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The solution to ineffective speed cameras in the ACT is…

Rollersk8r 18 May 2015 23

stock-car-traffic-speed-camera

You guessed it – more cameras!! The Canberra Times reports the astonishing finding that we’re not being fined often enough because we’re used to the cameras, so we need more cameras to re-learn our lesson.

This is just like The Simpsons episode where Homer makes rules against everything and learns it’s not possible to police everything all of the time. Although I suppose it is possible to enforce speeding all of the time – just need a camera operating on every street; there’d be zero speeding and zero accidents, ever. Brilliant! Let’s do it!

Correct me if I’m wrong, but I swore earlier media said this report would consider the removal or reduction of cameras if they were shown to be ineffective. But no, just need some different rules for how ineffective fixed cameras operate. Cameras at intersections are actually shown to increase rear-end accidents, which I’ve always suspected, but this is ok because they reduced side-on accidents.

I’ve never had a fine from a camera, I’ve never had an accident in more than 20 years of driving in the ACT and I even cycle to work (partly on the road) more than half the time.  Yet it still irks me that rules, rules, rules, fines, fines, fines is always the answer…


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The solution to ineffective speed cameras in the ACT is…
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Fritz 1:44 am 21 May 15

FHW said :

The solution to ineffective speed cameras in the ACT is…

To ask ourselves what they are for. Is it to save lives/accidents? Then simply add a distance checker to calculate if any two cars are travelling closer than three seconds apart.

Many accidents are initiated by things such as sudden slowing down or erratic driving. People will always have their odd moment: the sneeze, the spider on the steering wheel, the sudden jolt of remembering that we’ve left the iron on. People don’t drive perfectly, because they are human. But what turns these trivial moments into an accident? The person behind who is unable to count to three seconds and keep their distance.

It is easy: you watch a car pass a landmark (lamppost, bridge or sign) and count “one elephant two elephant three elephant”. If you pass that landmark before “three elephant” you are too close. Students learn about three seconds distance in their Road Ready but they unfortunately copy what they see on the road.

FWH, you are 100% correct and have far more intelligence that the people governing this city… have you thought about going into politics?

Paul2913 11:43 pm 20 May 15

The ACT Government is trying to scrape together money to pay for their train. So they are going to waste more money on ineffective speed cameras so that they can catch unsuspecting people who are doing 10% over the speed limit.

This has nothing to do with safety. As other contributors have pointed out tailgating in the ACT is a huge problem, and represents a far greater safety risk than speeding… but it’s harder for the Government to make money out of it. Running red lights is also a big issue, but like speed cameras the red-light cameras are ineffective… we need police spot-checking intersections.

At least our current ACT Government is consistent… one ridiculous idea after another.

VYBerlinaV8_is_back 6:58 pm 20 May 15

We know that visible speed cameras cause traffic to slow in their presence, so how about putting them into school zones?

Mysteryman 5:02 pm 20 May 15

MrBigEars said :

I like speed cameras. It’s the only legal way to tax stupid people.

You forgot cigarettes and alcohol.

switch 4:44 pm 20 May 15

Leon said :

We should give more credit to the selfless drivers who do their bit to fund our budget deficit by paying voluntary taxes in the form of speeding fines.

So they can buy us more speed cameras?

Leon 3:31 pm 20 May 15

We should give more credit to the selfless drivers who do their bit to fund our budget deficit by paying voluntary taxes in the form of speeding fines.

MrBigEars 8:50 am 19 May 15

I like speed cameras. It’s the only legal way to tax stupid people.

Nightshade 11:59 pm 18 May 15

Evilomlap said :

There’s also an odd mentality I see that is almost exclusively Canberran – a strange obsession with being the first off when the light turns green. I see it all the time here but I have rarely if ever seen it in other cities – people changing lanes at the last minute when approaching a red light to ensure that they are not stopped behind someone at the light. It’s really strange.

I suspect that’s due to the snail-like pace at which many drivers take off from a green light. It’s not about being first, just not being stuck behind someone who takes forever to get up to speed and seems unaware that everyone behind them would like to get through the lights too.

