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Research program to examine Mr Fluffy health risks

By Canfan - 16 February 2015 5

ACT Chief Minister Andrew Barr and Minister for Health Simon Corbell today announced a research program into the potential long-term health risks of living in a house with loose-fill “Mr Fluffy” asbestos.

The research will be undertaken by the Australian National University’s National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health and overseen by the Chief Health Officer.

Chief Minister Andrew Barr said the ACT Government would be investigating the potential health impacts that this type of asbestos may have on residents who have are living or have lived in these homes.

“Mr Fluffy loose-fill asbestos has been identified in more than a thousand Canberra homes and this grant demonstrates our ongoing commitment to addressing the legacy of Mr Fluffy,” he said.

“Mr Fluffy homeowners indicated to the ACT Government at an Asbestos Response Taskforce community forum last year that they would like a health study conducted on this issue. We have listened, and responded.

“We have commissioned an epidemiological study on the risk of developing mesothelioma among people who have lived, or are currently living, in a house with loose-fill asbestos in the ACT.”

Minister for Health Simon Corbell said that although the mesothelioma rate was low in the ACT, with around 10 cases per year, the ACT faced a unique problem in the large number of loose-fill asbestos houses in the territory, and it was important for the government to find out as much as it could about the effects of living in a Mr Fluffy house.

“The period from exposure to developing mesothelioma can be as long as 40 years so if there is an increase in mesothelioma cases in the ACT as a result of loose-fill amosite asbestos, it may not be seen for many years,” he said.

“This means that it is possible that this study may well be updated over time.

“ACT Health already has a robust surveillance and knowledge system of loose-fill amosite asbestos and mesothelioma affected persons who lived in the ACT at the time of diagnosis.

“Each part of the study will feed information into the next part so the whole picture will not become clear until the end of the study.

“General results of the study will be made public and it is anticipated that detailed results will be published in peer-reviewed journals.”

What’s Your opinion?


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5 Responses to
Research program to examine Mr Fluffy health risks
1
nothappyjan 1:00 am
18 Feb 15
#

Is it horse before cart or buyback before study?

2
gazket 1:11 pm
18 Feb 15
#

Didn’t Andrew Barr just last week say the ACT government won’t pay over the odds for anything.
i.e. for the mowing of our public grass areas and foreclosed on local contracts and jobs for a Melbourne council bid to mow our grass.

This study is costing $415,000 which seems well over the odds for a study that will gives us answers we already know.

Mesothelioma is an aggressive cancer affecting the membrane lining of the lungs and abdomen. Malignant mesothelioma is the most serious of all asbestos-related diseases. Exposure to asbestos is the primary cause and risk factor for mesothelioma.

3
rommeldog56 4:26 pm
18 Feb 15
#

A while back, I heard the ex Chief Minister on Mark Parton’s 1206 radio show admitting that the ACT Gov’t knew about this fluffy issue 9+ years ago – but did nothing about it then.

In the last few days, I also heard someone from the ANUs research team saying that the risk to occupants in those affected houese is very low and that there had been no noticeable trending up of instances of mesothelioma in the ACT – but unfortunately, I suppose that could yet be seen.

Will this study also include tradies who have worked on those affected properties (if they can be traced) ?

If the risk to occupants is very low as claimed, then why do the study ? What will it achieve ? If there is a trending up – then will the ACT Gov’t be held accountable for its admitted apparent inaction 9+ years ago ?

Perhaps this study is the ACT Gov’t getting an attack of the “guilts” ?

4
dungfungus 5:20 pm
18 Feb 15
#

rommeldog56 said :

A while back, I heard the ex Chief Minister on Mark Parton’s 1206 radio show admitting that the ACT Gov’t knew about this fluffy issue 9+ years ago – but did nothing about it then.

In the last few days, I also heard someone from the ANUs research team saying that the risk to occupants in those affected houese is very low and that there had been no noticeable trending up of instances of mesothelioma in the ACT – but unfortunately, I suppose that could yet be seen.

Will this study also include tradies who have worked on those affected properties (if they can be traced) ?

If the risk to occupants is very low as claimed, then why do the study ?

What will it achieve ?

If there is a trending up – then will the ACT Gov’t be held accountable for its admitted apparent inaction 9+ years ago ?

Perhaps this study is the ACT Gov’t getting an attack of the “guilts” ?

“What will it achieve ? ”
Well, local universities have a penchant for sponsoring sporting teams that are dear to some in the government.

5
chewy14 9:57 pm
18 Feb 15
#

rommeldog56 said :

A while back, I heard the ex Chief Minister on Mark Parton’s 1206 radio show admitting that the ACT Gov’t knew about this fluffy issue 9+ years ago – but did nothing about it then.

In the last few days, I also heard someone from the ANUs research team saying that the risk to occupants in those affected houese is very low and that there had been no noticeable trending up of instances of mesothelioma in the ACT – but unfortunately, I suppose that could yet be seen.

Will this study also include tradies who have worked on those affected properties (if they can be traced) ?

If the risk to occupants is very low as claimed, then why do the study ?

What will it achieve ?

If there is a trending up – then will the ACT Gov’t be held accountable for its admitted apparent inaction 9+ years ago ?

Perhaps this study is the ACT Gov’t getting an attack of the “guilts” ?

They think the risk is low due to the fact that there hasn’t been a large spike in disease. The study is clearly designed to quantify the risk and the likely effect we might see in the future from people who’ve been living in these residences. It’s a good move to inform the community moving into the future.

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