Skip to content Skip to main navigation

Opinion

Canberra’s Leading
Relationship Lawyers

Bronwyn Bishop and the trough of entitlement

By John Hargreaves 3 August 2015 42

bronwyn bishop

Hi there from the Apple Isle. I’m doing a Grumpy Old Grandad’s Terror Tour of Tassie with an old mate of mine.  He’s 75 and I’m a bit younger.

The trip down the Hume Highway was great – easy as!

The trip across the ditch on the boat was another thing altogether. Sick as!

A lay over in north Tassie saw us refreshed and off down the east coast, sucking in great scenery, eating great food and talking to the two-headed locals.

Here in Tassie, they talk about all things local: the footy, the weather and things that irritate them.

Tassie TV is interesting!  With the usual dog bites man stories where untold misery is afflicting the populace, there is interest in things federally political. Bronnie is all over Tassie!

Such a sad face doing the act of contrition two weeks after confession finished in the Church of Popular Opinion.

For old Laborites, she is the gift who keeps on giving. Just because she fell on her sceptre, doesn’t mean she won’t be the source of distraction all the way to the election.

I was watching The Drum the other night and a bloke there reminded me of when Bronnie was in the senate and performing at the senate estimates committees. He reminded us that she vilified, badgered and bullied public servants, diminishing them for their snouts being in the trough. What goes around, comes around.

Well, what is it about going to fundraisers in a chopper, getting the taxpayer to pay for the transport to some friends’ weddings (but paying back months after the event and only after being sprung), drinking out of an official gift tea seli gift to the Parliament from the Queen, a thousand bucks of limo travel in a day, doesn’t smack of a hooter in the trough?

What is it about using the speaker’s office as a fundraising venue didn’t she get?

Here are a couple of reasons why she had to go.

She had her nose firmly stuck in the trough of entitlement. She has been sprung and found guilty of misusing her office to a greater degree than Peter Slipper who had the grace to stand aside while being investigated.

She continually delivers a distraction to government policies and propaganda.

She has lost the confidence of too many of her colleagues.

She showed the most political partisanship in this high office unparralelled in history.

I was an assistant speaker for many years and met many speakers from both persuasions right across the Commonwealth. All of them had my respect as guardians of the dignity of the parliament.

The biggest sin for which she should have resigned is her abrogation of her sacred duty to the parliament itself. She was the most partisan speaker in 600 years.

Unforgiveable.

Unlike the ACT, bless us all, Tassie is not a Labor stronghold. It is bi-political and quite swinging in its political preferences. But they know a scandal when they see one. This had the smell of political roadkill in the air! The body is on the side of the road.

But again, as an old Laborite, I don’t want her going anywhere. Just as I don’t want Captn Tony going anywhere.

I can wait for the election to run its own course. The punter put Tony et al, including Bronnie, in, and he will pay dearly for the blight he has brought to our doorsteps.

The quote of the week has to go to Gerard Henderson on a breakfast program on Thursday, when talking about his new book on B.A.Santamaria. Gerard said “he was born at a very young age.”!

Go Gerard!


What’s Your opinion?


Please login to post your comments, or connect with
42 Responses to
Bronwyn Bishop and the trough of entitlement
Filter
Showing only Website comments
Order
Newest to Oldest
Oldest to Newst
vintage123 11:13 am 06 Aug 15

tooltime said :

Vintage 123 said:
Surely your not suggesting the governments Significant Investor Scheme (SIS) is a bad thing. Isn’t it innovative that we seek $5 million of a rich person in return for a permanent residency visa.

Most countries run similar schemes, so its not innovative. My solution is to encourage entrepreneurship, job creation, innovation and value adding to our exports as you allude to below. Not anyone waving a $5 million dollar cheque around, looking for a capital city,waterfront residential property like we have now.

Vintage 123 said: How else can we balance the so called economics 101 trade deficit?

By adding value to our exports, and building a highly skilled, globally competitive, innovative workforce. Look at Switzerlands Life Science/Biotechnology/Health sectors as a great example. The few examples we have in this space you mention, CSL, Cochlear and Blackmores. My fear is we’ve already been left behind in most other sectors.

Vintage 123 said: I mean iron ore sat at US$20 a tonne for close to 40 years. Those $150 a tonne mining boom times weren’t going to last forever. That’s why it was so important to ensure the government cashed in an them. Mining tax ring bells?

But they didn’t. Instead they dreamt up the NDIS at a starting cost of ~ $10 BILLION pa (it goes up from there) when its rolled out nationwide in 2018. Because successive governments have either failed to provide any incentives to do so or have built policy around stupid macroeconomic theories like level playing fields. They have killed manufacturing and innovation in this country on some ridiculous theory that we couldn’t compete anyway and consumers just want lower prices. Ever wondered why we are good only at digging dirt out of the ground and selling it at whatever the going rate is? It is because that’s all we have left. We don’t make socks, clothes, paper, steel or anything much else. We ship out the dirt, woodchips, raw fruit and vegetables and then we reimport the more expensive finished products, enriching businesses in some other country. And as we roll through an inevitable resources bust (it’s the commodity cycle, stupid) like a slow-motion train wreck, our leaders have left us providing nothing else but banking services and cafe lattes to each other.

Vintage 123 said:But anyway we can always export our cars, oh no we stuffed that up also at a time the dollar was at record highs. We all loved our cheaper imports then, but hey, I am sure we won’t all be paying $60k for a corolla soon. Let’s keep the export of expert education and cochlear hearing aids going, we will right!!!

