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What can I do about an overgrown hedge ?

By mp2615 - 20 February 2015 14

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It’s not a nature strip issue. The hedge is growing in the neighbour’s yard, along the side fence.  It’s higher than a two-storey house and it blocks the light in the downstairs rooms.

I’ve pruned it back to the fence but the sheer height of the photinia still causes an issue for reaching the canopy.

There is apparently nothing ACT Government can do except offer a phone number for the conflict resolution service. Requests have been made, and help offered to the neighbour all to no avail.

Any suggestions? Is this possibly a matter for ACAT? Thanks.

What’s Your opinion?


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14 Responses to
What can I do about an overgrown hedge ?
GreenEdge_GardenScap 10:22 am 02 Jun 15

Hi mp2615 if still need advice let me know.
Deteails are below and for anyone else here who needs a horticulturist and Landscaper

https://www.facebook.com/GreenEdgeGardenScape
0435821095
Kindest Regards
Andres
GreenEdge Gardenscape
Horticulturist & Landscaper

dungfungus 8:33 pm 20 Feb 15

JC said :

dungfungus said :

“There are rules pertaining to shading from buildings, but not from vegetation. This is something that needs rules too, to protect solar access.”
You have highlighted one of those things the government puts in the “too hard basket’.
It’s the same as the barking dog problem.
I am not a botanist but trees and shrubs on the other side of the fence have roots which go in all directions. They can be discouraged to grow. End message.

Government does nothing gets accused of putting in too hard basket, government does something and gets accused of creating a nanny state. Cannot win.

JC said :

dungfungus said :

“There are rules pertaining to shading from buildings, but not from vegetation. This is something that needs rules too, to protect solar access.”
You have highlighted one of those things the government puts in the “too hard basket’.
It’s the same as the barking dog problem.
I am not a botanist but trees and shrubs on the other side of the fence have roots which go in all directions. They can be discouraged to grow. End message.

Government does nothing gets accused of putting in too hard basket, government does something and gets accused of creating a nanny state. Cannot win.

You say they cannot win, I say they capitulate.

JC 8:15 pm 20 Feb 15

dungfungus said :

“There are rules pertaining to shading from buildings, but not from vegetation. This is something that needs rules too, to protect solar access.”
You have highlighted one of those things the government puts in the “too hard basket’.
It’s the same as the barking dog problem.
I am not a botanist but trees and shrubs on the other side of the fence have roots which go in all directions. They can be discouraged to grow. End message.

Government does nothing gets accused of putting in too hard basket, government does something and gets accused of creating a nanny state. Cannot win.

dungfungus 4:25 pm 20 Feb 15

Maya123 said :

dungfungus said :

Masquara said :

rosscoact said :

As you have noticed the government is incapable of helping in these sort of disputes but you can use this to your advantage.

Assuming that your relationship with your neighbour is irretrievably broken down, just cut the hedge down from your side while your neighbour isn’t home. ACT government won’t intervene and it’s not worth anybody’s time and money to pursue civil action so you’re home and hosed.

If your relationship with the neighbour isn’t irretrievably broken down, it will be by the time this is ver.

The neighbour is likely to respond with a row of fast-growing, nasty dense eucalypt that will go even taller.

They can be Round-ed Up.

Some natives also do not like fertiliser. I heard of someone fertilising their lawn and a row of natives against the neighbour’s fence dropped dead. This was unintentional, but if too big natives are planted perhaps your lawn could need a lot of fertiliser.

That was as subtle as a brick in flight. ha ha.

pajs 4:16 pm 20 Feb 15

BubbaOogle said :

I’d just flat out ask the neighbour if you can trim it to fence height – don’t offer help, offer to do it!
(my Dad had the same problem and now happily does all the trimming of that hedge).

Best advice, I reckon. For me, I can’t stand photinia, so would offer to sort out removing the hedge and replacing it with something better, including keeping it trimmed to an agreed height.

Maya123 4:15 pm 20 Feb 15

dungfungus said :

Masquara said :

rosscoact said :

As you have noticed the government is incapable of helping in these sort of disputes but you can use this to your advantage.

Assuming that your relationship with your neighbour is irretrievably broken down, just cut the hedge down from your side while your neighbour isn’t home. ACT government won’t intervene and it’s not worth anybody’s time and money to pursue civil action so you’re home and hosed.

If your relationship with the neighbour isn’t irretrievably broken down, it will be by the time this is ver.

The neighbour is likely to respond with a row of fast-growing, nasty dense eucalypt that will go even taller.

They can be Round-ed Up.

Some natives also do not like fertiliser. I heard of someone fertilising their lawn and a row of natives against the neighbour’s fence dropped dead. This was unintentional, but if too big natives are planted perhaps your lawn could need a lot of fertiliser.

dungfungus 3:55 pm 20 Feb 15

Masquara said :

rosscoact said :

As you have noticed the government is incapable of helping in these sort of disputes but you can use this to your advantage.

