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A new immigrant, asking for employment advice

By 1 December 2013 67

Greetings,

It’s very difficult to understand a country only by web browsing!

I’m a self educated graphic designer, planning for my settlement in CBR in near future. I’ve been granted a permanent work visa by the government.

Both being proud of having this golden opportunity to live and work in Australia -hopefully forever-, and concerned at the same time about wether my skills will be adequate for such an advanced, competitive job market, naturally I’m very concerned about how to position myself to get the right job.

About me:
Being active in various fields in design and print for many years, I can position myself as a graphic production person or a prepress tradesperson.

For the technically interested, I have experience working with the following software,code, OS’s and tools: Studio Visualiser, Lightroom, Dreamweaver, Indesign, Photoshop, Illustrator, Flash, HTML, ActionScript, MacOS and Linux. My portfolio is mostly consist of print jobs like magazines, package designs,posters , advertisements and branding / identity. I also do amateur street photography and landscape photography in my free time.

Although I’m a self educed person, (University dropout), my about 15 years of experience of working with design studios, prepress companies and various design and print clients gave me enough good reputation to be able to teach in design web design and technologies to B.A graduates in private institutes for about 5 years.

However, I know that sadly I can’t ship my work reputation overseas and I’m anxious to know wether local businesses will give me a chance to show what I can do, or I’ll be rejected outright due to lack of related academic education.

My questions are:

1-How should my general approach to job market should be? Posting on job sites and waiting is enough or there are more active ways of looking for job?

2-Is there a chance that I get basic job and modest salary that make ends meet (rent+other basic living expense+transport) within 2-3 months after my settlement finalised? Or I should prepare myself for a long period of unemployment and be very careful about my expenses?

3-Is it a possibility that a private institute accept me as a web design teacher in it’s very basic courses? (perhaps after I getting a certificate or passing some exams myself?)

It would be highly appreciated if you advise me how my approach should be. I’m willing to work with competitive salary, because I’m interested to learn the local business culture as soon as possible.

Thanks for your help in advance,

Émigré

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67 Responses to A new immigrant, asking for employment advice
#1
Pork Hunt10:20 pm, 01 Dec 13

“I’m a self educated graphic designer, planning for my settlement in CBR in near future.”
If you are responsible for CBR, eff off we’re full.
No, only joking, good luck.

#2
emigre12:39 am, 02 Dec 13

Pork Hunt said :

“I’m a self educated graphic designer, planning for my settlement in CBR in near future.”
If you are responsible for CBR, eff off we’re full.
No, only joking, good luck.

@Pork Hunt :

:) Indeed I should admit I like the CBR branding design, but think these things should flow from within communities over time and can’t be mandated by government from top.

BTW, two things I discovered that is interesting about the Australians so far are: 1- They can make fun of everything, and 2-Every product they sell has a waterproof version!

and I like them both :)

#3
DrKoresh1:30 am, 02 Dec 13

I reckon than most people don’t have a bloody clue when it comes to IT/web design, so as long as you can demonstrate that you do then it shouldn’t be too much of a problem to find employment. A lot of very talented IT people are self-taught.

#4
Ryoma7:38 am, 02 Dec 13

Hi Emigre,

Congratulations on being given a permanent work visa, and welcome to Canberra. In relation to the CBR comment below, it relates to this: http://www.brandcanberra.com.au/

I cannot speak directly about what it’s like to come to Canberra from overseas, but my wife has done so, and so on that basis, I think I can offer some (cautious) observations. I’ll try to answer your suggestions first:

1) By all means, posting upon job sites is OK, but it is not enough. If you have a look at this website more broadly, and other media sources, you’ll see that we have a new national government looking to cut spending. It is not entirely clear how much impact that will have, but as Canberra is the capital city, that means there are job losses happening, and this is having an impact upon general business confidence. This means that potential customers for your services may be hard to find for a while.

In terms of more active ways of looking for a job, I suggest you use Linked-In, and see if your existing network links through to people in the graphic design field in Australia. Making contact with people ahead of time will work better than trying it once you arrive in Canberra.

