Skip to content Skip to main navigation

Business

We develop leaders who transform
business, society & economies

Canberra youth to learn the Huawei way…

By johnboy 2 September 2013 38

Chief MInister Gallagher has announced she’s deepening Canberra’s ties with the People’s Liberation Army subsidiary tech giant Huawei (which has been banned from working on the NBN for national security reasons):

Chief Minister Katy Gallagher today secured an agreement with Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei for local ACT students and academics to study and learn with the company in China.

Visiting Huawei’s Shanghai R&D centre, the Chief Minister said the company searched the world for the best and brightest ICT students and was pleased that Huawei had recognised that the ACT had both.

“Local students and academics will benefit greatly from exposure to one of the largest research and development companies in the world, through the Huawei Australia Undergraduate Work Experience Program,” the Chief Minster said.

The undergraduate work experience program will see two ACT students travel to Beijing and Shenzhen every year for a 3-week, hands-on training and workshop program at Huawei’s university, innovation centres and laboratories.

“This will be a fantastic experience for these students to learn from one of leading global information and communications technology solutions provider, Huawei and share their learnings with their peers,” the Chief Minister said.

Four ACT academics and/or researchers will also be selected to work with Huawei to tailor a program in China that aligns best with their academic fields and disciplines.

What’s Your opinion?


Please login to post your comments, or connect with
38 Responses to
Canberra youth to learn the Huawei way…
Filter
Showing only Website comments
Order
Newest to Oldest
Oldest to Newst
CraigT 4:53 pm 04 Sep 13

watto23 said :

All the conspiracy nutters saying it affects your clearance, have no idea. If they did, can they explain why a Chinese born Australian citizen person can get an Australian govt security clearance?

Dunno. Did they ask Joel Fitzgibbon to be their referee, maybe?

davo101 1:46 pm 04 Sep 13

Robertson said :

Without a clearance, you’ll be fixing photocopiers in malls and other such “interesting” work.

ROFL.

You are aware that there is more to the world than the APS don’t you?

Robertson 1:13 pm 04 Sep 13

davo101 said :

Robertson said :

I am not aware that our government arbitrarily detains and murders its citizens.

Must be nice in your black-and-white world, where everyone wears an appropriately coloured hat to indicate their goodness/badness.

Robertson said :

Do you imagine you will be allowed on-site by DFAT to work on this project?

Seriously? The most interesting IT job you can think of is working for DFAT?

Without a clearance, you’ll be fixing photocopiers in malls and other such “interesting” work.

Robertson 1:11 pm 04 Sep 13

Postalgeek said :

Robertson said :

Postalgeek said :

I’m under no delusions about China’s IT espionage, and the idea of China intelligence importing two IT undergrads with the intent of trying to recruit them in the space of three weeks seems utterly redundant.

Good-oh, I’d like to nominate you for the position of CEO in the new Ben Chifley Building. You obviously have what it takes.

You mean Director-General? Keep it up. One day you might actually post something of substance.

Oh, you think *that lot* are actually going to move into the building built according to plans supplied to the Chinese already, and whose tight security was breached by (among others, no doubt) a drunken Skyfire reveller jumping into its footings?

watto23 12:16 pm 04 Sep 13

All the conspiracy nutters saying it affects your clearance, have no idea. If they did, can they explain why a Chinese born Australian citizen person can get an Australian govt security clearance?

I don’t agree with the Chinese regimes treatment of Tibet, but they aren’t going to change their mind. At least form some alliances and they may actually be willing to listen.

There is probably always a risk dealing with Chinese companies, but there is always a risk in not dealing with them too.

Dilandach 12:08 pm 04 Sep 13

China must have one badass system if they can create ‘Manchurian candidates’ to unleash on the IT world in three weeks.

Postalgeek 11:18 am 04 Sep 13

Robertson said :

Postalgeek said :

I’m under no delusions about China’s IT espionage, and the idea of China intelligence importing two IT undergrads with the intent of trying to recruit them in the space of three weeks seems utterly redundant.

Good-oh, I’d like to nominate you for the position of CEO in the new Ben Chifley Building. You obviously have what it takes.

You mean Director-General? Keep it up. One day you might actually post something of substance.

davo101 10:17 am 04 Sep 13

Robertson said :

I am not aware that our government arbitrarily detains and murders its citizens.

Must be nice in your black-and-white world, where everyone wears an appropriately coloured hat to indicate their goodness/badness.

Robertson said :

Do you imagine you will be allowed on-site by DFAT to work on this project?

Seriously? The most interesting IT job you can think of is working for DFAT?

Robertson 10:13 am 04 Sep 13

Postalgeek said :

I’m under no delusions about China’s IT espionage, and the idea of China intelligence importing two IT undergrads with the intent of trying to recruit them in the space of three weeks seems utterly redundant.

Good-oh, I’d like to nominate you for the position of CEO in the new Ben Chifley Building. You obviously have what it takes.

