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283,162 voters enrolled for ACT election

By Charlotte Harper - 20 September 2016 17

Ballot box. Photo: iStock

There are 26,460 more ACT residents enrolled to vote at this year’s ACT Legislative Assembly election than there were for the last election in 2012.

The electoral rolls for the October 15 election closed on Friday.

“There are 283,162 electors on the roll for this election – an increase of 26,460 on the 256,702 who were enrolled for the last election in 2012,” the ACT Electoral Commissioner, Mr Phillip Green, said today, updating an earlier figure he had quoted that incorrectly included 16 and 17 year olds who were provisionally enrolled but who would not be 18 years old on or before polling day, and therefore who are not eligible to vote at the 2016 election.

“In 2016, 145,145 females, 137,992 males and 25 electors with unspecified gender will be eligible to vote,” Mr Green said.

Here is the breakdown of enrolments for the five ACT electorates:

 

Electorate

 

Number enrolled
Brindabella 53,614
Ginninderra 54,585
Kurrajong 59,010
Murrumbidgee 57,058
Yerrabi 58,895
Total 283,162

 

Enrolments for the 9 ACT Legislative Assembly elections:

 

Election year  

Number enrolled

 

1989 169,493
1992 184,405
1995 196,959
1998 205,248
2001 218,615
2004 226,098
2008 243,471
2012 256,702
2016 283,162

What’s Your opinion?


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17 Responses to
283,162 voters enrolled for ACT election
1
gooterz 1:45 am
15 Oct 16
#

30% pre polled.

2
dungfungus 8:30 am
16 Oct 16
#

Anyone know how many informal votes?

3
dungfungus 8:15 am
17 Oct 16
#

The electoral commissioner has now stated that 10% of electors did not vote – he thinks that is a good result – but we still don’t know how many of the 90% that did turn up voted informal nor do we know how many of the votes were declared informal.

There is some suggestion that any vote that wasn’t numbered to the end is an informal vote.

4
gooterz 9:33 am
17 Oct 16
#

dungfungus said :

The electoral commissioner has now stated that 10% of electors did not vote – he thinks that is a good result – but we still don’t know how many of the 90% that did turn up voted informal nor do we know how many of the votes were declared informal.

There is some suggestion that any vote that wasn’t numbered to the end is an informal vote.

Wouldn’t postal votes still be coming in?
Hopefully they fine the 10%

5
dungfungus 9:38 am
17 Oct 16
#

gooterz said :

dungfungus said :

The electoral commissioner has now stated that 10% of electors did not vote – he thinks that is a good result – but we still don’t know how many of the 90% that did turn up voted informal nor do we know how many of the votes were declared informal.

There is some suggestion that any vote that wasn’t numbered to the end is an informal vote.

Wouldn’t postal votes still be coming in?
Hopefully they fine the 10%

I understand that postal votes are requested well before the election so the would be included within the 90%.

6
dungfungus 9:45 am
17 Oct 16
#

dungfungus said :

gooterz said :

dungfungus said :

The electoral commissioner has now stated that 10% of electors did not vote – he thinks that is a good result – but we still don’t know how many of the 90% that did turn up voted informal nor do we know how many of the votes were declared informal.

There is some suggestion that any vote that wasn’t numbered to the end is an informal vote.

Wouldn’t postal votes still be coming in?
Hopefully they fine the 10%

I understand that postal votes are requested well before the election so the would be included within the 90%.

Regarding the fining of the ones that made no attempt to vote, I thinkthis isn’t pursued much these days; you know, it’s a “victim-less crime” or something like that.

I knew a guy who used to serve the summonses on the non-voters – he said there were thousands of them in Canberra.

Does anyone know if residents at AMC are allowed to vote?

7
JC 9:49 am
17 Oct 16
#

dungfungus said :

The electoral commissioner has now stated that 10% of electors did not vote – he thinks that is a good result – but we still don’t know how many of the 90% that did turn up voted informal nor do we know how many of the votes were declared informal.