By the same token, get in contact with groups like Schmooze (Google it) and the ACT Chamber of Commerce. Both run networking events where you can meet local people from a wide range of backgrounds, and if will allow you to ask lots of questions.

2) I don’t know what the demand for graphic designers is like at present. One word of caution, though; while the ACT government has given you a visa, they are doing so upon feedback from local industry – and that feedback can of course be somewhat self-interested.

I would come to Canberra willing to work at anything – not only graphic design – and to save hard before getting here. The cost of living here is high in Australian terms because the presence of government wages tends to push the price of things higher, and because the city is not always big enough to offer much competition between businesses.

I’d plan for the possibility of it taking quite some time to establish yourself, and your reputation. Along those lines, I wonder if it may not be a good idea to look hard at the business sector in Canberra outside of government. Education is big here too, but as it is funded by government, I’m not sure how much need there is for your skill set.

Teaching people these skills by yourself could be lucrative, especially for the small businesses here, and if you are willing to work in a flexible manner as to location and timing.

Also, check out both of these websites: http://www.action.act.gov.au (public transport) and http://www.allhomes.com.au. It is helpful to have a car in Canberra, but if not, then living along one of the trunk bus routes or near Civic will help. The cost of housing is relatively high, but (thankfully) is starting to soften. One hint; don’t rent anywhere that’s too cheap; many of Canberra’s rental houses do not actually possess either heating or insulation, and in winter, you will need heating.

Finally, for a flavour of Canberra, check out some blogs, and keep reading the Riot Act website. You will soon see that the city’s people are diverse, progressive, and not shy about voicing their opinions (just read the comments!).

I wish you the best of luck!!! :D

#5
Robertson8:12 am, 02 Dec 13

Let’s hope you have better luck than my ex-housemate who spent 12 months fruitlessly applying for graphic design jobs before finally accepting a job in Fyshwick designing covers for porn videos…

#6
Deref8:36 am, 02 Dec 13

Can’t help you with the employment thing, but welcome to Oz and good luck.

#7
Postalgeek9:18 am, 02 Dec 13

Robertson said :

Let’s hope you have better luck than my ex-housemate who spent 12 months fruitlessly applying for graphic design jobs before finally accepting a job in Fyshwick designing covers for porn videos…

That would be an awkward portfolio to present to future employers…

#8
pink little birdie9:28 am, 02 Dec 13

I’d be looking at commercial printing and copying places. It’s entry into the field and you get the additional experience of printing designs (knowing whats do-able and what isn’t).

#9
Deref9:29 am, 02 Dec 13

Robertson said :

Let’s hope you have better luck than my ex-housemate who spent 12 months fruitlessly applying for graphic design jobs before finally accepting a job in Fyshwick designing covers for porn videos…

You say that like it’s a bad thing.

#10
Holden Caulfield9:38 am, 02 Dec 13

Give Design Emergency a call and arrange a meeting. If nothing else you’ll get a better understanding of what’s likely to be available and who you need to speak to.

http://www.design-emergency.com.au

#11
emigre10:22 pm, 02 Dec 13

DrKoresh said :

I reckon than most people don’t have a bloody clue when it comes to IT/web design, so as long as you can demonstrate that you do then it shouldn’t be too much of a problem to find employment. A lot of very talented IT people are self-taught.

Thanks for your kind advice!

#12
emigre11:00 pm, 02 Dec 13

Ryoma said :

Hi Emigre,

Congratulations on being given a permanent work visa, and welcome to Canberra. In relation to the CBR comment below, it relates to this: http://www.brandcanberra.com.au/

I cannot speak directly about what it’s like to come to Canberra from overseas, but my wife has done so, and so on that basis, I think I can offer some (cautious) observations. I’ll try to answer your suggestions first:

1) By all means, posting upon job sites is OK, but it is not enough. If you have a look at this website more broadly, and other media sources, you’ll see that we have a new national government looking to cut spending. It is not entirely clear how much impact that will have, but as Canberra is the capital city, that means there are job losses happening, and this is having an impact upon general business confidence. This means that potential customers for your services may be hard to find for a while.

