See Wright Differently

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See Wright Differently

Wright, one of the first suburbs to bring high-density living to Molonglo Valley. Photo: Region Media.

Where do you buy when you want an affordable family home in a newer suburb, but you don’t want to live too far north or south? For many Canberra homebuyers in the early 2010s, the answer was obvious: the Molonglo Valley suburb of Wright.

Bordered by Denman Prospect, Coombs, Duffy and Holder, Wright has been popular with first-home buyers and young families since the first sod was turned.

Thinking about visiting or moving to Wright? Here’s what you need to know.

Molonglo Valley river. Photo: File.

History

Wright is the first of 13 suburbs to be built in Canberra’s Molonglo Valley – a large-scale development project that will eventually connect Weston Creek to Belconnen.

Construction is mostly complete outside of a few apartment developments awaiting development approval and blocks in North Wright.

Wright is named after poet, environmentalist and Aboriginal land rights advocate Judith Wright. In a similar vein, the streets of Wright are named after environmentalists and poets.

Shops and eateries

Morning Dew

Morning Dew, Denman Prospect. Photo: File.

There are no local shops in Wright, but Denman Village is only a five-minute drive up the road. Denman Village has nine speciality stores including an IGA, Local Liquor, Capital Chemist and Club Lime. There is a shopping centre in Coombs, but the controversial development has just one tenant – Indian grocery and convenience store Ajijo.

A five-minute drive in the opposite direction will take you to Cooleman Court Shopping Centre, which has a Woolworths, Aldi, Target Country, chemist and various speciality stores and eateries.

Places of interest and things to do

The Molonglo Valley isn’t just popular with families. It’s also an appealing destination for anyone who enjoys getting back to nature. With this in mind, here are some of our favourite outdoor activities to enjoy around Wright:

  • Explore the Molonglo River Reserve. The Molonglo River runs alongside Coombs to Wright’s north. The reserve is home to native plants and animals including the endangered pink-tailed worm-lizard and superb parrot. Best explored by foot, you’ll find it hard to believe that you’re in the middle of Australia’s capital city.
  • Cycle at Stromlo Forest Park. Stromlo Forest Park is a world class sporting facility with mountain bike trails, running tracks and equestrian trails. But don’t think you need to be an athlete to enjoy the surrounds – Stromlo Forest Park and its surrounds are popular destinations for bushwalkers and nature enthusiasts, too.
  • Have a picnic at Cotter Reserve. Wright residents can reach the Cotter Reserve in less than 15 minutes – one of Canberra’s best places to enjoy a BBQ, a picnic and a swim in the river.

Playgrounds and parks

See Wright Differently

Argus Park is in Wright. Photo: Region Media.

Wright was designed with active living in mind. It’s no surprise, then, that there are plenty of parks and playgrounds to explore. These include:

  • Link Park (between Steve Irwin Avenue and Max Jacobs Avenue). Link Park has barbecue facilities, fitness equipment, a boardwalk and plenty of green space. It doesn’t have play equipment, but it’s still a popular spot for families.
  • Argus Park (Peter Cullen Way). Argus Park is a modern playground with a spider web and outdoor fitness equipment.
  • Wright Children’s Playground (corner Steve Irwin Avenue and Gornall Street). Better suited to children aged five years and older, Wright Children’s Playground has equipment including climbing cubes, a spider web and see saw. It’s partially shaded, too.
  • Wright Park (corner Serventy Street and Max Jacobs Avenue). Kids too young to play at Wright Children’s Playground may enjoy the smaller Wright Park, which has firetruck-themed climbing equipment.

Getting around

Natura in Denman Prospect

Aerial view of Natura in Denman Prospect. Image: Independent.

If you live in Wright and have access to a car, chances are you have a relatively easy commute to work. It’s a fast run into Belconnen via Coppins Crossing Road; proximity to Tuggeranong Parkway makes getting to Civic or Tuggeranong a breeze; and suburbs like Barton, Deakin and Kingston are accessible via the nearby Cotter Road.

