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Mark Parton doesn’t get why people like drugs

By johnboy - 9 June 2010 216

An intriguing post by 2CC’s Mark Parton on his blog today.

It seems either policing has become massively more effective or you’re all hoovering up more drugs, particularly charlie (cocaine).

Across the country our most dominant illicit drug is cannabis, but there has been, according to these stats from the Australian Crime Commission, an increase in the use of cocaine.

Can you think of anything worse than snorting this powder up your nose ? Makes my skin crawl. I still don’t really understand I do wonder how some otherwise intelligent individuals ever find themselves hooked on these substances. What would possess you to inject a substance with a reputation as bad as heroin into your blood stream ?

Well, either drug users (not necessarily addicts) are really dumb, or maybe reputations are misleading?

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216 Responses to
Mark Parton doesn’t get why people like drugs
AngryHenry 3:30 pm 09 Jun 10

Don’t knock it until you try it!

Or if you want to play it safe read some Hunter S Thompson or listen to some Bill Hicks.

ConanOfCooma 3:22 pm 09 Jun 10

The facts are available, it’s just that the people in power choose to ignore them. The majority of illicit drugs are no where near as dangerous as either ciggarettes or alcohol, and yet the users are demonised.

I find it much more socially acceptable to see a couple of guys tripping balls looking for treasure in a park than it to encounter any kind of drunk. But then you get the speed freaks scratching at their faces out the back of Civic, begging for smokes and silver coins.

I reckon legalise it all, but strictly controlled, such as the Netherlands. But without the stupid tourists from the US.

CanberraCreative 3:20 pm 09 Jun 10

KidKenosha said :

I think you’d be surprised. Most drug users (hard and soft) I know are fully aware of the risks of dependence and overuse. (Most, but definitely not all.) They still take them because they enjoy them, and they manage to hold down respectable jobs and be generally well-rounded people.

The point is that we’ve grown up being bombarded by anti-drug propaganda, to the point that we find it deeply suspicious. We’re told that illegal drugs are illegal because they’re harmful; however, I’ve yet to see any conclusive evidence suggesting that occasional use of cocaine or amphetamines is any worse for the body than occasional drinking and smoking. We look back to the 60s and 70s and laugh at the over-the-top “reefer madness” propaganda, but it makes us think: who gains from criminalising these things, and what incentive do they really have to tell the truth?

I would suggest you’re being very selective in what evidence you’re choosing to be cognisant of. Need I remind you that many amphetamines are cut with other chemicals which will cause immediate harm even in a single dose.. rat poison for example.

Perhaps if we follow your logic, then the safe sex message is also just propaganda, designed to benefit the manufacturers of prophylactics.
After all, if you only do it occasionally, the chances are you won’t catch anything… right?

Holden Caulfield 2:38 pm 09 Jun 10

I think we need drug cameras on the roads. That’s the only way to cut down the drug toll.

BimboGeek 2:25 pm 09 Jun 10

Hells_Bells74 said :

To my observations, half the adult (or pretending to be) population under 50 seem to like drugs of some sort.

Since it’s not really discussed, it’s hard to really know who is taking drugs, you just have your peer group to go from. Problem is that you’re hanging out with the drug taking crowd. Statistics say only a few percent of us are taking drugs.

I’d suggest broadening your social group a bit. Chances are high that no matter how hard you think the party is going, there’s someone totally straight-edge in the room and plenty of people who take drugs occasionally but aren’t on anything at the time.

Not that you shouldn’t take drugs, go ahead if that’s what you want, but I think it’s good to have an accurate perspective.

p1 2:06 pm 09 Jun 10

KidKenosha said :

We look back to the 60s and 70s and laugh at the over-the-top “reefer madness” propaganda…

Some of it is pretty damn funny, others scary.

Hells_Bells74 1:59 pm 09 Jun 10

The War on Drugs keeps the drugs focused on.. Which is great for sales!

Pommy bastard 1:53 pm 09 Jun 10

Well, either drug users (not necessarily addicts) are really dumb, or maybe reputations are misleading?

Or maybe Mark Patton is playing dumb, as in; drugs = cocaine & heroin folks, highly lethal, incredibly addictive, “one taste and you’re dead junkie in the gutter” claptrap, to get his audience onside.

This is interesting; http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/41949000/gif/_41949092_drugs_graph_416.gif

ex-vectis 1:53 pm 09 Jun 10

Many years ago (more than I like to remember! :-)), when living in the UK, I used to go to Amsterdam every few months.

Not for the red-light district (honest!) but for the weed (aka, Cannabis, Marijuana etc). I didnt go to get ‘wasted’ but because I enjoyed trying the different types and the subtle differences in flavour and effect. I’d like to think I became quite a connoisseur; in the same way as someone might say they are a connoisseur of fine wines/spirits.

I’d even take fellow poms with me who had never tried weed but who felt safe that I’d not take them into some drugged nightmare haze they would never wake from. Most of them enjoyed it and some didn’t – like everything! But they were all grateful to me for ‘educating’ them as the only real information they had was the mis-information pumped out by successive Governments and anti-drugs campaigners. One of the campaigns that always made me laugh was the one that said “Smoking dope leads to harder drugs” – well, yes it does because it is illegal and so the person selling it to you will probably be quite willing to sell you the harder stuff as well.