In terms of more active ways of looking for a job, I suggest you use Linked-In, and see if your existing network links through to people in the graphic design field in Australia. Making contact with people ahead of time will work better than trying it once you arrive in Canberra.

By the same token, get in contact with groups like Schmooze (Google it) and the ACT Chamber of Commerce. Both run networking events where you can meet local people from a wide range of backgrounds, and if will allow you to ask lots of questions.

2) I don’t know what the demand for graphic designers is like at present. One word of caution, though; while the ACT government has given you a visa, they are doing so upon feedback from local industry – and that feedback can of course be somewhat self-interested.

I would come to Canberra willing to work at anything – not only graphic design – and to save hard before getting here. The cost of living here is high in Australian terms because the presence of government wages tends to push the price of things higher, and because the city is not always big enough to offer much competition between businesses.

I’d plan for the possibility of it taking quite some time to establish yourself, and your reputation. Along those lines, I wonder if it may not be a good idea to look hard at the business sector in Canberra outside of government. Education is big here too, but as it is funded by government, I’m not sure how much need there is for your skill set.

Teaching people these skills by yourself could be lucrative, especially for the small businesses here, and if you are willing to work in a flexible manner as to location and timing.

Also, check out both of these websites: http://www.action.act.gov.au (public transport) and http://www.allhomes.com.au. It is helpful to have a car in Canberra, but if not, then living along one of the trunk bus routes or near Civic will help. The cost of housing is relatively high, but (thankfully) is starting to soften. One hint; don’t rent anywhere that’s too cheap; many of Canberra’s rental houses do not actually possess either heating or insulation, and in winter, you will need heating.

Finally, for a flavour of Canberra, check out some blogs, and keep reading the Riot Act website. You will soon see that the city’s people are diverse, progressive, and not shy about voicing their opinions (just read the comments!).

I wish you the best of luck!!! :D

@Ryoma

Sir,

I’m very thankful of your detailed and useful advice. I saved it to go to each site and re-read it line by line later.

Being from an authoritarian country, and not coming to Australia for accumulating wealth, but to enjoy the political and social freedoms that I value the most, I don’t have high expectations when it comes to securing a job. So maybe -maybe- my expectation of job satisfaction differs vastly from the average RiotACT readers. i.e, what I would do, they won’t do, and it’s completely normal and fair, because it’s their country and they have history, relatives , connections and even perhaps accumulated wealth from past generations that helps them make better choices, I guess.

So, as long as a job is within my physical and mental strength and skills and of course legal, I’m ok with that. But I’m afraid being too timid and stick to the first job I’ve been offered, maybe is not a good strategy either, because maybe it will have a negative effect on my resume for future employers. This is something I need you and other kind reader’s advice on.

One thing that I, as someone who never lived in countries with western job culture (Specially US and UK) is afraid of, is the rumours of workplace being very disciplined, very difficult, even brutal, and slightest mistakes in strategy, tactic and technic will result to sever reactions from peers and supervisors and immediate layoff.

For your information, yours truly worked in business settings as a designer, prepress tradesperson for 15 years of so, working normally 9-5, many months without one day of leave, and many days working until 7-8PM. There were times that I stayed 24 hours in office non stop to meet a deadline. My coworkers mention I’m tidy, organised, polite and friendly. I’m tolerant of good jokes and tough criticism and help others when I can. I’m usually very law abiding and observe the rules of workplace carefully. While I’m kind to my coworkers and people under my supervision, I usually don’t get into cliques and cover other’s wrongdoings. In my workplace, people usually come to me when they have a problem with upper management and use me as their mediator. (our job culture perhaps is very different from us and maybe this paragraph made many readers rise their eyebrows, or maybe not?)

So, should I be afraid or my experiences I mentioned suffices for surviving in the Australian workplace?

