Skip to content Skip to main navigation

Community

Experts in Wills, Trusts
& Estate Planning

Charity Bins Becoming Rubbish Dumps

By fabforty 31 January 2010 34

This morning after a long overdue clean up of my spare room, I made a visit to the tip (or whatever it is now known as). I duly paid $10 to dump about three boxes of rubbish from the boot of my small car.

I then drove on to the Woolies carpark in Gungahlin to put a load of clothes into the Smith Family Bins and what I saw there absolutely appalled me. The area in front of these clothing bins, about five or six carspaces worth, was knee deep in garbage. None of this stuff could be of any possible use to charities. I am talking about broken plastic laundry baskets, stained mattresses, smashed tables and general household garbage.

I can only assume the people responsible for turning this area into their own rubbish tip have a good reason for it. Can they not afford tip fees ?

I would like to find out who is responsible for cleaning up this mess and hope it isn’t the charities. I think, financially, this would send them backwards rapidly.

I would also like to put it to my fellow RA associates if anyone has any ideas on how this illegal dumping can be stopped. Lowering tip fees might help. How about the Government put some large skips in designated places for people to dump stuff in ?

I don’t know. What does everyone else think ?

What’s Your opinion?


Please login to post your comments, or connect with
34 Responses to
Charity Bins Becoming Rubbish Dumps
Filter
Showing only Website comments
Order
Newest to Oldest
Oldest to Newst
RatsNest 1:28 pm 02 Feb 10

H1NG0 said :

If there were council pickups like in every other city in Australia, this would not be happening. Its is a disgrace that this is happening, but its about time ACT Government stopped ignoring the issue and did something about it.

Agree that its a disgrace that this is happening and i would love to see council pickups here in canberra, but i dont think the $X million dollars that the salvos spent last year on rubbish disposal can be put down to only places that dont have the council pickups. It might reduce the problem but won’t remove it.

spinact 12:25 pm 02 Feb 10

dvaey said :

One other interesting side note here, is that if someone does dump ‘illegally’ near a charity bin, no-one wants it.

The charities say they only take what is INSIDE the bin.
The government wont pay for cleanup of the area around the bin.
If a member of the public removes anything from outside a bin, they can be charged with theft.

Maybe what we need is some sort of government-supported business to collect this useful stuff and re-sell it like, say, revolve.

On the flip side, the last few times Ive been into a salvos or vinnies op-shop, Ive noticed the items for sale are often either very poor condition, or priced almost the same as new similar items. Many years ago, you used to be able to buy 10 items of clothing for 10 bucks, these days 5 items wont leave you much change out of a $50.

Many years ago you used to be able to buy a package of chips for 20 cents, now you don’t get much change out a $5 note…………

A friend of a friend told me about a story they saw on A Current Affair or Today Tonight about people ‘stealing’ from charity bins. Sure the stuff left at these bins is intended to go to charity but it raises an interesting legal question as to whether ‘stealing’ stuff outside of the bins is actually stealing. My guess is no it’s not

toriness 9:24 pm 01 Feb 10

100% agree with clown killer. i am so sick of people not taking responsibility for themselves. clean up your own bloody mess!!! anyone here blaming the ACT government should be not doing ‘something’ are (i am pretty damned sure) part of the set of guilty parties who dump their crap all over our nature strips and in our public spaces. get off your lazy asses and take your rubbish to the tip. it is not a collective responsibility for others to do it for you. have a freaking conscience for once. need someone to wipe your bum for you as well??

cleo 8:25 pm 01 Feb 10

I live in a block of govie flats, the rubbish that is dumped there is from other private flats, why don’t they take it to the dump, are they confused!!!!

Felix the Cat 8:22 pm 01 Feb 10

Gungahlin Al said :

Given it wasn’t just a Xmas/NY thing, and cretins it seems will continue being cretins, what I’m wondering is whether we should be asking the charities to remove the bins from the Gungahlin town centre?

They did remove the bins for a while a couple of years or so back, remember when they used to be up the top of the carpark? They should do it again, or at least empty them more often so people can put genuine donations into them.

Surely it can’t be cost effective for the charities to dump an estimated 75% of what it collects? How profitable is second hand clothing and old furniture these days? You can buy new cheap asian clothing and furniture from large department stores for very reasonable prices these days, it’s not like the stuff you buy from Vinnies is anything different.

housebound 6:22 pm 01 Feb 10

Okay, so there are enough lazy, selfish people in Canberra that there is a problem with dumping at charities, and so we taxpayers should have a clean-up service.

It really says something about the mentality of that section of the Canberra population.

H1NG0 3:11 pm 01 Feb 10

http://recyclingnearyou.com.au/clean-up/MelbourneVIC

Yes these people are inconsiderate Clown Killer, but if there was a clean up service maybe twice a year, it would remove a lot of this junk.

Clown Killer 2:33 pm 01 Feb 10

If there were council pickups like in every other city in Australia, this would not be happening. Its is a disgrace that this is happening, but its about time ACT Government stopped ignoring the issue and did something about it.

My parents live in melbourne. There are no council ‘pick ups’ where they live yet they don’t have people dumping crap all over the front of charity shops in their area. The reality is that this has nothing to do with the ACT Government and everything to do with mindless inconsiderate a-holes who think that someone will be really happy to recieve their old piss-stained mattress or collection of dog chewed kiddies toys.