There is some suggestion that any vote that wasn’t numbered to the end is an informal vote.

Suggest you go to the act elections website and look sat the stats they have on the votes including informals.

And you are wrong about votes not being number to the end being declared informal. The way it works is votes are counted until you stop numbering. After that the vote is counted as extinguished not informal. Again the detailed stats for each electorate shows the number of extinsguished votes at each stage of the count.

8
dungfungus 12:29 pm
17 Oct 16
#

JC said :

dungfungus said :

The electoral commissioner has now stated that 10% of electors did not vote – he thinks that is a good result – but we still don’t know how many of the 90% that did turn up voted informal nor do we know how many of the votes were declared informal.

There is some suggestion that any vote that wasn’t numbered to the end is an informal vote.

Suggest you go to the act elections website and look sat the stats they have on the votes including informals.

And you are wrong about votes not being number to the end being declared informal. The way it works is votes are counted until you stop numbering. After that the vote is counted as extinguished not informal. Again the detailed stats for each electorate shows the number of extinsguished votes at each stage of the count.

I am not “wrong” – I simply said there had been suggestions (signs by the side of the roads to be exact) that every ballot paper had to be numbered to the end.
You have confirmed that is not the case, thanks.

9
JC 9:20 pm
17 Oct 16
#

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

The electoral commissioner has now stated that 10% of electors did not vote – he thinks that is a good result – but we still don’t know how many of the 90% that did turn up voted informal nor do we know how many of the votes were declared informal.

There is some suggestion that any vote that wasn’t numbered to the end is an informal vote.

Suggest you go to the act elections website and look sat the stats they have on the votes including informals.

And you are wrong about votes not being number to the end being declared informal. The way it works is votes are counted until you stop numbering. After that the vote is counted as extinguished not informal. Again the detailed stats for each electorate shows the number of extinsguished votes at each stage of the count.

I am not “wrong” – I simply said there had been suggestions (signs by the side of the roads to be exact) that every ballot paper had to be numbered to the end.
You have confirmed that is not the case, thanks.

And before someone corrects me the correct term for a vote that has come to the end of numbering is exhausted not extinguished.

10
JC 9:22 pm
17 Oct 16
#

gooterz said :

dungfungus said :

The electoral commissioner has now stated that 10% of electors did not vote – he thinks that is a good result – but we still don’t know how many of the 90% that did turn up voted informal nor do we know how many of the votes were declared informal.

There is some suggestion that any vote that wasn’t numbered to the end is an informal vote.

Wouldn’t postal votes still be coming in?
Hopefully they fine the 10%

They know how many postal ballots they sent out which is all that is required for that voter to have been marked as votes. Though not sure if they are included in the 90% turnout stat.

11
dungfungus 9:30 am
18 Oct 16
#

Something a bit weird here.

The number of electors enrolled increase by 27,000 odd in the last 4 years but the chief minister tells us the Territory population is increasing by 5,000 a year which is 20,000 for the same period and a lot of these would be under 18.
So, where did the extra 7,000 eligible voters come from?

12
John Moulis 12:18 pm
18 Oct 16
#

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

The electoral commissioner has now stated that 10% of electors did not vote – he thinks that is a good result – but we still don’t know how many of the 90% that did turn up voted informal nor do we know how many of the votes were declared informal.

There is some suggestion that any vote that wasn’t numbered to the end is an informal vote.

Suggest you go to the act elections website and look sat the stats they have on the votes including informals.

And you are wrong about votes not being number to the end being declared informal. The way it works is votes are counted until you stop numbering. After that the vote is counted as extinguished not informal. Again the detailed stats for each electorate shows the number of extinsguished votes at each stage of the count.

I am not “wrong” – I simply said there had been suggestions (signs by the side of the roads to be exact) that every ballot paper had to be numbered to the end.
You have confirmed that is not the case, thanks.

And before someone corrects me the correct term for a vote that has come to the end of numbering is exhausted not extinguished.