The advice on home searching is very appreciated. Being an urban guy, my ideal home is low maintenance, ~40 sqrm studio, near city centre with access to public transport. I’m not interested in suburban, big houses. Also I don’t like cars, never owned one and prefer walking, biking and public transport. Unfortunately it seems I can’t find anything like this with an affordable rent in sophisticated civic and perhaps I’ll be forced to go to suburban borders of the city. Hope I find a good bus to workplace.

I will note your advice on home A/C and check it with my real estate agency.

Thanks again for all the kind advice and well wishes! It was really heart warming and encouraging for me.

Warm Regards,

émigré

#13
emigre11:06 pm, 02 Dec 13

Robertson said :

Let’s hope you have better luck than my ex-housemate who spent 12 months fruitlessly applying for graphic design jobs before finally accepting a job in Fyshwick designing covers for porn videos…

@Robertson

Thanks for the comment! Personally, I don’t think there’s anything wrong with working in porn industry if it’s done legally and ethically and with social responsibility in mind. But, I guess perhaps my resume will raise some eyebrows for future employers :) Specially it feels uncomfortable to work with lady co-workers afterwards, if they knew were I came from. Worse than that, imagine -heavens forbid- your porn job win a design award! You will be famous for all the wrong reasons ;)

#14
emigre11:08 pm, 02 Dec 13

Deref said :

Can’t help you with the employment thing, but welcome to Oz and good luck.

@Deref:

Thanks for your kind comment! Very hear warming :)

#15
emigre11:11 pm, 02 Dec 13

Postalgeek said :

Robertson said :

Let’s hope you have better luck than my ex-housemate who spent 12 months fruitlessly applying for graphic design jobs before finally accepting a job in Fyshwick designing covers for porn videos…

That would be an awkward portfolio to present to future employers…

@Postalgeek

Agree, I have no problem with job itself but I should bury my resume in a moonless night in the middle of desert afterwards ;)

#16
emigre11:17 pm, 02 Dec 13

pink little birdie said :

I’d be looking at commercial printing and copying places. It’s entry into the field and you get the additional experience of printing designs (knowing whats do-able and what isn’t).

@pink little birdie:

Thanks! Very wise advice! This way, first, I guess I won’t be under pressure to have complex and direct communications and negotiations with design clients – which is difficult even in my own native language after doing it for 15 years anyway- Also, if I have shortcoming in creativity, understanding cultural taste and local do’s and don’ts, at least I’m sure about my knowledge of software and tools and can work with more confidence. It’s a kind of two-way lower expectation between me and my employer.

#17
emigre11:19 pm, 02 Dec 13

Holden Caulfield said :

Give Design Emergency a call and arrange a meeting. If nothing else you’ll get a better understanding of what’s likely to be available and who you need to speak to.

http://www.design-emergency.com.au

@Holden Caulfield

Many thanks! very good advice! I will surly get in touch with them :)

#18
Ryoma11:01 am, 04 Dec 13

Hi Emigre

It’s not a problem to give advice, but everything I’ve said is merely my opinion; it doesn’t mean I’m always correct (Mrs Ryoma would definitely agree with that!).

I wouldn’t worry too much about making mistakes, as after all, if an employer is that ruthless, why would anyone wish to work for them? And if the whole Australian (or Canberran) culture was like that, well, who would wish to immigrate here? ;D

As for sticking to the first job you are offered, have a look at http://www.seek.com, and http://www.glassdoor.com to compare salaries, etc. But if you are willing to work hard at whatever you do, and to get to know people and things over time, then I wouldn’t worry about this to start with. One step at a time…

One thing you might wish to do is to get your current qualifications assessed by the ACT Government; http://www.communityservices.act.gov.au/multicultural/services/act_overseas_qualifications_unit_oqu

A lot of Australian employers feel more comfortable with local qualifications, simply because they are accustomed to them, and have a fair idea of the quality of skills connected to them. I’m not sure if they believe the ACT Government’s assessment, but it cannot hurt to bring such an assessment along to a job interview.

