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The property council infrastructure wishlist

By johnboy 26 November 2008 59

[First filed: November 25, 2008 @ 13:03]

The ACT division of the Property Council has announced their wishlist of the top ten boondoggles pump priming money could be hosed at in the ACT.

They are:

  1. Very Fast Train (VFT)
    The Property Council proposes that the Commonwealth, State and Territory Governments investigate the economic viability, social value and environmental impact of a very fast rail link between Canberra and Sydney using a cost-benefit analysis comparison between a VFT and the upgrade of the existing Sydney-Canberra rail line. This nation building project would link Canberra International Airport to east coast capital cities, Sydney International Airport and Sydney itself.
  2. Water, Sewer Upgrade
    Investment is needed in new capacity building water delivery. In particular, augmenting and replacing existing water supply infrastructure and sewer services to inner suburbs is required to support and facilitate new development and minimise Canberra’s ecological footprint.
  3. Constitution Avenue Duplication and Redevelopment
    A major upgrade of Constitution Avenue, including road works, renovation and expansion is urgently needed to create a quality urban streetscape and avoid future traffic gridlock. Two traffic lanes in each direction (one with public transport priority), on-street parking and allowance for future light rail (or similar) are necessary. The redevelopment should transform Constitution Avenue into a lively tree-lined boulevard accommodating shops, cafes, and commercial buildings. It will allow Canberrans to travel to and from work in the precinct efficiently and safely, providing productivity and life-work balance gains.
  4. Data Centre
    Industry needs a new data centre, ideally driven by a clean energy source. Canberra has the potential to house a new data centre, and become home to a major new industry. Housing this project in Canberra would broaden the economic base of the ACT, provide jobs growth in new areas through development and operation, and help secure the region’s energy supply.
  5. Monaro Highway Extension to the Federal Highway
    A heavy-vehicle bypass of central Canberra could be achieved with a north-south route between the Federal Highway (north of Canberra) and the Monaro Highway. This would require duplication of Majura Road and a flyover rationalising the Moreshead Drive, Pialligo Avenue, Majura Road bottleneck. Linking the Monaro Highway and Federal Highways would provide an alternative route for commuters between Gungahlin and Tuggeranong and enhance access to Hume, Fyshwick, Queanbeyan and Canberra International Airport. This would alleviate bottlenecks and delays around the airport and improve freight links with other cities.
  6. New Convention Centre
    Canberra needs a new 3000-delegate capacity convention centre in a central location. This facility will attract increased convention business to Canberra and cater for the increasing needs of a growing city. The new centre should be in close proximity to city facilities, including hotels, restaurants, shops, the Canberra theatre precinct and other amenities, and be easily accessible via various modes of transport.
  7. Kings Highway Upgrade
    The Commonwealth, ACT and NSW Governments should jointly fund a long-term development plan for the Kings Highway, to ensure an efficient and safe transport route, optimising regional economic and social benefits.
  8. Inter-town Public Transport Corridors
    Through designated key transport corridors and longer term infrastructure and land use planning, a more sustainable hierarchy of transport networks can be established.
  9. Urban Transit Nodes
    To enable a more viable public transport system and improve its commercial opportunities, park and ride facilities should be developed at key nodes. It is also urgent and important to review, rationalise and deliver car parking in all major retail and employment centres to equitably provide long and short stay paid parking. Car parking in Civic, the town centres, the Barton/Parkes area and Russell Hill should be included as part of a holistic sustainable transport plan.
  10. New Residential Aged Care Facilities
    Meeting current and future needs in low care will provide a natural life ‘feed in’ to high care accommodation, including hostels and nursing homes. Demand is anticipated to increase steadily in future years, requiring land release and in some areas rezoning, to meet requirements.

Chief Minister Stanhope has announced his pleasure at being provided with this list.

    A number of priorities on the Property Council’s list coincide with the ACT Government’s own thinking and planning. For example, the Very Fast Train and the upgrade of the Monaro Highway are two of the projects submitted by the ACT Government to Infrastructure Australia for funding consideration.

