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23-26 Aug 2018

Oxygen thief or future Canberra Art Prize winner?

By Pork Hunt 16 July 2012 56

roadkill art

Saw this at the ANU. I hope the tax payer is not footing the bill for this degree…

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56 Responses to
Oxygen thief or future Canberra Art Prize winner?
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boz 7:31 pm 03 Aug 12

c_c said :

a stain on higher education.

A very expensive stain

c_c 1:24 pm 03 Aug 12

laomedia said :

This is a process shared by human and non-human animals reminding us of our mortality and animality. Rotting flesh is repulsive to our sensory organs and taboo in our hypoallergenic society.

This kind of nonsensical writing is a stain on higher education.

johnboy 11:00 am 03 Aug 12

laomedia said :

This is a process shared by human and non-human animals reminding us of our mortality and animality.

Or you could have said:

This is a process shared by all animals reminding us of our mortality and animality.

Not picking sides, just a pet peeve of which many in this town are guilty.

laomedia 10:57 am 03 Aug 12

Another statement by the artist:

The decomposition print or shroud is a bodily stain that captures the rapid breaking down of the body after death. This is a process shared by human and non-human animals reminding us of our mortality and animality. Rotting flesh is repulsive to our sensory organs and taboo in our hypoallergenic society. The notion of the abject or abhorrent in art challenges our distinction between object and subject. An object is perceived as a thing used for a purpose, a subject is one who has agency and rights we can identify with. The representation of animals is a contentious issue at a time when the modern perception of animal as object is being challenged. In my work I experience the assimilation of the abject. The rancid object, a dead body, becomes a subject as I capture the essence of individual disintegrating forms and present them in a painting format to be venerated.
To view the results of this stage of my exploration go to my blog post:
http://laomedia.com/blog/?m=201203

intaba 11:12 am 01 Aug 12

Masquara said :

rosscoact said :

…assuming the tycoons pay [their taxes]….

While on the topic of Art & funding, allow me to digress for a moment and draw attention to the Greens’ incredible hypocrisy on art & taxes … Richard Walsh, the owner of the new art museum in Tasmania, didn’t pay any tax on his business dealings – taking gambling profits from the pockets of gambling addicts, no less – which is why he had the readies to invest hundreds of millions in MONA. Now that the ATO would like to tax him (retrospectively, because he fibbed about his business dealings), none other than Saint Bob Brown, Anti-Pokies and pro Mining Tax,has suddenly decided that it’s fine for this particularly billionaire to pay no tax. I’d love to know the ACT Greens’ opinion of thatty!

Actually it’s David Walsh, and he doesn’t take money from gambling addicts, he wins money from the people who take money from gambling addicts. The profits he didn’t pay tax on were then used to give Tasmania an internationally recognised gallery, one of its biggest tourist attractions and a drawcard for people to go to Tasmania and spend their money, many of whom wouldn’t have heard of Tasmania before the existence of MONA.
From The Australian, 6 July 2012 (http://www.theaustralian.com.au/national-affairs/treasury/mona-in-precarious-spot-as-tax-office-chases-gambler-david-walshs-millions/story-fn59nsif-1226418380383)
“The ATO alleges the international gambling syndicate of which Mr Walsh is one of 19 members runs a $2.4 billion business, based on the use of complicated computer software to analyse mostly racing data to aid successful punting.”

VYBerlinaV8_is_back 10:00 am 01 Aug 12

HenryBG said :

urchin said :

everyone so quick to criticise what they don’t understand…
.

It’s not crap for the reason I don’t understand it. It’s crap because Art for the last several decades has lacked originality, lacked beauty, and usually has also been entirely lacking in technical skill. (Modern music is slightly different – highly technical, but dissonant gibberish). Modern Art’s only defence of its descent into crapness is a ridiculous feigned elitism which, although it does have some fooled, doesn’t fool me.
I *do* understand it – crap produced by a bunch of under-educated scammers who can’t produce anything of beauty.

Well said. Art needs to make me think, to move me somehow. Much of the crap I see these days does nothing of the sort. But then occasionally I see a piece (usually a sculpture or painting) where I could just look at it for hours.

Letting animals decompose is not art.