Aerial view of Tuggeranong Parkway passing near National Arboretum in Canberra. Photo: File

Wright is also connected to Canberra’s bike path network, and you can cycle from Wright to Cooleman Court without going on the road. A lack of off-road cycling connections makes it a little trickier to get to Civic and Belconnen, however.

Bus routes R10 and 66 service Wright.

Schools

Schools near Wright include:

Why the locals love it

“Wright is a great suburb for families. There are three playgrounds within walking distance (perfect for my active toddler!), and my dog loves exploring around Mount Stromlo, which is almost right on our back doorstep. The traffic out of Wright during the morning commute, especially if you’re trying to get onto the Tuggeranong Parkway, can be a little bothersome; and we desperately need a good local shopping centre. But I’m happy we chose to raise our family somewhere central, in a house we built ourselves.” – Katherine, 30.

Quick facts

  • Median age: 30 years
  • Median weekly household income: $2323
  • Median weekly rent: $400
  • Houses vs. apartments: 34.3% houses; 49.6% apartments and 16.1% townhouses
  • Suburb sales record (excludes land sales): $1.44 million in 2017.

Source: 2016 Census.

See Wright Differently

Wright is only 15 minutes from the Cotter Reserve. Photo: Region Media.

Want to find the latest real estate listings for sale and rent in Wright? Zango can help you find them:

Do you live, or have you previously lived, in Wright? What are your favourite things about the suburb? What advice would you give to people considering moving there? Share your thoughts in the comments below.


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21 Responses to See Wright Differently
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MERC600 MERC600 1:06 pm 14 Apr 15

rubaiyat said :

justsomeaussie said :

When does the review of Googong happen. I can’t believe the prices in Wright and Gungahlan. We saved about $80,000 minimum on our book at Googon compared to similar in the ACT. People need to realise it’s only 10 minutes from Jerrabomerra with two new bypasses going in.

We got an even better deal on our MacMansion in Dalgety!

Our local member says he has a real good chance of having Myack Street upgraded to 4 lanes of divided freeway to cut the trip to Berridale to under 15 mins.

He says this is exactly the kind of infrastructure that Australia should be building for battlers like me who need the long commute to listen to the full series of Open University geosciences lectures from Alan Jones, on the way to work.

What a humerous piece. Possibly framed up whilst driving on some of the best roads the Nation ever built, whilst across the border too many country roads are those built over what was a bullock dray track.

rubaiyat rubaiyat 10:51 pm 13 Apr 15

justsomeaussie said :

When does the review of Googong happen. I can’t believe the prices in Wright and Gungahlan. We saved about $80,000 minimum on our book at Googon compared to similar in the ACT. People need to realise it’s only 10 minutes from Jerrabomerra with two new bypasses going in.

We got an even better deal on our MacMansion in Dalgety!

Our local member says he has a real good chance of having Myack Street upgraded to 4 lanes of divided freeway to cut the trip to Berridale to under 15 mins.

He says this is exactly the kind of infrastructure that Australia should be building for battlers like me who need the long commute to listen to the full series of Open University geosciences lectures from Alan Jones, on the way to work.

justsomeaussie justsomeaussie 7:45 pm 13 Apr 15

When does the review of Googong happen. I can’t believe the prices in Wright and Gungahlan. We saved about $80,000 minimum on our book at Googon compared to similar in the ACT. People need to realise it’s only 10 minutes from Jerrabomerra with two new bypasses going in.

MERC600 MERC600 6:25 pm 13 Apr 15

It will be interesting when all these souls wish to go to work in Civic, and go down that ramp leading onto the Parkway. It causes a bit of a backup even now.

MERC600 MERC600 6:22 pm 13 Apr 15

dungfungus said :

John Moulis said :

“Streets are named after: Environment, poets and butterflies”

So where does Steve Irwin Ave fit in?