    “The Property Council’s report is a valuable addition to the ACT Government’s own efforts to plan and shape the smart and green city we want Canberra to be. I look forward to continuing this conversation with the Property Council and other peak bodies through the soon to be formed Infrastructure Advisory Group,” Mr Stanhope said.

What’s Your opinion?


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The property council infrastructure wishlist
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Hdopler 1:44 pm 27 Nov 08

sepi said :

A lot of the ABC childcare centres were community run until being bought out by ABC. They should never have been allowed to corner the market.

Yup, and Temasek/GIC should have never been allowed to pump as much equity into ABC – or Optus – as they have either.

thetruth 1:29 am 27 Nov 08

sepi said :

A lot of the ABC childcare centres were community run until being bought out by ABC. They should never have been allowed to corner the market.

Sepi – Why did the community groups sell them? Who gets the dough when a community group sells a childcare centre? One would presume that the community group must have been struggling to resort to selling their centre.

sepi 9:55 pm 26 Nov 08

A lot of the ABC childcare centres were community run until being bought out by ABC. They should never have been allowed to corner the market.

monomania 8:33 pm 26 Nov 08

Industry needs a new data centre, ideally driven by a clean energy source.

The trouble with clean energy sources is that the electricity is very expensive. That means that the community has to subsidise the cost so that the data centre can compete with others using coal fired electricity. Now we might decide to do this for the data that is essential for the running of our own community. This is not what is being planned for Canberra Technology City. Only a small part of the data being processed will be ours. The A.C.T. cannot afford to subsidise the Commonwealth Government, Google, Shell, Mitsubishi or other private multinational companies that might choose to use this facility, nor should we.

thetruth 7:33 pm 26 Nov 08

johnboy said :

sepi said :

Logging is a bit of a welfare industry too – paying people to do something noone wants them to do, because it is the only thing they can do.

Childcare though – this is going to be a bigger and bigger social issue in the next few years and I don’t think it’s a welfare issue.

Childcare IS huge.

Running it as a government subsidised pyramid scheme is not the solution to it.

Childcare should be government provided just like primary and secondary education with the private sector existing for those who choose to pay extra.

While I actually agree – the issue will be like all govet provided services education, health and transport. the public system will be under funded and badly run, parents will flock to private. Despite the current mess, how much investment would have been required to build up a network like ABC and provide those places. Don’t forget more private money was lost than public – even with the rescue. I doubt any Government could have made that investment.

Lets not get too carried away with the virtues of public provision of services – it does not have a great history of success. In fact I would love to hear of one good example (not an individual school or hospital but as a system – good individuals can make a place great regardless of ownership – Anslie Primary under Prue Clarke was brilliant, but fell away quickly.) Australia Post is pretty good.

thetruth 2:00 pm 26 Nov 08

The cat did it said :

Can I have some of whatever thetruth is smoking? This hairy-chested business sector in Australia has always been about capitalising the gains and socialising the losses, as the current economic debacle (sorry, ‘correction’) demonstrates. Running around telling all and sundry that they’re the salt of the earth. If they were as good as they claim, they wouldn’t be holding their hands out now.

When you tax it you are socialising the profits (30% and when it goes to the owner it is taxed at 48.5%) plus payroll tax and plus stamp duties.

Let run an experiment lets isolate out the business sector and see what happens to individuals, health, welfare, police. The business sector is what make everything else happen look at countries with poor business sectors how well are the poor and sick looked after there??

I gave up smoking a long time ago. Stop the privatised profits and socialised losses debate because its bull –

Mr_Shab 12:54 pm 26 Nov 08

I’m in favour of all this development on the proviso that Canberra is renamed “Fat City”, thereby discouraging and influx of profiteering developers.

Aaagh! Get out of my head Hunter S Thompson!

sepi 12:04 pm 26 Nov 08

yes – that’s what I think too.

It amazes me that when the govt sees a sector that’s not going well, like childcare, their response is to come down hard on them. Not surprising it didn’t improve matters.

johnboy 11:56 am 26 Nov 08

sepi said :

Logging is a bit of a welfare industry too – paying people to do something noone wants them to do, because it is the only thing they can do.