If the governmnet should be doing anything at all it should be taking steps to catch and prosecute these people. Tipping fees in the ACT are ridiculously cheap (with the notable exception of the fee for dumping a CRT screen … but I digress), so it’s simply not possible to construct an argument around the cost of tipping. these people aren’t worried about the cost of tip fees, these people are just maggots who don’t know any better.

H1NG0 1:37 pm 01 Feb 10

If there were council pickups like in every other city in Australia, this would not be happening. Its is a disgrace that this is happening, but its about time ACT Government stopped ignoring the issue and did something about it.

prhhcd 1:26 pm 01 Feb 10

Agree with all your comments. Lets have the periodic hard waste pick up back – every other city does it!

Snarky 12:11 pm 01 Feb 10

dvaey@#21

normally we visit them after spring-cleaning, and have several bags of clothes and items to donate. The reason the charity bins are successful is because you can pull up next to them and dump the bags easily, without having to walk through a shopping centre. If you wanted to walk with the bags, you’d just go take it to the charity shop itself.

We generally collect stuff till we have 5-6 bags to drop off too. I don’t find it that big a deal to walk with them to drop off somewhere. Yes, I could go straight to the charity shop if it was open, and often I do. But on a Sunday afternoon our nearest one (Salvos, Cooleman Court) ain’t. The shopping centre is, though.

If these charity bins ARE removed, what do people think will happen to this dumped rubbish which is no use to charities? Do you think itll just magically disappear, or do you think itll get dumped somewhere else, say at playgrounds, carparks or elsewhere?

I doubt it’ll be dumped anywhere else more or less frequently than it is now. If people are going to dump it illegally anyway why do they go to the bother of going to find a charity bin to do it now? There are drains, parks and carparks everywhere a lot closer and a lot less effort to get to, but it doesn’t seem to happen that much (exceptions everywhere of course). I’m not convinced of your implied argument that the bins serve a useful purpose as an unofficial rubbish collection point now.

WRT the recycling argument, not sure that’s relevant – most of the crap that gets dumped isn’t recyclable – its just junk.

Mike Crowther 12:07 pm 01 Feb 10

There are a large number of people undergoing court ordered’ community service orders in the ACT. Many of them are directed to ‘work’ at charity these organisations.They can be seen on any Saturday morning sitting on the charity shops docks smoking and chatting for their three hours If the territory did a little supervising, then some of these people could be re-directed from their current practice of standing over the poor old girls who run these outlets, and used to actually clean up around the bins. IE: No more sitting on the dock socialising with each other for three hours each Saturday morning as an alternative to a goal sentence.

Of course this would involve the Govt taking some interest in the results of their policies so personally, I wouldn’t be holding my breath Fabforty

niftydog 11:51 am 01 Feb 10

I saw the Salvo’s on the TV a few weeks back – $7 million last year spent on clean up at the collection bins AND at the shop fronts. They also said that if they remove charity bins from a shopping centre, the nearest shop front cops an influx.

It’s not that people can’t afford the fees, it’s just that being a lazy, ignorant, selfish asshole is all the rage these days. I saw some idiot dump a washing machine in a culvert near Lyneham a few months back. He should have realised that you can dump stuff like that for free at Mitchell as it has scrap value. Heck, some scrap merchants will even come and collect!

The resource centres are run by contractors; You can’t exactly make them lower or abolish their fees!

A hard rubbish day would be awesome, but I’d be worried that people would spend six months stacking junk up on their nature strip waiting for the next collection.

Smaller stuff goes nicely in the regular rubbish bin – I often have a little pile of junk in the garage, and every bin day it gets a little bit smaller.

dvaey 11:13 am 01 Feb 10

Snarky said :

bd84 @#14 beat me to it, but I think the idea of putting charity bins inside a shopping centre would pretty much eliminate the problem entirely. They’d need to be better presented of course, but I reckon that they’d actually be even more convenient to use for most people

Maybe youve never dumped stuff in a vinnies bin, but you dont just throw in a shirt or a pair of shorts, normally we visit them after spring-cleaning, and have several bags of clothes and items to donate. The reason the charity bins are successful is because you can pull up next to them and dump the bags easily, without having to walk through a shopping centre. If you wanted to walk with the bags, you’d just go take it to the charity shop itself.

If these charity bins ARE removed, what do people think will happen to this dumped rubbish which is no use to charities? Do you think itll just magically disappear, or do you think itll get dumped somewhere else, say at playgrounds, carparks or elsewhere?

This falls into the same thing as recycled material for us. We often collect way more recycable material than rubbish, however as our recycling bin fills faster than rubbish, our rubbish bin is often over 50% full of plastic bottles or cans. Sure, I could spend the $5 in fuel to take it to the recycling depot, or I could save my money at the expense of the environment and throw it all in the garbage bin.

Related Articles

CBR Tweets

Sign up to our newsletter

Top
Copyright © 2018 Riot ACT Holdings Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.
the-riotact.com | aboutregional.com.au | b2bmagazine.com.au | thisiscanberra.com

Search across the site