Steve Irwin was “recycled” so that makes him part of the environment.

Ha ,,, touche Sir

watto23 watto23 1:24 pm 13 Apr 15

vintage123 said :

“The first is that it is possible to build a new, reasonably affordable home ” really, some friends of mine looked into building in wright and couldn’t find anything under $950k. I am not sure $950k is considered affordable.
http://www.allhomes.com.au/ah/act/sale-residential/18-serventy-street-wright-canberra/1316923197511

If there are people out there willing to pay $995k+ for this then they have a problem. The photos show old styled furniture and a modern house just don’t work either!

watto23 watto23 1:21 pm 13 Apr 15

Its a shame, because I watch Grand Designs (both UK and Australian versions) and they seem to get a lot more bang for buck than what we get in Canberra. I was hoping the mass PS sackings would burst the bubble, but it appears not.

I definitely think I will retire some place other than Canberra that’s for sure…. assuming I can actually afford to retire, or even reach whatever the retirement age will be.

rubaiyat rubaiyat 2:50 pm 12 Apr 15

John Moulis said :

“Streets are named after: Environment, poets and butterflies”

So where does Steve Irwin Ave fit in?

Steve Irwin, when he wasn’t annoying wildlife for the amusement of couch surfers was an avid and active Environmentalist. He is also dead. Gone are the days, hopefully, when some sleazy Sir Les Patterson can lean on his political mates to immortalise himself as road signage.

dungfungus dungfungus 4:52 pm 11 Apr 15

John Moulis said :

“Streets are named after: Environment, poets and butterflies”

So where does Steve Irwin Ave fit in?

Steve Irwin was “recycled” so that makes him part of the environment.

John Moulis John Moulis 3:24 pm 11 Apr 15

“Streets are named after: Environment, poets and butterflies”

So where does Steve Irwin Ave fit in?

khaleesi khaleesi 8:37 pm 10 Apr 15

vintage123 said :

G’day chewy, I agree, I think this one sums up how we both feel, McMansions, small blocks, close living and waaaaayyyyyy overpriced.
http://www.allhomes.com.au/ah/act/sale-residential/8-tishler-street-wright-canberra/1316850689011

Bloody hell that is not cheap for what it is! Am astonished

GardeningGirl GardeningGirl 7:09 pm 10 Apr 15

chewy14 said :

I don’t know about not trying to jam as many monstrous houses onto tiny blocks as possible. The average block size is only 500 odd square metres and most of the houses tend towards the McMansion.

Good place to live if you enjoy looking out of your bedroom window at your fence and/or neigbours house. It should encourage some very close knit community living.

Some of the houses have, or will have, very pleasant views out to the front. But sides and back look straight at fences and those bedrooms in the display homes with thin high windows for privacy I reckon feel like prisons. That’s going too far with ‘affordable easy care’ blocks when you can’t have normal windows in a bedroom.

vintage123 said :

I just spent some time looking at the wright offerings for sale and I think something very dodgy is going on out there. Most of the prices are for the house only not the land. How can someone who qualifies for the land rent scheme afford to pay $890k for the house only, not inclusive of land.
http://www.allhomes.com.au/ah/act/sale-residential/5-tishler-street-wright-canberra/1316903497611
This link is a prime example, it’s the price for the house only….WOW am I missing something here, so someone on land rent approval for affordable housing is meant to buy this – smells like a rat to me.

I’ve been wondering about some of those land rent ads myself (I think I’ve seen ones in Gungahlin too). Surprisingly luxurious.

rubaiyat rubaiyat 7:04 pm 10 Apr 15

Amy Birchall said :

chewy14 said :

I don’t know about not trying to jam as many monstrous houses onto tiny blocks as possible. The average block size is only 500 odd square metres and most of the houses tend towards the McMansion.

The building restrictions in Wright are tighter than in other suburbs, which I assume is in part to minimise the McMansion effect.