Assuming that your relationship with your neighbour is irretrievably broken down, just cut the hedge down from your side while your neighbour isn’t home. ACT government won’t intervene and it’s not worth anybody’s time and money to pursue civil action so you’re home and hosed.

If your relationship with the neighbour isn’t irretrievably broken down, it will be by the time this is ver.

The neighbour is likely to respond with a row of fast-growing, nasty dense eucalypt that will go even taller.

They can be Round-ed Up.

Masquara 3:24 pm 20 Feb 15

rosscoact said :

As you have noticed the government is incapable of helping in these sort of disputes but you can use this to your advantage.

Assuming that your relationship with your neighbour is irretrievably broken down, just cut the hedge down from your side while your neighbour isn’t home. ACT government won’t intervene and it’s not worth anybody’s time and money to pursue civil action so you’re home and hosed.

If your relationship with the neighbour isn’t irretrievably broken down, it will be by the time this is ver.

The neighbour is likely to respond with a row of fast-growing, nasty dense eucalypt that will go even taller.

Masquara 3:23 pm 20 Feb 15

Looks as though your predecessor on your side might have got the neighbour offside at some point, and you’re paying!

dungfungus 3:20 pm 20 Feb 15

Maya123 said :

I believe the rules are that you can cut any over hanging branches, but those branches belong to the neighbour and must be given to them. In effect though this is likely to cause conflict between you and your neighbour, and so I would consider carefully first whether to do this. However the issue of shading is serious and so talk to your neighbour and explain the situation. If they refuse to be reasonable, even compromise, only then would I return their branches and leaves to them. And each and every time you trim the hedge.
There are rules pertaining to shading from buildings, but not from vegetation. This is something that needs rules too, to protect solar access.
I have a thick nuisance cypress type tree next-door, but fortunately on the south side of my house, so it doesn’t block the sun. It hangs over my fence and continuously drops it’s leaves making a big mess, on the ground and the roof. My roof is a catchment area for my large water tank, so this is not good. I offered the neighbour to pay half the cost of removal of the tree, but the neighbour refused. I had some workmen in and all the branches hanging over the fence (2.5metres plus into my yard) cut off. The workmen took one look at the (not attractive) tree and asked why it wasn’t all cut down. I didn’t return the branches to the neighbour though to keep the peace, and also because the neighbour rents out the house and this would have inconvenienced the tenant more than the owner. I am thinking this exercise needs to be repeated again soon.

“There are rules pertaining to shading from buildings, but not from vegetation. This is something that needs rules too, to protect solar access.”
You have highlighted one of those things the government puts in the “too hard basket’.
It’s the same as the barking dog problem.
I am not a botanist but trees and shrubs on the other side of the fence have roots which go in all directions. They can be discouraged to grow. End message.

BubbaOogle 3:00 pm 20 Feb 15

I’d just flat out ask the neighbour if you can trim it to fence height – don’t offer help, offer to do it!
(my Dad had the same problem and now happily does all the trimming of that hedge).

Maya123 12:58 pm 20 Feb 15

I believe the rules are that you can cut any over hanging branches, but those branches belong to the neighbour and must be given to them. In effect though this is likely to cause conflict between you and your neighbour, and so I would consider carefully first whether to do this. However the issue of shading is serious and so talk to your neighbour and explain the situation. If they refuse to be reasonable, even compromise, only then would I return their branches and leaves to them. And each and every time you trim the hedge.
There are rules pertaining to shading from buildings, but not from vegetation. This is something that needs rules too, to protect solar access.
I have a thick nuisance cypress type tree next-door, but fortunately on the south side of my house, so it doesn’t block the sun. It hangs over my fence and continuously drops it’s leaves making a big mess, on the ground and the roof. My roof is a catchment area for my large water tank, so this is not good. I offered the neighbour to pay half the cost of removal of the tree, but the neighbour refused. I had some workmen in and all the branches hanging over the fence (2.5metres plus into my yard) cut off. The workmen took one look at the (not attractive) tree and asked why it wasn’t all cut down. I didn’t return the branches to the neighbour though to keep the peace, and also because the neighbour rents out the house and this would have inconvenienced the tenant more than the owner. I am thinking this exercise needs to be repeated again soon.

rosscoact 12:54 pm 20 Feb 15

As you have noticed the government is incapable of helping in these sort of disputes but you can use this to your advantage.

Assuming that your relationship with your neighbour is irretrievably broken down, just cut the hedge down from your side while your neighbour isn’t home. ACT government won’t intervene and it’s not worth anybody’s time and money to pursue civil action so you’re home and hosed.

If your relationship with the neighbour isn’t irretrievably broken down, it will be by the time this is ver.

beardedclam 12:22 pm 20 Feb 15

In reality, Its between you and your neighbour.
Hire a tree surgeon to trim all the hedge that is hanging over your fence.

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