Pork Hunt 10:19 pm 18 May 15

Every accident and incident on the road or in the work place has a chain of events that leads to it.
Once you break a link in that chain of events, you can decrease the chance of the event occurring.
For example, If the people that Mully killed had left home 30 sec earlier or later on that day, they would still be alive.
A speed camera assigning a time and date and speed to a motor vehicle at random is hardly going to prevent a road death since the driver gets the message about three weeks from offence.
I guess that the average driver that dies in a crash finds out about a nano second before impact that they are going to die.
What we need to do is somehow increase the decision time available to the driver before impact to prevent this happening. A speed camera on a straight stretch of the Parkway helps us how?

HiddenDragon 5:32 pm 18 May 15

Rollersk8r said :

I got some instant karma for posting this quick rant – pulled over by the police, for the first time in my life, for checking my phone while stopped at the lights. It’s uncanny…

Proof of the conspiracy I’d say.

To go back to where you started this entirely worthy rant, the consequence of effective speed cameras would still have been the same – i.e. more cameras. Whatever the question, the answer in this town (for most of us, anyway) is “rules, rules, rules, fines, fines, fines”.

Felix the Cat 4:53 pm 18 May 15

Garfield said :

Surely the public would receive more benefit from there being more police on the roads rather than more fixed locations covered by speed cameras.

Yes but it is more cost effective to install a speed camera. A camera will generate much more revenue than a police officer. Also, cameras don’t take sickies or holidays or require office space.

vintage123 4:27 pm 18 May 15

Every single time I near a speed camera, this is what I see. Cars speeding, then brakes on, slow down, past camera and speed up again. Mmm makes me think, why do we tell drivers where the camera is? Hidden cameras is probably the best option to deter speeding as drivers probably won’t take the risk if they don’t know where the cameras are. Or point to point cameras or even better as they control the average speed between two points, sometimes of great distance.

Evilomlap 4:19 pm 18 May 15

FHW said :

The solution to ineffective speed cameras in the ACT is…

To ask ourselves what they are for. Is it to save lives/accidents? Then simply add a distance checker to calculate if any two cars are travelling closer than three seconds apart.

Many accidents are initiated by things such as sudden slowing down or erratic driving. People will always have their odd moment: the sneeze, the spider on the steering wheel, the sudden jolt of remembering that we’ve left the iron on. People don’t drive perfectly, because they are human. But what turns these trivial moments into an accident? The person behind who is unable to count to three seconds and keep their distance.

It is easy: you watch a car pass a landmark (lamppost, bridge or sign) and count “one elephant two elephant three elephant”. If you pass that landmark before “three elephant” you are too close. Students learn about three seconds distance in their Road Ready but they unfortunately copy what they see on the road.

Sadly it’s not to save lives. Speed cameras are judged on their effectiveness by how much money they pull in. If they are not presenting a good return on investment, they are relocated. It’s also why red light cameras are never installed at smaller intersections. They are installed at major intersections because statistically, more cars will run the red if there’s high volume traffic. The most effective deterrent and method of catching people speeding are radar guns and unmarked vehicles who catch a speeder in the act. Unfortunately there’s nowhere near enough of either to make any real difference.

There’s also an odd mentality I see that is almost exclusively Canberran – a strange obsession with being the first off when the light turns green. I see it all the time here but I have rarely if ever seen it in other cities – people changing lanes at the last minute when approaching a red light to ensure that they are not stopped behind someone at the light. It’s really strange.

JC 4:12 pm 18 May 15

OP it is a bit more complex than that. What is, shock horror ineffective are fixed cameras, so the medicine is more mobile cameras that can be set-up anywhere.

Cannot wait to see them more in the suburban streets where idiots fly through what are mostly 50km/h streets like they are racing at Bathurst.

Holden Caulfield 4:05 pm 18 May 15

bryansworld said :

FHW said :

The solution to ineffective speed cameras in the ACT is…

To ask ourselves what they are for. Is it to save lives/accidents? Then simply add a distance checker to calculate if any two cars are travelling closer than three seconds apart.