4 and 5 bedroom houses on 550 sq m blocks sounds like McMansion to me!

rubaiyat rubaiyat 6:47 pm 10 Apr 15

Just had a look at the Land Rent Scheme.

Wow, looks like Hire Purchase for land!

You build a totally non-portable asset, your building, on something that you do not have long term title over. As you keep paying, you don’t lose your building.

I can’t see any real savings for the purchaser, just the strong likelihood that they will pretend this is freehold, just as everyone has pretended that leasehold is freehold.

The government, developers and financers of this scheme are using the complexity and drip charges to basically overcharge the purchasers, as far as I can see. A lot of people are going to make a lot of money out of the optimistic suggestable punters out there, which will be why this will be the “Next Great Thing”.

Rush in, don’t miss out!

rubaiyat rubaiyat 6:12 pm 10 Apr 15

More eyewash about a “green” suburb, just like as they did with Gungahlin. More land going under mediocre suburban subdivisions.

The usual oversized houses on tiny blocks, poorly oriented and with lousy, next to non-existent, public transport.

They also are ignoring that it is in the path of another bushfire disaster, as they grow more firewood above it in the Arboretum where it all burnt down not so long ago..

There is no transport easement, just roads and the infrequent buses take a quarter hour to get you to that garden of delights, the Woden Bus Interchange, where you get to wait for another bus to take you to where you really want to go.

Net result people will drive. Surprise, surprise.

When are we ever going to see a comprehensive plan for transport in the ACT?

vintage123 vintage123 1:24 pm 10 Apr 15

I just spent some time looking at the wright offerings for sale and I think something very dodgy is going on out there. Most of the prices are for the house only not the land. How can someone who qualifies for the land rent scheme afford to pay $890k for the house only, not inclusive of land.
http://www.allhomes.com.au/ah/act/sale-residential/5-tishler-street-wright-canberra/1316903497611
This link is a prime example, it’s the price for the house only….WOW am I missing something here, so someone on land rent approval for affordable housing is meant to buy this – smells like a rat to me.

vintage123 vintage123 1:15 pm 10 Apr 15

chewy14 said :

I don’t know about not trying to jam as many monstrous houses onto tiny blocks as possible. The average block size is only 500 odd square metres and most of the houses tend towards the McMansion.

Good place to live if you enjoy looking out of your bedroom window at your fence and/or neigbours house. It should encourage some very close knit community living.

G’day chewy, I agree, I think this one sums up how we both feel, McMansions, small blocks, close living and waaaaayyyyyy overpriced.
http://www.allhomes.com.au/ah/act/sale-residential/8-tishler-street-wright-canberra/1316850689011

Amy Birchall Amy Birchall 12:56 pm 10 Apr 15

chewy14 said :

I don’t know about not trying to jam as many monstrous houses onto tiny blocks as possible. The average block size is only 500 odd square metres and most of the houses tend towards the McMansion.

The building restrictions in Wright are tighter than in other suburbs, which I assume is in part to minimise the McMansion effect.

chewy14 chewy14 12:10 pm 10 Apr 15

I don’t know about not trying to jam as many monstrous houses onto tiny blocks as possible. The average block size is only 500 odd square metres and most of the houses tend towards the McMansion.

Good place to live if you enjoy looking out of your bedroom window at your fence and/or neigbours house. It should encourage some very close knit community living.

Amy Birchall Amy Birchall 11:36 am 10 Apr 15

vintage123 said :

“The first is that it is possible to build a new, reasonably affordable home ” really, some friends of mine looked into building in wright and couldn’t find anything under $950k. I am not sure $950k is considered affordable.
http://www.allhomes.com.au/ah/act/sale-residential/18-serventy-street-wright-canberra/1316923197511

The suburb was definitely more affordable before they changed the terms of the land rent scheme a little while ago. Some of the houses in the suburb are outrageously expensive, but I know families who’ve built lovely homes for much cheaper than $950k too.

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