Emigre, I don’t need to know where you are from, but your English sounds a little bit formal, and you are very open with sharing information. That’s a great attitude to have when it comes to adapting to a new country, but I would be just a little bit more cautious with the information you share, especially over the Internet.

You could Google whether there is a migrant club or association for the culture you come from. That will, you will be able to talk to people who have been through the same experience you are starting, and they will be able to help explain how and why things work, and why some things are different or strange.

Canberra is quite multicultural, with people from many different countries, religions and beliefs living here. That doesn’t mean everyone gets along well all the time,it’s not paradise. And it can be hard to draw a line between what is rude or reasonable behaviour, because people’s perceptions of what is rude or not varies. My wife often gets annoyed at stuff that I think is fine, and vice-versa. But if you treat people with respect, that’s usually what you will get back.

Finally, you mentioned “sophisticated’ Civic. It’s not like that all the time (http://www.canberratimes.com.au/act-news/special-series–punch-drunk-part-two-civic-police-seek-boost-in-numbers-to-patrol-trouble-spots-20131202-2ymf4.html), and in winter, you will find it can get fairly quiet. Canberra is not a dense city, so there is not often the urban “buzz” that you might expect from cities of the same population overseas. But it is changing, and the city (generally speaking) is a beautiful place.

In terms of what else you said, a lot of how you will find out the “right answer” is going to be by trial and error.

#19
Holden Caulfield3:40 pm, 04 Dec 13

Focus Press just opened its new factory in Hume today. With plans to expand it may need design and/or pre-press staff.

#20
Watson3:56 pm, 04 Dec 13

(Sorry, I haven’t read the other replies yet.)

When I migrated here, I got started by going to employment agencies. I wasn’t fussy at all at first. I did a bit of data entry (don’t mind repetitive work), web stuff, library work, etc. Mostly short contracts, some ended up getting extended a few times. Until eventually I got a permanent job.

It’s a while ago now, but I signed up with a few agencies (including some very small ones that ended up giving me the most opportunities) and I hassled them regularly to ask if they had any work for me. I found it to be a fairly painless process, especially compared to how things worked in the European country I’d just come from, where there was and is a much higher level of unemployment and experience doesn’t count for anything unless you have 3 degrees.

#21
Sandman9:41 pm, 04 Dec 13

emigre said :

So, should I be afraid or my experiences I mentioned suffices for surviving in the Australian workplace?

Not sure where you heard your rumours but in my opinion they couldn’t be further from the truth. From your small sample of posts I can’t see you having any problems. You have the right attitude to enable you to progress and be a valuable employee. Don’t be afraid to start low down, and you’ll progress quickly. So many people in this town just coast along in their jobs with minimum productivity.

I’ve always gone into new jobs with that slight fear of “can I do it”, “will I be good enough”. In the end I’ve never lasted more than 3 years at a job for the opposite reason. I get to a point where the only thing challenging me is the continued incompetence of workmates and higher ups. Eventually I started working for myself, so that the only person that can disappoint me is myself.

#22
ausbradr12:45 pm, 06 Dec 13

Hi Émigré,

I’ve recently moved here from Sydney and had the same issue you’ll have, of finding work, so I might be able to help you out with your questions.

1. Apply Apply Apply! I like http://www.seek.com.au to apply for jobs.

2. Come here with about 40-50k in your pocket. You’ll need that to make ends meet, in case you don’t find work for a while. It took me 5 months to find work, others have taken longer. This town will send you broke in the meantime. You’ll be alright once you find work though. You may have to take up temp work or head to Sydney to work temp jobs, as I have had to.

3. Pass

#23
Gungahlin Al2:48 pm, 06 Dec 13

Emigre, if you are on some form of government income support, and would consider making a business of it yourself, then you may be eligible for the New Enterprise Incentive Scheme:
http://employment.gov.au/neis

If so, contact details for the local providers you’d need to speak with are at:
http://www.jobsearch.gov.au/provider/NEIS.aspx#act

#24
farnarkler8:36 pm, 06 Dec 13

If what the government is correct about regional Australia needing more people, you should have been made to go and live in Wagga or Mildura or somewhere regional for a few years before heading to the cities. I’m sure there are opportunities for your skills outside of the larger cities.