Childcare though – this is going to be a bigger and bigger social issue in the next few years and I don’t think it’s a welfare issue.

Childcare IS huge.

Running it as a government subsidised pyramid scheme is not the solution to it.

Childcare should be government provided just like primary and secondary education with the private sector existing for those who choose to pay extra.

dexi 11:43 am 26 Nov 08

Logging old-growth is the worst rip off of resource going on in this country. Grrrrrrr. Shame on you Gunns.

dexi 11:43 am 26 Nov 08

Logging old-growth is the worst rip off, of resource going on in this country. Grrrrrrr.

sepi 11:37 am 26 Nov 08

Logging is a bit of a welfare industry too – paying people to do something noone wants them to do, because it is the only thing they can do.

Childcare though – this is going to be a bigger and bigger social issue in the next few years and I don’t think it’s a welfare issue.

housebound 11:18 am 26 Nov 08

Many people think of anything that doesn’t benefit them personally as welfare. Oh, the selfish times we live in.

That’s how the Property Council can pretend that government handouts to its interests aren’t welfare.

The cat did it 11:16 am 26 Nov 08

Can I have some of whatever thetruth is smoking? This hairy-chested business sector in Australia has always been about capitalising the gains and socialising the losses, as the current economic debacle (sorry, ‘correction’) demonstrates. Running around telling all and sundry that they’re the salt of the earth. If they were as good as they claim, they wouldn’t be holding their hands out now.

dexi 11:01 am 26 Nov 08

Sorry, its just showing my ignorance. I see a sector being a region on some magical pie chart.

johnboy 10:52 am 26 Nov 08

Welfare recipients flatter themselves to be an economic “sector”

They’re money taken from the productive, put to a use that’s slightly better than some of the alternatives.

I include tax farming child care centres, and the automotive industry, in that list.

dexi 10:49 am 26 Nov 08

Thetruth.”Who do you think earns the income to pay the individuals”
The individuals do with their labor. That’s what they are paid for

“In case you haven’t noticed a recession means businesses don’t do well”
The recession is caused by business not doing well (Rampant greed). They just do worse in a recession.

Maybe the whole economy is a bit to advanced for me. So I would need help.

If $97 billion is spent on welfare, what would be the total turn over of buisness in Australia?

I want to know how much money is in the rest of the economy getting?

How much are the non welfare sector earning?

Its just my $420 a fortnight doesn’t seem to be that much to what others are earning.

thetruth 10:43 am 26 Nov 08

nomnomnom said :

@thetruth: Using your same logic, it is the individual walfare that provides the people the money to buy the items that drive the businesses.

It is one big circle, businesses get hand outs to grow and provide jobs, individuals get hand outs to keep them alive and to stimulate business growth. Welfare being given to consumers is the ultimate test of market forces, much like cutting taxes, they give people the right to choose what they want to spent their money on and how they want the market to grow. The only difference between a tax cut and a welfare increase is that rich people get tax cuts and poor people get hand outs.

Giving money directly to businesses allows them to grow in a manner not supported by the market, and is, by definition, inherently centralist and anti-competitive in nature.

Yes – BUT the economy is not a closed system. business sells stuff overseas (export) and this grows the pie and when people get consumption dollars they can choose to buy locally made or overseas made stuff (import). So the tax system has to allow business to compete on a global scale.

The $97 billion in welfare payments is not all to those that deserve it. just raise the tax free threshold to $20k and get rid of the public servants that handle the tax and pay back system that Howard institutionalised – very inefficient

nomnomnom 8:51 am 26 Nov 08

@thetruth: Using your same logic, it is the individual walfare that provides the people the money to buy the items that drive the businesses.

It is one big circle, businesses get hand outs to grow and provide jobs, individuals get hand outs to keep them alive and to stimulate business growth. Welfare being given to consumers is the ultimate test of market forces, much like cutting taxes, they give people the right to choose what they want to spent their money on and how they want the market to grow. The only difference between a tax cut and a welfare increase is that rich people get tax cuts and poor people get hand outs.

Giving money directly to businesses allows them to grow in a manner not supported by the market, and is, by definition, inherently centralist and anti-competitive in nature.

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