At the Melrose High booth I was told by the officer to only number five squares. On the ballot paper itself it said the same thing. So could someone please explain those mysterious black and white signs along Athllon Drive saying to number every square? What were they all about and who was behind them? They seemed to be placed by the Libs or else a Lib front because another sign in the same black and white format said to put Labor and the Greens last. So who put them up and where did they get the impression that numbering every square would somehow favour the Libs?

13
dungfungus 12:36 pm
18 Oct 16
#

John Moulis said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

The electoral commissioner has now stated that 10% of electors did not vote – he thinks that is a good result – but we still don’t know how many of the 90% that did turn up voted informal nor do we know how many of the votes were declared informal.

There is some suggestion that any vote that wasn’t numbered to the end is an informal vote.

Suggest you go to the act elections website and look sat the stats they have on the votes including informals.

And you are wrong about votes not being number to the end being declared informal. The way it works is votes are counted until you stop numbering. After that the vote is counted as extinguished not informal. Again the detailed stats for each electorate shows the number of extinsguished votes at each stage of the count.

I am not “wrong” – I simply said there had been suggestions (signs by the side of the roads to be exact) that every ballot paper had to be numbered to the end.
You have confirmed that is not the case, thanks.

And before someone corrects me the correct term for a vote that has come to the end of numbering is exhausted not extinguished.

At the Melrose High booth I was told by the officer to only number five squares. On the ballot paper itself it said the same thing. So could someone please explain those mysterious black and white signs along Athllon Drive saying to number every square? What were they all about and who was behind them? They seemed to be placed by the Libs or else a Lib front because another sign in the same black and white format said to put Labor and the Greens last. So who put them up and where did they get the impression that numbering every square would somehow favour the Libs?

Probably placed there by Medicare.

14
JC 1:02 pm
18 Oct 16
#

John Moulis said :

At the Melrose High booth I was told by the officer to only number five squares. On the ballot paper itself it said the same thing. So could someone please explain those mysterious black and white signs along Athllon Drive saying to number every square? What were they all about and who was behind them? They seemed to be placed by the Libs or else a Lib front because another sign in the same black and white format said to put Labor and the Greens last. So who put them up and where did they get the impression that numbering every square would somehow favour the Libs?

The ballot paper said to number at LEAST 5 boxes, well the Yerrabi one did.

15
Maya123 1:15 pm
18 Oct 16
#

John Moulis said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

The electoral commissioner has now stated that 10% of electors did not vote – he thinks that is a good result – but we still don’t know how many of the 90% that did turn up voted informal nor do we know how many of the votes were declared informal.

There is some suggestion that any vote that wasn’t numbered to the end is an informal vote.

Suggest you go to the act elections website and look sat the stats they have on the votes including informals.

And you are wrong about votes not being number to the end being declared informal. The way it works is votes are counted until you stop numbering. After that the vote is counted as extinguished not informal. Again the detailed stats for each electorate shows the number of extinsguished votes at each stage of the count.

I am not “wrong” – I simply said there had been suggestions (signs by the side of the roads to be exact) that every ballot paper had to be numbered to the end.
You have confirmed that is not the case, thanks.

And before someone corrects me the correct term for a vote that has come to the end of numbering is exhausted not extinguished.

At the Melrose High booth I was told by the officer to only number five squares. On the ballot paper itself it said the same thing. So could someone please explain those mysterious black and white signs along Athllon Drive saying to number every square? What were they all about and who was behind them? They seemed to be placed by the Libs or else a Lib front because another sign in the same black and white format said to put Labor and the Greens last. So who put them up and where did they get the impression that numbering every square would somehow favour the Libs?

The instructions I read was to number a minimum of five boxes; after that it was up to you to number as many as you wanted to. Your choice. I stopped at eight, as I had forgotten my reading glasses and was struggling to read the paper. I received two instruction booklets before the election; one in my letter box and the other with the CT. Didn’t you get an instruction booklet too? Plus, the information was available elsewhere.
http://www.elections.act.gov.au/elections_and_voting/formality_of_ballot_papers

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