#25
emigre1:14 am, 07 Dec 13

Ryoma said :

Hi Emigre

It’s not a problem to give advice, but everything I’ve said is merely my opinion; it doesn’t mean I’m always correct (Mrs Ryoma would definitely agree with that!).

I wouldn’t worry too much about making mistakes, as after all, if an employer is that ruthless, why would anyone wish to work for them? And if the whole Australian (or Canberran) culture was like that, well, who would wish to immigrate here? ;D

As for sticking to the first job you are offered, have a look at http://www.seek.com, and http://www.glassdoor.com to compare salaries, etc. But if you are willing to work hard at whatever you do, and to get to know people and things over time, then I wouldn’t worry about this to start with. One step at a time…

One thing you might wish to do is to get your current qualifications assessed by the ACT Government; http://www.communityservices.act.gov.au/multicultural/services/act_overseas_qualifications_unit_oqu

A lot of Australian employers feel more comfortable with local qualifications, simply because they are accustomed to them, and have a fair idea of the quality of skills connected to them. I’m not sure if they believe the ACT Government’s assessment, but it cannot hurt to bring such an assessment along to a job interview.

Emigre, I don’t need to know where you are from, but your English sounds a little bit formal, and you are very open with sharing information. That’s a great attitude to have when it comes to adapting to a new country, but I would be just a little bit more cautious with the information you share, especially over the Internet.

You could Google whether there is a migrant club or association for the culture you come from. That will, you will be able to talk to people who have been through the same experience you are starting, and they will be able to help explain how and why things work, and why some things are different or strange.

Canberra is quite multicultural, with people from many different countries, religions and beliefs living here. That doesn’t mean everyone gets along well all the time,it’s not paradise. And it can be hard to draw a line between what is rude or reasonable behaviour, because people’s perceptions of what is rude or not varies. My wife often gets annoyed at stuff that I think is fine, and vice-versa. But if you treat people with respect, that’s usually what you will get back.

Finally, you mentioned “sophisticated’ Civic. It’s not like that all the time (http://www.canberratimes.com.au/act-news/special-series–punch-drunk-part-two-civic-police-seek-boost-in-numbers-to-patrol-trouble-spots-20131202-2ymf4.html), and in winter, you will find it can get fairly quiet. Canberra is not a dense city, so there is not often the urban “buzz” that you might expect from cities of the same population overseas. But it is changing, and the city (generally speaking) is a beautiful place.

In terms of what else you said, a lot of how you will find out the “right answer” is going to be by trial and error.

@Ryoma:

Dear Ryoma,

Thanks for the insightful comments. You brought up a very interesting matter by mentioning qualification assessment. Indeed I already have the positive TRA assessment and it’s the basis of my immigration case being accepted. Of course, as you mentioned, maybe an employer doesn’t care what TRA thinks about my skills. Also, the TRA itself states that their recommendation does not guarantee anything about securing job, and it’s just for immigration legal paperworks.

In addition to TRA, which is “trade” oriented, I’m very interested in being assessed in graphic design field. I did a quick search on google and found that Canberra Institute of Technology provides prior learning assessment programs and contacted them so they guid me how to prepare my resume and portfolio for assessment. It’s been a month or so that I’ve contacted them but unfortunately I haven’t heard from them yet.

About my English, being too formal, yes, I’m sorry, I’ve learned English mostly by myself and by reading books, listening to podcasts, business letter writings, technical readings, magazines and newspapers. Indeed-because of the very limited communication possibilities in my country of origin with the world outside-I think the number of native English speakers I’ve talked to in my entire lifetime are not more than 10! So yes, I agree I sound very businesslike and robotic. FYI, in my country of origin (Iran), there’s only state TV, satellite TV is illegal, foreign press is non existent, local press is mostly state run and heavily censored, Internet is heavily filtered and you can’t view most major web sites like YouTube, FaceBook, most major world news networks , etc. People find ways to circumvent these but generally here is very isolated and keeping yourself up to date is very difficult.