HenryBG 9:50 am 01 Aug 12

urchin said :

everyone so quick to criticise what they don’t understand…
.

It’s not crap for the reason I don’t understand it. It’s crap because Art for the last several decades has lacked originality, lacked beauty, and usually has also been entirely lacking in technical skill. (Modern music is slightly different – highly technical, but dissonant gibberish). Modern Art’s only defence of its descent into crapness is a ridiculous feigned elitism which, although it does have some fooled, doesn’t fool me.
I *do* understand it – crap produced by a bunch of under-educated scammers who can’t produce anything of beauty.

urchin 11:53 pm 31 Jul 12

HenryBG said :

laomedia said :

Whether any of you like it or not, the university is supporting my research, and my experiments with the collection of bodily pigment is not the only research I am doing toward a PhD.
The installation is the beginning of a process and not the final work, I do not kill animals in order to produce work and national parks do not consider what I do (relocating roadkill) to be a threat to animal populations.
In fact in one instant a ranger helped me place the body of a female kangaroo on canvas.
Think about it next time you drive a car.
Leaving a body on the road to be run over multiple times and mashed into the bitumen does not seem dignified to me.
What I am doing requires care and consideration.
I love animals and consider myself a human animal.
Animals have always been the subject of my art.

So, when you get your PhD, you’ll be able to paint like Turner could when he was 18 and living in London doing tourist watercolours during his apprenticeship?
Do you have *any* plans on developing some technical skill?
How about some literacy skills? Most artists in the past were fairly good writers as well.

everyone so quick to criticise what they don’t understand… and good ole’ henry, i’m sure, did a detailed survey of this person’s entire portfolio before accusing him of lacking technical skills. no doubt henry would be a fantastic judge of what constitutes “technical skill”… given his sensitive demeanour he no doubt has a delicate, artistic temperament. taste is subjective, deal with it.

and loving all the grammar policing. it’s a universal law of the internetosphere that that anyone who criticises someone on language will invariably make a mistake of similar or greater magnitude shortly thereafter…

c_c 10:36 pm 31 Jul 12

laomedia said :

Whether any of you like it or not, the university is supporting my research, and my experiments with the collection of bodily pigment is not the only research I am doing toward a PhD.
The installation is the beginning of a process and not the final work, I do not kill animals in order to produce work and national parks do not consider what I do (relocating roadkill) to be a threat to animal populations.
In fact in one instant a ranger helped me place the body of a female kangaroo on canvas.
Think about it next time you drive a car.
Leaving a body on the road to be run over multiple times and mashed into the bitumen does not seem dignified to me.
What I am doing requires care and consideration.
I love animals and consider myself a human animal.
Animals have always been the subject of my art.

Moving away from the always contentious question of whether something is art, it’s the PHD I’m more interested in. How does your smearing decomposing remains on canvas further human understanding and knowledge in an important way?

Masquara 9:29 pm 31 Jul 12

rosscoact said :

…assuming the tycoons pay [their taxes]….

While on the topic of Art & funding, allow me to digress for a moment and draw attention to the Greens’ incredible hypocrisy on art & taxes … Richard Walsh, the owner of the new art museum in Tasmania, didn’t pay any tax on his business dealings – taking gambling profits from the pockets of gambling addicts, no less – which is why he had the readies to invest hundreds of millions in MONA. Now that the ATO would like to tax him (retrospectively, because he fibbed about his business dealings), none other than Saint Bob Brown, Anti-Pokies and pro Mining Tax,has suddenly decided that it’s fine for this particularly billionaire to pay no tax. I’d love to know the ACT Greens’ opinion of thatty!

HenryBG 8:11 pm 31 Jul 12

laomedia said :

Whether any of you like it or not, the university is supporting my research, and my experiments with the collection of bodily pigment is not the only research I am doing toward a PhD.
The installation is the beginning of a process and not the final work, I do not kill animals in order to produce work and national parks do not consider what I do (relocating roadkill) to be a threat to animal populations.
In fact in one instant a ranger helped me place the body of a female kangaroo on canvas.
Think about it next time you drive a car.
Leaving a body on the road to be run over multiple times and mashed into the bitumen does not seem dignified to me.
What I am doing requires care and consideration.
I love animals and consider myself a human animal.
Animals have always been the subject of my art.

