and drove on into the night. Then I wondered if there was an innocent person/s slumped over the steering wheel gasping their last breaths and made a u-turn to check. It took a lot of guts to get out in the dark and look but I wouldn’t have a clear conscience today if I hadn’t made sure nobody was hurt [thankfully it was just a stolen joyride].
Personal safety before others’ welfare is understandable, but there are cases where certain individuals are allowed to put someone else before themselves. It’s what separates us from the animals.
In conclusion – Good on ya, I’d have done the same.

I-filed 9:46 pm 29 May 11

Opening the car door when you had received a blank stare was incredibly risky behaviour. You were headed for Mitchell – where there is a sex trade and a lot of hard drugs – and you weren’t in a builtup area with other people right nearby. This guy could well have been on ICE – in which case, you were actually risking your life. Sorry, but hard drugs have changed the landscape for good samaritan acts. You should perhaps have pulled over and bipped, and hand signalled to him that there was a problem – but the onus should have been on him to get out of his car and ask you what his problem was.
I consider you are actually fortunate not to have met with a misadventure. Your partner was not being overprotective, but quite rational.

MissChief 8:20 pm 29 May 11

I’m all for kindness in any form, however, I think you might have been asking for trouble opening his door.

I find winding down my passenger window and gesticulating normally gets the message though. If there isn’t an opportunity to do that, I would certainly calculate the need to put myself in such a vulnerable position.

If it isn’t life threatening, I think stay in your car. And as a general rule of thumb, don’t touch other people’s property. The benefactor of your kindness may well have reacted defensively.

Robertson 11:17 am 29 May 11

A Good Samaritan stopped for me once at about 2am out in the country near Ballarat somewhere when my car broke down. He helped me fix it and then I asked him where he was going and he wasn’t very clear about it (english not so good) but he didn’t have anywhere to go so I invited him home. He followed me the 2 hours it took to get home to Melbourne. It turned out he’d stolen the car he was in from his wife and was on the run from her family for some reason or other I couldn’t quite grasp. All he would eat was noodles. And he ate them squatting on the bonnet of his car in my driveway. He was a freak.

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