Re: govt spending on the car industry. The $12B spent has only delayed the inevitable. Imagine if the govt had invested that $12B in an industry that is growing rather then shrinking, ie bio science, solar, wind, renewable energy, building ports, etc…. Instead of saving what amounts to “zero jobs in the end” we would have probably created thousands of jobs that the govt would never have had to contribute another cent towards…. Spending money on dying industries is like investing in a dud company. It might feel good to be able to help, but ultimately your just delaying the inevitable and going to get a massive loss on investment. Spending money to accelerate the growth of an industry would likely return the govt money in taxes, jobs, productivity and even as dividends if they structured it correctly.

Vintage 123 said: Well, what are the farmers meant to do? There’s no pension for ya if you stay on the farm, so farmers see the city folk in their multi million dollar homes still receiving their pensions and think, hey this ain’t fair, I have slogged my guts out for years on this farm and don’t get a government pension if I stay in my own home? What the!!!!! Up goes for the for sale sign as they get old and truely run out of money and how many buyers are young aspiring australian farmers = nil. So if a chinese buyers offers cash then what are meant to do? Surely you don’t expect them to not sell whilst going broke on no income as they reach age 70 do you?

You retire to the coast, or take the fat cheque & move to a location that supports farming business. Older article, but the last few lines sum it up nicely… http://www.theland.com.au/news/agriculture/agribusiness/general-news/austasia-milks-china-market/2678038.aspx?storypage=0

Ha, good stuff, you made me laugh.

tooltime 9:50 pm 05 Aug 15

Vintage 123 said:
Surely your not suggesting the governments Significant Investor Scheme (SIS) is a bad thing. Isn’t it innovative that we seek $5 million of a rich person in return for a permanent residency visa.

Most countries run similar schemes, so its not innovative. My solution is to encourage entrepreneurship, job creation, innovation and value adding to our exports as you allude to below. Not anyone waving a $5 million dollar cheque around, looking for a capital city,waterfront residential property like we have now.

Vintage 123 said: How else can we balance the so called economics 101 trade deficit?

By adding value to our exports, and building a highly skilled, globally competitive, innovative workforce. Look at Switzerlands Life Science/Biotechnology/Health sectors as a great example. The few examples we have in this space you mention, CSL, Cochlear and Blackmores. My fear is we’ve already been left behind in most other sectors.

Vintage 123 said: I mean iron ore sat at US$20 a tonne for close to 40 years. Those $150 a tonne mining boom times weren’t going to last forever. That’s why it was so important to ensure the government cashed in an them. Mining tax ring bells?

But they didn’t. Instead they dreamt up the NDIS at a starting cost of ~ $10 BILLION pa (it goes up from there) when its rolled out nationwide in 2018. Because successive governments have either failed to provide any incentives to do so or have built policy around stupid macroeconomic theories like level playing fields. They have killed manufacturing and innovation in this country on some ridiculous theory that we couldn’t compete anyway and consumers just want lower prices. Ever wondered why we are good only at digging dirt out of the ground and selling it at whatever the going rate is? It is because that’s all we have left. We don’t make socks, clothes, paper, steel or anything much else. We ship out the dirt, woodchips, raw fruit and vegetables and then we reimport the more expensive finished products, enriching businesses in some other country. And as we roll through an inevitable resources bust (it’s the commodity cycle, stupid) like a slow-motion train wreck, our leaders have left us providing nothing else but banking services and cafe lattes to each other.

Vintage 123 said:But anyway we can always export our cars, oh no we stuffed that up also at a time the dollar was at record highs. We all loved our cheaper imports then, but hey, I am sure we won’t all be paying $60k for a corolla soon. Let’s keep the export of expert education and cochlear hearing aids going, we will right!!!

Re: govt spending on the car industry. The $12B spent has only delayed the inevitable. Imagine if the govt had invested that $12B in an industry that is growing rather then shrinking, ie bio science, solar, wind, renewable energy, building ports, etc…. Instead of saving what amounts to “zero jobs in the end” we would have probably created thousands of jobs that the govt would never have had to contribute another cent towards…. Spending money on dying industries is like investing in a dud company. It might feel good to be able to help, but ultimately your just delaying the inevitable and going to get a massive loss on investment. Spending money to accelerate the growth of an industry would likely return the govt money in taxes, jobs, productivity and even as dividends if they structured it correctly.

Vintage 123 said: Well, what are the farmers meant to do? There’s no pension for ya if you stay on the farm, so farmers see the city folk in their multi million dollar homes still receiving their pensions and think, hey this ain’t fair, I have slogged my guts out for years on this farm and don’t get a government pension if I stay in my own home? What the!!!!! Up goes for the for sale sign as they get old and truely run out of money and how many buyers are young aspiring australian farmers = nil. So if a chinese buyers offers cash then what are meant to do? Surely you don’t expect them to not sell whilst going broke on no income as they reach age 70 do you?

You retire to the coast, or take the fat cheque & move to a location that supports farming business. Older article, but the last few lines sum it up nicely… http://www.theland.com.au/news/agriculture/agribusiness/general-news/austasia-milks-china-market/2678038.aspx?storypage=0

Related Articles

CBR Tweets

Sign up to our newsletter

Top
Copyright © 2018 Region Group Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.
the-riotact.com | aboutregional.com.au | b2bmagazine.com.au | thisiscanberra.com

Search across the site