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AMA vs nurse walk-in clinics

By emd 16 January 2009 27

ABC Online reports that the ACT Branch of the Australian Nursing Federation are concerned that the AMA are trying to undermine public confidence in nurses in an effort to get us to avoid nurse walk-in clinics.

The possibility of nurse walk-in clinics has been raised already by Katy Gallagher, as a way of easing the strain on our busy hospital emergency wards and difficulties getting appointments with GPs.

What do you think? Would you be happy to use a nurse walk-in clinic for some things?

What’s Your opinion?


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AMA vs nurse walk-in clinics
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sepi 11:24 am 18 Jan 09

There are scads of nurses working in the public service too – conditions for nurses are not much good, so it is no wonder they don’t stick around in hospital jobs.

peter@home 12:40 am 18 Jan 09

Igglepiggle said :

johnboy said :

There are very few problems in the health system that can’t be laid at the feet of the AMA’s greed.

Not only is the current doctor shortage the result of their efforts to keep the market for their services tight, but now we’re plundering the third world for trained personnel to make up our short falls.

For mine they’ve discredited themselves for a generation.

Actually the current doctor shortage is due to government restrictions on medical school numbers throughout the 1980s. They did all the modelling assuming that all doctors were still old blokes with wives at home to manage their kids and were prepared to wrk 120 hours every week and always on call. Seeing as the gender ratios have been equal since the 70s and no Gen X doctor is prepared to work that way, the modelling was way out. 2001 was the smallest number of graduating doctors in Australia for 40 years. Thats why theres a shortage. The AMA tried to dispute the reduction in numbers at the time (unsuccessfully).

that is a part of it. the numbers of skilled migrant doctors who cannot get accreditation and end up working in other fields is staggering. there has been a couple of cases where regional communities have asked for doctors, and have found one of these migrants working in a fruit picking role, or other unskilled labor, only recognising their medical quals through an accident. These migrants cannot practice medicine in australia, and, if caught unaccredited, can be deported.

bit of a slap in the face of every regional community crying out for a doctor, relying on overworked nurses, who are performing serious triage as there isn’t anyone else to do it…..

maybe the AMA could work on getting help from any quarter, getting it from the nurses who do a stellar job already isn’t so bad.

miz 11:15 am 17 Jan 09

Nurses do all the work anyway!

I’ve noticed that these days, more doctors than not don’t like to actually touch patients! You have to actually say, ‘can you listen to his chest?’ for them to do this. And instead of looking at symptoms themselves, they want path tests.

While registered nurses are great, there is a shortage of these also, and we are now finding that enrolled (significantly less qualified) nurses are filling the gaps in hospitals. When my elderly dad was at Woden hosp a coupla years ago, we found glaring probs with this – his ward seemed to be mainly looked after by enrolled nurses and the reg nurse seemed always tied up in admin. Broken ankle, right, but he had to try and stay on the ball as he nearly got the wrong meds on more than one occasion, and they didn’t know how to manage his bandaging properly. Next thing, golden staph. Not a good experience.

Quokka 11:12 pm 16 Jan 09

Nurse clinics in general sound to me like a good idea. Anything that makes community health services more readily available, particularly with our relative shortage of GP’s in the ACT. As for taking the strain off the Emergency Department, the biggest problem is patients who need to be admitted to a bed on a ward somewhere.

The problem in ED is not lack of ED staff, it’s lack of throughput to move patients to other areas of the hospital… even doubling the number of staff wouldn’t help in the slightest if every bed in the place was already occupied!

sepi 8:49 pm 16 Jan 09

It will be even more interesting when Gen Y starts working as medicos. I can’t see them sticking out long hospital hours either.

Igglepiggle 7:58 pm 16 Jan 09

johnboy said :

There are very few problems in the health system that can’t be laid at the feet of the AMA’s greed.

Not only is the current doctor shortage the result of their efforts to keep the market for their services tight, but now we’re plundering the third world for trained personnel to make up our short falls.

For mine they’ve discredited themselves for a generation.

Actually the current doctor shortage is due to government restrictions on medical school numbers throughout the 1980s. They did all the modelling assuming that all doctors were still old blokes with wives at home to manage their kids and were prepared to wrk 120 hours every week and always on call. Seeing as the gender ratios have been equal since the 70s and no Gen X doctor is prepared to work that way, the modelling was way out. 2001 was the smallest number of graduating doctors in Australia for 40 years. Thats why theres a shortage. The AMA tried to dispute the reduction in numbers at the time (unsuccessfully).

peterh 4:59 pm 16 Jan 09

Whatsup said :

Nurses are more than qualified to deal with many things. The ANA is just a union trying to protect its members jobs. The health system is broken and needs a different approach, this might just be a successful solution.

I think that they are also concerned with the prevalence of great service from a nursing outfit, it would make GP’s look bad. the AMA wants the world to believe that the doctors that they have are the best, even when they are specialists like anesthesiologists – which currently has a shortage in canberra.

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