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Feral peacocks to be purged from Narrabundah

By johnboy - 15 April 2013 32

peacock

TAMS have the sad news that they’re taking action against the burgeoning peacock population in the Inner South:

To help address a growing number of complaints from residents, as well as protect surrounding parkland, a program will be undertaken to relocate up to 20 peacocks that are located in Narrabundah, Territory and Municipal Services announced today.

There is an estimated 30 feral peacocks that roost in Narrabundah and arrangements have been made with Taronga Zoo to take up to 20 of them. It is thought the peacocks originated from a wildlife park in Symonston which closed in the 1980s.

“In recent times there has been a growing number of complaints from the residents of St Aidan’s Court, as well as in the broader Narrabundah area, about the problems the peacocks are causing.

These problems include noise and droppings as well as damage to buildings, gardens and parkland,” said Fleur Flanery, Director, City Services.

“The peacocks have also been reported as posing potential traffic hazards. Peacocks are a feral introduced species so we do need to look at how we manage their growing population.

One wonders what other remnants of the Ghost Zoo are still running free?

[Photo by Madison Berndt CC BY 2.0]

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32 Responses to
Feral peacocks to be purged from Narrabundah
sarahblaec 4:05 pm 15 Apr 13

The TAMS media release says ““It is not possible to relocate them in the Canberra region as this may simply transfer the problem more broadly across the ACT” although they may not have considered establishing the group as a new captive population – I guess it can’t hurt to ask.

On the plus side though, while they’ve not indicated what they intend to do with the remaining 10-or-so birds, the 20 they’re trapping are heading off to a new home at Taronga Zoo which is a really good outcome.

dungfungus 3:50 pm 15 Apr 13

johnboy said :

You can be sure TAMS will be reading. But an email to Shane Rattenbury should do it!

I was going to suggest an email to John Mackay but…………………….

johnboy 3:49 pm 15 Apr 13

You can be sure TAMS will be reading. But an email to Shane Rattenbury should do it!

dungfungus 3:47 pm 15 Apr 13

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd said :

I have never even heard of this. Amazing. There are photos of me as a young child in the 80s at the old zoo next to these birds or offspring(not sure how they age) but I remember absolutely loving the peacocks as a child.

And what a great idea about moving them to the arbotirium. Is there any way to suggest this to tams?

You could try and phone the person who made the press release (go to link on RA article).
Also, do a Google images of “peacocks at Cataract Gorge”.

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd 3:39 pm 15 Apr 13

I have never even heard of this. Amazing. There are photos of me as a young child in the 80s at the old zoo next to these birds or offspring(not sure how they age) but I remember absolutely loving the peacocks as a child.

And what a great idea about moving them to the arbotirium. Is there any way to suggest this to tams?

zorro29 3:29 pm 15 Apr 13

well there ya go…thanks #4 and #5….they never come to barton!

dungfungus 3:29 pm 15 Apr 13

Seriously, why not relocate them to the arboretum?
Anyone who has visited The Gorge in Launceston would recall the free roaming peacocks in the mature gardens there. Kids are usually facsinated by them. They wouldn’t look out of place with all the exotic trees there.

Pestiness 3:25 pm 15 Apr 13

While it’s ‘sad’ that these animals are being appropriately controlled (as it’s not the animals’ fault they have been introduced into an ecosystem-modified or otherwise-that is unsuitable), what would be far ‘sadder’ is if they continued to grow in unsustainable populations and consequently starved, got involved in traffic incidents, got menaced by urban dogs, and some of the other horrid plights that would likely result from lack of control and burgeoning numbers. TAMS is taking a sensible approach. What would you expect them to do? Traumatise the things by translocating them?

bundah 3:07 pm 15 Apr 13

Blen_Carmichael said :

Narrabundah? I thought Jon Stanhope was on Christmas Island.

When i think of Stanhope there’s not a pea to be seen anywhere unless of course one is referring to the grey matter.

Blen_Carmichael 2:55 pm 15 Apr 13

Narrabundah? I thought Jon Stanhope was on Christmas Island.

sarahblaec 2:46 pm 15 Apr 13

zorro29 said :

we have wild peacocks in the inner south? i have never seen one…

Yep, peacocks in the inner south, and a lengthy list of other feral species Australia-wide. There are a lot of unexpectedly exotic animals that have established populations in Australia too, as escapees from zoos/circuses etc (like the peacocks), through accidental transfer in cargo (like the Pacific house gecko), or the escape/release of animals originally kept as pets (eg ferrets, red-eared slider turtles). It’s pretty scary.

bundah 2:39 pm 15 Apr 13

zorro29 said :

we have wild peacocks in the inner south? i have never seen one…

They tend to congregate at the top of Carnegie/Brockman/Wylie.

zorro29 2:30 pm 15 Apr 13

we have wild peacocks in the inner south? i have never seen one…

johnboy 2:10 pm 15 Apr 13
sarahblaec 2:09 pm 15 Apr 13

I support the efforts to remove these birds from Narrabundah (as beautiful as they are, they don’t belong there), but if I read the TAMS announcement correctly, they estimate that there are around 30 birds, but they’re only going to relocate “up to” 20 to Taronga Zoo. What happens to the remainder? Are they just hoping that the population will be driven below sustainable levels or are there likely to be further efforts to trap the rest of the birds in the near future?

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