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Beyond the expected

Blood to flow at the Canberra Times, but we are hiring!

By johnboy - 18 June 2012 88

Crikey is explaining the cuts to Fairfax announced this morning which will impact the Canberra Times:

In the bombshell announcement delivered via a technically-plagued internal staff webcast this morning, CEO Greg Hywood said 20% of the cuts would come from editorial, 20% from printing and the remainder from other activities.

The media giant currently employs 800 metropolitan journalists across The Age, The Herald, The Canberra Times and its Brisbane and Perth web portals.

Apparently the cuts are around half of the editorial staff.

Here in the Eagle’s Nest we can’t see incoming Fairfax owner Gina Rineheart being happy about a paywall reducing her influence (she’s not buying it for profits). But an editorial cleanout would please her greatly we imagine.

We quite like Wil Anderson’s tweet:

RiotACT on the other hand is looking to staff up so any journalists out there who enjoy working hard should send their CV in to root@the-riotact.com . (Journalists who faff about all week and crap out 300 word stories ripped from un-named websites need not apply, you know who you are)

What’s Your opinion?


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88 Responses to
Blood to flow at the Canberra Times, but we are hiring!
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VYBerlinaV8_is_back 1:20 pm 21 Jun 12

Jungle Jim said :

VYBerlinaV8_is_back said :

c_c said :

The RiotACT was selected for archiving, a snapshot taken on a single day back in 2001.
Pandora has the site listed as not being re-archived. That snapshot is it, despite all that has happened since in ten years.

Don’t fret, because my favourite RiotACT story ever has been archived:

http://web.archive.org/web/20080731123539/http://the-riotact.com/?p=6663

A nice, albeit easy, wind up there! Obviously from a magical time when comment moderation wasn’t in effect…

They were crazy times, and a lot of fun.

Jungle Jim 11:53 am 21 Jun 12

VYBerlinaV8_is_back said :

c_c said :

The RiotACT was selected for archiving, a snapshot taken on a single day back in 2001.
Pandora has the site listed as not being re-archived. That snapshot is it, despite all that has happened since in ten years.

Don’t fret, because my favourite RiotACT story ever has been archived:

http://web.archive.org/web/20080731123539/http://the-riotact.com/?p=6663

A nice, albeit easy, wind up there! Obviously from a magical time when comment moderation wasn’t in effect…

Mysteryman 11:53 am 21 Jun 12

Jim Jones said :

Mysteryman said :

Jim Jones said :

I’m sitting next to an archivist now – there are actually tears rolling down her face, I shit you not.

Thanks for the entertainment.

For God’s sake, man, have a shower and use some deodorant. The onion-like effect from the stench of your unjustified smugness is clearly getting to her.

What an awesome comment – you’re bringing such perspicacity and insight into the debate. I kneel before your obviously superior wisdom and wit.

It’s not a debate when you ignore your opponent’s argument and instead choose to fabricate one on their behalf that suits your position/arrogance.

“Once the newspapers are gone, archivists won’t know where to get information from.”

Only someone with reading comprehension difficulties could draw that inference from what was posted. That, or someone who doesn’t have a solid argument.

Jim Jones 11:14 am 21 Jun 12

Mysteryman said :

Jim Jones said :

I’m sitting next to an archivist now – there are actually tears rolling down her face, I shit you not.

Thanks for the entertainment.

For God’s sake, man, have a shower and use some deodorant. The onion-like effect from the stench of your unjustified smugness is clearly getting to her.

What an awesome comment – you’re bringing such perspicacity and insight into the debate. I kneel before your obviously superior wisdom and wit.

VYBerlinaV8_is_back 11:13 am 21 Jun 12

c_c said :

The RiotACT was selected for archiving, a snapshot taken on a single day back in 2001.
Pandora has the site listed as not being re-archived. That snapshot is it, despite all that has happened since in ten years.

Don’t fret, because my favourite RiotACT story ever has been archived:

http://web.archive.org/web/20080731123539/http://the-riotact.com/?p=6663

Mysteryman 11:01 am 21 Jun 12

Jim Jones said :

I’m sitting next to an archivist now – there are actually tears rolling down her face, I shit you not.

Thanks for the entertainment.

For God’s sake, man, have a shower and use some deodorant. The onion-like effect from the stench of your unjustified smugness is clearly getting to her.

Jim Jones 9:52 am 21 Jun 12

I’m sitting next to an archivist now – there are actually tears rolling down her face, I shit you not.

Thanks for the entertainment.

Jim Jones 9:51 am 21 Jun 12

c_c said :

Jim Jones said :

Pandora is an excellent example, and is growing at a very large rate (as are similar institutional repositories).

Complaining that there isn’t enough information being collected in an era dominated by information overload and an exponential growth in digital archiving seems pretty bizarre to me.