Even the Poll at the top of this thread does nothing to help people make an informed decision. The choices are “Their users must be really dumb” or “Might be more fun and less harmful than some say”!! What sort of choices are they? Where is the choice of “All drugs, including Tobacco and Alcohol, are harmful but taken sensibly and in moderation the risks can be reduced and be fun” (although don’t know about tobacco there, never understood why people smoke tobacco! :-)).

I read in the paper recently the account about the young girl who had become addicted to smoking Cannabis. But then I saw that she had started when she was 14! Why is it that the media screams about that (that itself is an anomally as well. Cannabis is not physically adictive but can be very habit forming and therfore form a psychological dependance – I know of many folk who wake up in the morning and ‘cant function’ until they have had a cone. In the same way as I know people who cant function until they have had a coffee in the morning!!) but there is very rarely any mention of the kids who become physically addicted to alcohol? Where were this girl’s parents? How could it be that the girl had come into contact with Cannabis at the age of 14 (or even younger!)?

The underlying reason for this mess is that it is illegal, a taboo subject and as such there is little informed debate. Well meaning folk, but with little or no knowledge on the subject, jump up and down with the hysterical “Just say no!!! Dont touch it!! One smoke and you’re hooked and will die!!”. With that approach no wonder our kids want to see what the fuss is about, its called human nature. If Cannabis was legal, but reglated along with Alcohol & Tobacco and with punitive taxes, then it is widely agreed that much our drugs problems – along with drug related crime! – would reduce. The downside would be that stoners would be more visible with the increased danger of people being bored to death if accidently getting into conversation with one (just try having a conversation with a stoned person; they dont make the most interesting people to talk to! :-)).

Just like alcohol, if you smoke (or even eat! I’ve had some wicked hash-cakes in Amsterdam!!) to excess every day then it WILL be detrimental to your life and health and eventually be the prime cause of everything that comes crashing down around you. Is’t it sad that due to our laws there is a safety net for those who develop a problem with alcohol (and that safety net can be the persons social circle as well as charity and governmental) but not with drugs?

Ok, i’ll stop there as this is in danger of becoming RA’s longest ditribe of drivel for a long time chuckle.

jimbocool 1:40 pm 09 Jun 10

Well if snorting cocaine is the problem, Mark, you can always avail yourself of a snowcone. I would also point out that heroin, of itself, is not harmful – indeed it is used in UK hospitals as standard analgesia. It is the things associated with the criminalisation of heroin that is harmful: impurity, dirty needles, cost, social stigma etc.

KidKenosha 1:23 pm 09 Jun 10

CanberraCreative wrote:

> There a lot of things I don’t understand, my generation’s approach to drugs is one of them.
> That there is a risk to using them seems a foreign concept. That people use and abuse it is
> accepted in such a matter of fact way, spoken of as one would normally speak of coffee or
> beer. Most of those who use are not addicts, rather, they seek an escape.

I think you’d be surprised. Most drug users (hard and soft) I know are fully aware of the risks of dependence and overuse. (Most, but definitely not all.) They still take them because they enjoy them, and they manage to hold down respectable jobs and be generally well-rounded people.

The point is that we’ve grown up being bombarded by anti-drug propaganda, to the point that we find it deeply suspicious. We’re told that illegal drugs are illegal because they’re harmful; however, I’ve yet to see any conclusive evidence suggesting that occasional use of cocaine or amphetamines is any worse for the body than occasional drinking and smoking. We look back to the 60s and 70s and laugh at the over-the-top “reefer madness” propaganda, but it makes us think: who gains from criminalising these things, and what incentive do they really have to tell the truth?

Hells_Bells74 1:22 pm 09 Jun 10

It’s been a long, long time since I’ve been to a night out or party without drugs being done somewhere. Unless, the hosts are say 50 or older or anything to do with kids.

To my observations, half the adult (or pretending to be) population under 50 seem to like drugs of some sort.

If you factored legal ones in, you would come close to saturation surely.

It really will shock Canberra to have drug driving tests thrown at them. It’s a huge thing, but like with drinking, designated drivers won’t be able to pop that midnight ‘e’ to keep going, or take speed to get to work the next day/night.

Or worse still, if you are addicted, you will come to crossroads now. We will soon see how much people like drugs alright (through the courts that is), Mr Parton.

p1 1:00 pm 09 Jun 10

Drugs may well be exactly as harmful as they say, but by all accounts they are lots of fun too. While there might be a small percentage of people out there who only consume alcoholic beverages because they like the taste, the majority do it because they like the effect it has on their mental state (subtle as that may be for a “responsible drinker).

So if you have one light beer shandy, or a line of coke, it’s for the same reason.

Swaggie 12:50 pm 09 Jun 10

“Responsibility” CC

CanberraCreative 12:44 pm 09 Jun 10

There a lot of things I don’t understand, my generation’s approach to drugs is one of them. That there is a risk to using them seems a foreign concept. That people use and abuse it is accepted in such a matter of fact way, spoken of as one would normally speak of coffee or beer. Most of those who use are not addicts, rather, they seek an escape.

While we’re asking about drugs, let’s ask why people (and in particular younger people) are abusing alcohol so much. Let’s ask why any free night has become an excuse not just to drink and have a good time, but to “get wasted” as so many girls put it. It’s the same reason, they seek an escape. An escape from what is the question?

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