So, when you get your PhD, you’ll be able to paint like Turner could when he was 18 and living in London doing tourist watercolours during his apprenticeship?
Do you have *any* plans on developing some technical skill?
How about some literacy skills? Most artists in the past were fairly good writers as well.

Mr Evil 8:08 pm 31 Jul 12

laomedia said :

Whether any of you like it or not, the university is supporting my research, and my experiments with the collection of bodily pigment is not the only research I am doing toward a PhD.
The installation is the beginning of a process and not the final work, I do not kill animals in order to produce work and national parks do not consider what I do (relocating roadkill) to be a threat to animal populations.
In fact in one instant a ranger helped me place the body of a female kangaroo on canvas.
Think about it next time you drive a car.
Leaving a body on the road to be run over multiple times and mashed into the bitumen does not seem dignified to me.
What I am doing requires care and consideration.
I love animals and consider myself a human animal.
Animals have always been the subject of my art.

That’s really great, but the last person to use dead animals in their art at the SoA managed to alienate themselves from nearly everyone in their workshop AND also had a run in with the Police and news media.

Just ask the Head of Photomedia if he remembers those ‘glory’ days of the mid-90s, and I’m sure he’ll fill you in on all the details……

milkman 7:12 pm 31 Jul 12

laomedia said :

Whether any of you like it or not, the university is supporting my research, and my experiments with the collection of bodily pigment is not the only research I am doing toward a PhD.
The installation is the beginning of a process and not the final work, I do not kill animals in order to produce work and national parks do not consider what I do (relocating roadkill) to be a threat to animal populations.
In fact in one instant a ranger helped me place the body of a female kangaroo on canvas.
Think about it next time you drive a car.
Leaving a body on the road to be run over multiple times and mashed into the bitumen does not seem dignified to me.
What I am doing requires care and consideration.
I love animals and consider myself a human animal.
Animals have always been the subject of my art.

Thanks for the good news.

Antagonist 5:29 pm 31 Jul 12

laomedia said :

The installation is the beginning of a process and not the final work, I do not kill animals in order to produce work and national parks do not consider what I do (relocating roadkill) to be a threat to animal populations.

While relocating roadkill is no threat to animal populations, collecting or interfering with native animals (dead or alive) is still illegal under ACT law, NSW law and the international CITES convention.

In fact in one instant a ranger helped me place the body of a female kangaroo on canvas.
Think about it next time you drive a car.

1. ‘Instance’ – not ‘instant’.
2. So you had a Ranger assist you in breaking the law? The Ranger should know better, you should know better, and those people supervising your PhD should also know better. PhD or not, you are breaking the law when you collect native fauna for your ‘art’.

laomedia 3:27 pm 31 Jul 12

Whether any of you like it or not, the university is supporting my research, and my experiments with the collection of bodily pigment is not the only research I am doing toward a PhD.
The installation is the beginning of a process and not the final work, I do not kill animals in order to produce work and national parks do not consider what I do (relocating roadkill) to be a threat to animal populations.
In fact in one instant a ranger helped me place the body of a female kangaroo on canvas.
Think about it next time you drive a car.
Leaving a body on the road to be run over multiple times and mashed into the bitumen does not seem dignified to me.
What I am doing requires care and consideration.
I love animals and consider myself a human animal.
Animals have always been the subject of my art.

Jindy 1:19 pm 18 Jul 12

Spiral said :

threepaws said :

When I saw that, I thought to myself “there should be some kind of a law against that” – and what do you know – there is.

No there isn’t. Artists are above the law.

That seemed to be the idea that most artists and much of the population had about that artist who was using under age nude models a few years ago (in Melbourne iirc)

Artists are not above the law.

Just a couple of years ago some enterprising guys thought of a similar thing to this, they would find a roadkill and shovel it onto a tshirt placed on the side of the road and spray the shirt with paint. After drying and washing the tshirt would be sold with the silhouette of roadkill on it. The gov had them shut down under pain of prosecution for breaking the law already quoted in this thread.

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