People researching this era in 50 years are hardly going to be starved for information.
Regardless, the argument is anomalous: “How will we know what the papers were saying about stuff when the papers ceased to exist?” It’s an anomalous question. Once printed newspapers cease to be primary sources of information, then they’re not worth consulting as historical records.

This has got to be a wind up, no one could possibly have such difficulty understanding something.

News is moving online, including the newspapers. The hard copies will eventually cease, replaced by a medium which isn’t archived in a regulated manner.

Online archives take a snap shot at present, they don’t archive in the comprehensive manner needed for research, or as current physical archives do.

Pandora doesn’t archive The Canberra Times online, in fact they don’t seem to archive any papers’ websites.

The RiotACT was selected for archiving, a snapshot taken on a single day back in 2001.
Pandora has the site listed as not being re-archived. That snapshot is it, despite all that has happened since in ten years.

Those media organisations that are cultivating comprehensive online archives, like The Times and NY Times charge for access.

The only thing that’s bizarre is thinking just because there’s a plethora of information at one point in time means that information will somehow always be available.

“Once the newspapers are gone, archivists won’t know where to get information from.”

“Lol” is my response. That’s all it deserves. Talk to an archivist for 30 seconds and they’ll start laughing at this sort of guff.

Thumper 7:11 pm 20 Jun 12

HenryBG said :

Thumper said :

News is a crooked organisation run by liars, cheats and thieves.

Of course.

Do you ever think about what you write?

Seriously?

They’re right now busy throwing the people who run News in gaol, one-by-one, in the UK.

Seriously.

I’m sorry, but just exactly who in Australia has been charged with anything?

I mean, you know, these liars, cheats and thieves that you speak of?

Seriously?

c_c 6:47 pm 20 Jun 12

Jim Jones said :

Pandora is an excellent example, and is growing at a very large rate (as are similar institutional repositories).

Complaining that there isn’t enough information being collected in an era dominated by information overload and an exponential growth in digital archiving seems pretty bizarre to me.

People researching this era in 50 years are hardly going to be starved for information.
Regardless, the argument is anomalous: “How will we know what the papers were saying about stuff when the papers ceased to exist?” It’s an anomalous question. Once printed newspapers cease to be primary sources of information, then they’re not worth consulting as historical records.

This has got to be a wind up, no one could possibly have such difficulty understanding something.

News is moving online, including the newspapers. The hard copies will eventually cease, replaced by a medium which isn’t archived in a regulated manner.

Online archives take a snap shot at present, they don’t archive in the comprehensive manner needed for research, or as current physical archives do.

Pandora doesn’t archive The Canberra Times online, in fact they don’t seem to archive any papers’ websites.

The RiotACT was selected for archiving, a snapshot taken on a single day back in 2001.
Pandora has the site listed as not being re-archived. That snapshot is it, despite all that has happened since in ten years.

Those media organisations that are cultivating comprehensive online archives, like The Times and NY Times charge for access.

The only thing that’s bizarre is thinking just because there’s a plethora of information at one point in time means that information will somehow always be available.

damien haas 3:03 pm 20 Jun 12

c_c said :

Jazz said :

simsim said :

Yes, but longer form investigative journalism requires resources that free independent news sites simply don’t have. You can’t track down every false lead and be prepared to give the space to a more complex narrative when you’re constantly looking for what will look good in a short headline and lead clickthroughs.

I think there’s a place for both highly responsive, in the moment websites and for the longer form daily newspaper, and I think it’s a pity people seem to think it’s either/or.

Feel free to upgrade your account to a paid membership 🙂 it help us deliver exactly that investigative journalism you’re seeking. You can sign up or upgrade at http://the-riotact.com/sign-up

Investigative journalism is one area, another and perhaps more important one longer term is actually being a record of things. Flick though any political biography, essay, whatever, and you’ll see citation after citation that from newspapers and magazines. Heck read up on the 1980s and it’s amusing to see the number of times someone’s “influential article in The Bulletin” is cited, an era that has now passed.

So yes, there are bloggers, and there are independent news sites (present company included). And today and tomorrow they’ll do the job. But most blogs are not recorded for posterity and many independent news sites aren’t either (not sure if RA is being recorded by the NLA in anyway?)

So when people want to research this era in a decade, in 50 yrs, what will they use?

The ACT Light Rail website/blog is archived by Pandora.

That is useful for future researchers.

Many links that site had to CT articles are now of less value as the CT regularly discards its online history. i make a habit of printing to PDF any online news item i reference in a light rail article.

I went looking for something that Save The Ridge had written about the routes selected for the GDE and although those folks have folded their website, I found it at the Internet Archive. You would be surprised what they have hoovered up over the years.

