A sane water plan?

johnboy 27 March 2007 32

The Canberra Times is reporting that the colourful Kevin Cox has popped up with a scheme to let people pay through the nose to consume large amounts of water and give a portion of that money to those who conserve.

Heavy users would then pay almost twice the price for their water.

But households that use less than the sustainable level would be rewarded according to the amount of water they had saved.

Dr Cox expects people to opt-in to the system for both selfish and altruistic reasons.

“I think that people would be willing to pay more if they could put up a sign on their lawn saying, ‘we’re a Water Rewards member, don’t bug us about our green lawn’,” he said.

Better late than never.


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cscoxk cscoxk 8:59 am 08 Apr 07

Thanks for the positive comments on Water Rewards. There are still some misunderstandings but most people seem to get it. Water Rewards is a voluntary system, and it will be a not for profit and we hope ultimately owned and controlled by people who join. It would be of great assistance if you could give your feedback so we can improve it. Go to http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.asp?u=799553573429

VYBerlinaV8 now_with_added grunt VYBerlinaV8 now_with_added grunt 2:43 pm 29 Mar 07

Which is, of course, completely different to auto insurers who discriminate/differentiate based on age, gender, location, driving history and vehicle type.

Ralph Ralph 2:10 pm 29 Mar 07

I have often wondered why health insurance doesn’t offer no-claim or low-claim bonuses like car insurance.

I think this is because there is some ridiculous law that prevents health insurance companies from discriminating/differentiating customers.

VYBerlinaV8 now_with_added grunt VYBerlinaV8 now_with_added grunt 1:40 pm 29 Mar 07

“why stop with this sort of system for water? Lets use it for education, health, electricity.

I have no kids and i keep fit so i haven’t seen the inside of a hospital in 15 years. Where is my check? “

I have often wondered why health insurance doesn’t offer no-claim or low-claim bonuses like car insurance.

johnboy johnboy 10:30 pm 27 Mar 07

The article was clearing referring to bonds in the water infrastructure to be paid for by the heavy water users and distributed to the water efficient.

They might have to hold onto them until they mature but it’s still a huge chunk of cash and about as socially progressive a levy on consumption as it is possible to imagine.

Note: If you do not know what a bond is then look it up before commenting please.

bigred bigred 10:00 pm 27 Mar 07

It is people like Kev who got us into the GDE imbroglio. Alarm bells should be going off about anything he proposes.

Hugo Hugo 8:40 pm 27 Mar 07

Fungibility? Why do I have this sinking feeling (pun intended) that the economists have found themselves a new playground – our environment?

Pandy Pandy 7:35 pm 27 Mar 07

VY you are NOT allowed to water your lawn with a hose.

AS for Kev, he is a nutter.

caf caf 4:23 pm 27 Mar 07

Mmm, but water rights are fungible because one “1000 litres water right” is just as good as another “1000 litres water right” (or two “500 litres water right”), not because you can sell them. I understand you were simplifying but I think you might have simplified it a bit far 🙂

Ralph Ralph 3:27 pm 27 Mar 07

Well bugalugs, I take it from your tone that you will be standing (again) as an independent at the next ACT election?

Come on then, spit out your wonderous alternative proposals (as opposed to fence sitting and firing off pot shots).

Jazz Jazz 3:13 pm 27 Mar 07

I was referring to selling the rights to the water. the commodity itself is still the same. perhaps i didnt make that clear.

caf caf 2:48 pm 27 Mar 07

Jazz: not quite, fungibility means that one example of the commodity can be substituted for another (eg crude oil is the canonical example of a fungible commodity, because one barrel is exchangeable for another).

The concept you describe sounds more like tradeability.

bugalugs bugalugs 2:44 pm 27 Mar 07

This just all sounds so manageable to me.

Any most here complain about the inept current government

johnboy johnboy 2:36 pm 27 Mar 07

well what you save with your gray water (funded perhaps by this scheme) can go towards building your super with water bonds paid for by the high users.

Kramer Kramer 2:27 pm 27 Mar 07

Even if we do look at this sort of solution, we should still encourage the use of grey water on gardens, and other water saving measures (which we currently enforce through water restrictions).

Kramer Kramer 2:25 pm 27 Mar 07

It sounds like a good idea although water should be allocated to households on a per capita basis. This would give families a fair deal compared to singles who may waste their share on long showers or expansive lawns.

futto futto 1:18 pm 27 Mar 07

why stop with this sort of system for water? Lets use it for education, health, electricity.

I have no kids and i keep fit so i haven’t seen the inside of a hospital in 15 years. Where is my check?

VYBerlinaV8 now_with_added grunt VYBerlinaV8 now_with_added grunt 12:46 pm 27 Mar 07

My neighbours think I have some elaborate water collection and distribution system to keep my lawn green.

Actually they’re right, I have Googong Dam, pipes, pumps, a tap and a garden hose.

Ralph Ralph 12:26 pm 27 Mar 07

Same here, and placate my neighbours who are continually having conniptions when I water my lawn now.

VYBerlinaV8 now_with_added grunt VYBerlinaV8 now_with_added grunt 12:22 pm 27 Mar 07

None of this is going to help until we get a handle on businesses that use water.

If water was to cost a few bucks a month I’d just pay it so I can have a green lawn.

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