Many accidents are initiated by things such as sudden slowing down or erratic driving. People will always have their odd moment: the sneeze, the spider on the steering wheel, the sudden jolt of remembering that we’ve left the iron on. People don’t drive perfectly, because they are human. But what turns these trivial moments into an accident? The person behind who is unable to count to three seconds and keep their distance.

It is easy: you watch a car pass a landmark (lamppost, bridge or sign) and count “one elephant two elephant three elephant”. If you pass that landmark before “three elephant” you are too close. Students learn about three seconds distance in their Road Ready but they unfortunately copy what they see on the road.

I try to do this. But then someone almost always takes the gap that I’ve left! Grrrrrrrrrrrr.

It could be worse, they could try and take one of your elephants.

bryansworld 3:37 pm 18 May 15

FHW said :

The solution to ineffective speed cameras in the ACT is…

To ask ourselves what they are for. Is it to save lives/accidents? Then simply add a distance checker to calculate if any two cars are travelling closer than three seconds apart.

Many accidents are initiated by things such as sudden slowing down or erratic driving. People will always have their odd moment: the sneeze, the spider on the steering wheel, the sudden jolt of remembering that we’ve left the iron on. People don’t drive perfectly, because they are human. But what turns these trivial moments into an accident? The person behind who is unable to count to three seconds and keep their distance.

It is easy: you watch a car pass a landmark (lamppost, bridge or sign) and count “one elephant two elephant three elephant”. If you pass that landmark before “three elephant” you are too close. Students learn about three seconds distance in their Road Ready but they unfortunately copy what they see on the road.

I try to do this. But then someone almost always takes the gap that I’ve left! Grrrrrrrrrrrr.

Rollersk8r 3:28 pm 18 May 15

Garfield said :

What about all the accidents that occur at speeds below the limit? Speed cameras will have no effect there, or if they do they will increase the number of accidents as people slow down even further to ensure they don’t get booked. What about instances of dangerous driving that don’t involve speeding? You know those drivers aggressively weaving in and out of lanes and sitting right up behind other vehicles in the hope that it will force them to drive faster or get out of the way. Surely the public would receive more benefit from there being more police on the roads rather than more fixed locations covered by speed cameras.

Absolutely – driver behaviour is a lot more complex than: fines = lesson learned = less accidents and deaths. I clearly remember a few years ago we had ZERO fatal accidents in a year in the ACT. So did everyone just take a break from speeding for 12 months??

FHW 3:22 pm 18 May 15

The solution to ineffective speed cameras in the ACT is…

To ask ourselves what they are for. Is it to save lives/accidents? Then simply add a distance checker to calculate if any two cars are travelling closer than three seconds apart.

Many accidents are initiated by things such as sudden slowing down or erratic driving. People will always have their odd moment: the sneeze, the spider on the steering wheel, the sudden jolt of remembering that we’ve left the iron on. People don’t drive perfectly, because they are human. But what turns these trivial moments into an accident? The person behind who is unable to count to three seconds and keep their distance.

It is easy: you watch a car pass a landmark (lamppost, bridge or sign) and count “one elephant two elephant three elephant”. If you pass that landmark before “three elephant” you are too close. Students learn about three seconds distance in their Road Ready but they unfortunately copy what they see on the road.

Rollersk8r 3:12 pm 18 May 15

I got some instant karma for posting this quick rant – pulled over by the police, for the first time in my life, for checking my phone while stopped at the lights. It’s uncanny…

Garfield 1:23 pm 18 May 15

What about all the accidents that occur at speeds below the limit? Speed cameras will have no effect there, or if they do they will increase the number of accidents as people slow down even further to ensure they don’t get booked. What about instances of dangerous driving that don’t involve speeding? You know those drivers aggressively weaving in and out of lanes and sitting right up behind other vehicles in the hope that it will force them to drive faster or get out of the way. Surely the public would receive more benefit from there being more police on the roads rather than more fixed locations covered by speed cameras.

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