Jim Jones 2:55 pm 20 Jun 12

c_c said :

Jim Jones said :

c_c said :

So when people want to research this era in a decade, in 50 yrs, what will they use?

Easily searchable digital archives.

lol, what digital archives and what will the contain?

Just the other day I was given a link to an SMH article from 2003 which was no longer online. I’d have to check the print edition at the library.

Under Copyright law, all printed materials end up at the National Library.
Under Commonwealth information laws, all government papers end up in the National Archives.

Law doesn’t apply to online materials.

There are efforts, like the library’s Pandora and Trove programs and other institutions like Library of Congress are doing similar things, but they’re not comprehensive.
There are private web archives, but when they go bust (and some have) then that data is gone.

Pandora is an excellent example, and is growing at a very large rate (as are similar institutional repositories).

Complaining that there isn’t enough information being collected in an era dominated by information overload and an exponential growth in digital archiving seems pretty bizarre to me.

People researching this era in 50 years are hardly going to be starved for information.

Regardless, the argument is anomalous: “How will we know what the papers were saying about stuff when the papers ceased to exist?” It’s an anomalous question. Once printed newspapers cease to be primary sources of information, then they’re not worth consulting as historical records.

c_c 2:26 pm 20 Jun 12

Jim Jones said :

c_c said :

So when people want to research this era in a decade, in 50 yrs, what will they use?

Easily searchable digital archives.

lol, what digital archives and what will the contain?

Just the other day I was given a link to an SMH article from 2003 which was no longer online. I’d have to check the print edition at the library.

Under Copyright law, all printed materials end up at the National Library.
Under Commonwealth information laws, all government papers end up in the National Archives.

Law doesn’t apply to online materials.

There are efforts, like the library’s Pandora and Trove programs and other institutions like Library of Congress are doing similar things, but they’re not comprehensive.
There are private web archives, but when they go bust (and some have) then that data is gone.

Jim Jones 1:57 pm 20 Jun 12

c_c said :

So when people want to research this era in a decade, in 50 yrs, what will they use?

Easily searchable digital archives.

c_c 1:31 pm 20 Jun 12

Jazz said :

simsim said :

Yes, but longer form investigative journalism requires resources that free independent news sites simply don’t have. You can’t track down every false lead and be prepared to give the space to a more complex narrative when you’re constantly looking for what will look good in a short headline and lead clickthroughs.

I think there’s a place for both highly responsive, in the moment websites and for the longer form daily newspaper, and I think it’s a pity people seem to think it’s either/or.

Feel free to upgrade your account to a paid membership 🙂 it help us deliver exactly that investigative journalism you’re seeking. You can sign up or upgrade at http://the-riotact.com/sign-up

Investigative journalism is one area, another and perhaps more important one longer term is actually being a record of things. Flick though any political biography, essay, whatever, and you’ll see citation after citation that from newspapers and magazines. Heck read up on the 1980s and it’s amusing to see the number of times someone’s “influential article in The Bulletin” is cited, an era that has now passed.

So yes, there are bloggers, and there are independent news sites (present company included). And today and tomorrow they’ll do the job. But most blogs are not recorded for posterity and many independent news sites aren’t either (not sure if RA is being recorded by the NLA in anyway?)

So when people want to research this era in a decade, in 50 yrs, what will they use?

Diggety 12:40 pm 20 Jun 12

Jazz said :

simsim said :

Yes, but longer form investigative journalism requires resources that free independent news sites simply don’t have. You can’t track down every false lead and be prepared to give the space to a more complex narrative when you’re constantly looking for what will look good in a short headline and lead clickthroughs.

I think there’s a place for both highly responsive, in the moment websites and for the longer form daily newspaper, and I think it’s a pity people seem to think it’s either/or.

Feel free to upgrade your account to a paid membership 🙂 it help us deliver exactly that investigative journalism you’re seeking. You can sign up or upgrade at http://the-riotact.com/sign-up

Lol, I just looked up the subscription link you gave Jazz

One of the advantages of subscription listed says Edit your ‘heat of the moment’ comments

Looks like I’ll be saving some pennies for that subscription 😉

Thumper 12:00 pm 20 Jun 12

HenryBG said :

Thumper said :

News is a crooked organisation run by liars, cheats and thieves.

Of course.

Do you ever think about what you write?

Seriously?

They’re right now busy throwing the people who run News in gaol, one-by-one, in the UK.

Seriously.

So you paint everyone with the same brush?

However, I’m sure that when someone in Australia gets charged you’ll be lining up for jury duty.

Oh wait…

HenryBG 11:20 am 20 Jun 12

Thumper said :

News is a crooked organisation run by liars, cheats and thieves.

Of course.

Do you ever think about what you write?

Seriously?

They’re right now busy throwing the people who run News in gaol, one-by-one, in the UK.

Seriously.

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