About your advice on privacy, OK, Ill tray to be more careful! Thanks for letting me know.

I really enjoyed the dialogue with you and other very friendly readers.

Warm Regard,
Emigre

#26
emigre1:17 am, 07 Dec 13

Holden Caulfield said :

Focus Press just opened its new factory in Hume today. With plans to expand it may need design and/or pre-press staff.

@Holden Caulfield:

Thanks for letting me know.

#27
emigre1:23 am, 07 Dec 13

Watson said :

(Sorry, I haven’t read the other replies yet.)

When I migrated here, I got started by going to employment agencies. I wasn’t fussy at all at first. I did a bit of data entry (don’t mind repetitive work), web stuff, library work, etc. Mostly short contracts, some ended up getting extended a few times. Until eventually I got a permanent job.

It’s a while ago now, but I signed up with a few agencies (including some very small ones that ended up giving me the most opportunities) and I hassled them regularly to ask if they had any work for me. I found it to be a fairly painless process, especially compared to how things worked in the European country I’d just come from, where there was and is a much higher level of unemployment and experience doesn’t count for anything unless you have 3 degrees.

@Watson:

Thanks for your advice. It was very useful for me because I’m coming from a place where temp jobs are not common and viewed very negatively. It seems I should forget about full-time permanent jobs at the beginning and try to enter the job market as soon as I find anything. Then I will learn the market and culture and perhaps I can gradually upgrade.

#28
emigre1:25 am, 07 Dec 13

Sandman said :

emigre said :

So, should I be afraid or my experiences I mentioned suffices for surviving in the Australian workplace?

Not sure where you heard your rumours but in my opinion they couldn’t be further from the truth. From your small sample of posts I can’t see you having any problems. You have the right attitude to enable you to progress and be a valuable employee. Don’t be afraid to start low down, and you’ll progress quickly. So many people in this town just coast along in their jobs with minimum productivity.

I’ve always gone into new jobs with that slight fear of “can I do it”, “will I be good enough”. In the end I’ve never lasted more than 3 years at a job for the opposite reason. I get to a point where the only thing challenging me is the continued incompetence of workmates and higher ups. Eventually I started working for myself, so that the only person that can disappoint me is myself.

@Sandman:

Thanks for the encouraging words! It’s very assuring and uplifting!

#29
emigre1:33 am, 07 Dec 13

ausbradr said :

Hi Émigré,

I’ve recently moved here from Sydney and had the same issue you’ll have, of finding work, so I might be able to help you out with your questions.

1. Apply Apply Apply! I like http://www.seek.com.au to apply for jobs.

2. Come here with about 40-50k in your pocket. You’ll need that to make ends meet, in case you don’t find work for a while. It took me 5 months to find work, others have taken longer. This town will send you broke in the meantime. You’ll be alright once you find work though. You may have to take up temp work or head to Sydney to work temp jobs, as I have had to.

3. Pass

@ausbradr:

Thanks for the alarming (!) advice. I’ll try to bring cash as much as I can and try to live a very modest life to sustain unemployment period. Do you know how much is the minimum /week rent for a 40sqr/m studio? Also, are there serious disturbing consequences (e.g. street noise, security, unfriendly neighbours) if I go ahead and choose a very cheap place? In other words, is there any place in Canberra that considered “Bad”? (I personally don’t think so!)

#30
emigre1:45 am, 07 Dec 13

Gungahlin Al said :

Emigre, if you are on some form of government income support, and would consider making a business of it yourself, then you may be eligible for the New Enterprise Incentive Scheme:
http://employment.gov.au/neis

If so, contact details for the local providers you’d need to speak with are at:
http://www.jobsearch.gov.au/provider/NEIS.aspx#act

@Gungahlin Al:

Thanks for your advice. Very interesting. I checked and I’m eligible in theory. I’m not on any government income support. But I don’t know about the local market needs and I need to study wether me and my skills are it to contribute and really fill a gap in services provided in city.

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