Robertson 9:53 am 04 Sep 13

davo101 said :

Robertson said :

Our side doesn’t farm human organs from political prisoners. Get it?

Interesting where some people draw the line. Summary execution by drone, that’s OK. Go in after and see if there are any useful organs in the wreckage, whoa too far not OK.

I am not aware that our government arbitrarily detains and murders its citizens. In China, this is a standard occurrence, with the added horror that the detained citizen will be tissue-typed and then subsequently find themselves re-arrested for a final medical procedure when that tissue-type is matched by a Party-connected prospective donee.

Trying to find an equivalence between the horror of the totalitarian state in question and actions that occur in a war zone is a sign of you having spent too much time on your Arts degree.

davo101 said :

Robertson said :

If you imagine it is possible to do anything much that’s interesting in the IT industry without a security clearance, then you have a good imagination indeed.

If you define “interesting” as requiring a security clearance then, by definition, you won’t. If you define “interesting” as holding the attention or curiosity then there are plenty of interesting IT jobs that don’t need a security clearance. Microsoft runs a large research lab in China I’m sure they’d be happy to talk.

So… having spent three months as an apprentice to the PLA, you now have a job with Microsoft.

Microsoft wins a contract to upgrade, say, Dept. of FAT to Lync.

Do you imagine you will be allowed on-site by DFAT to work on this project?

*** Of course, I am referring here to an ideal world where Federal Govt. Departments are doing their job properly and not allowing any non-citizens or uncleared people to work on their IT systems.
I recall some defence clearance whistleblowers a few years ago who put that “ideal world” scenario into perspective.

davo101 9:25 am 04 Sep 13

Robertson said :

Our side doesn’t farm human organs from political prisoners. Get it?

Interesting where some people draw the line. Summary execution by drone, that’s OK. Go in after and see if there are any useful organs in the wreckage, whoa too far not OK.

Robertson said :

If you imagine it is possible to do anything much that’s interesting in the IT industry without a security clearance, then you have a good imagination indeed.

If you define “interesting” as requiring a security clearance then, by definition, you won’t. If you define “interesting” as holding the attention or curiosity then there are plenty of interesting IT jobs that don’t need a security clearance. Microsoft runs a large research lab in China I’m sure they’d be happy to talk.

Postalgeek 11:28 pm 03 Sep 13

LSWCHP said :

Do you really think that someone would sacrifice their career and freedom (ala Bradley Manning) in order to satisfy your desire for referenced evidence on RA? Not me. Just carry on in dreamland bro.

Nose tapping is the best you’ll get in this arena. If you choose to ignore the nose action, well that’s your choice and good on you, but stuff may happen. Refer to the advice at the bottom of post #20 for an example. Robertson seems to be a realist, and have some understanding of the situation.

In the meantime Google is your friend.

I’m under no delusions about China’s IT espionage, and the idea of China intelligence importing two IT undergrads with the intent of trying to recruit them in the space of three weeks seems utterly redundant. China’s cyberspace espionage is hardly cloak-and-dagger; it’s on an industrial scale that swamps its targets and is renowned for its brazenness, and often accomplished through techniques as simple and obvious as phishing.

Our situation is further compromised by the fact our economic relations with China in the current global economic climate are so one-sided that that our recourse is limited in the event of a diplomatic incident involving IT espionage. They don’t care if they’re caught, so why piss around with such convoluted covert pretence?

The horse bolted long ago. Exchanges, job websites, and fellowships between our alumni and China have been going on for years. Not to mention the large number of Chinese nationals residing in Australia, whose mobilisation was clearly demonstrated during the passage of the Olympic flame in Canberra.

And there is always the possibility that our students might bring home some knowledge.

LSWCHP 9:18 pm 03 Sep 13

Postalgeek said :

Robertson said :

Postalgeek said :

We’ve had Chinese students coming to Australia for years, and studying for years at a time. If China wants to open a covert dialogue with someone, is there a rule that it must happen in China?

And preventing our students from studying in China for three weeks is going to accomplish what?

Let’s refer you to posts #3 & #15.

If you imagine it is possible to do anything much that’s interesting in the IT industry without a security clearance, then you have a good imagination indeed.

Idioms might answer complex issues for you, but they don’t answer complex issues for me.

Refer me to a logical, informed argument against it, with referenced evidence, and I might be swayed, but referring me to nose tapping and slogans doesn’t cut it.

Do you really think that someone would sacrifice their career and freedom (ala Bradley Manning) in order to satisfy your desire for referenced evidence on RA? Not me. Just carry on in dreamland bro.

Nose tapping is the best you’ll get in this arena. If you choose to ignore the nose action, well that’s your choice and good on you, but stuff may happen. Refer to the advice at the bottom of post #20 for an example. Robertson seems to be a realist, and have some understanding of the situation.

In the meantime Google is your friend.

Deckard 7:17 pm 03 Sep 13

Don’t Huawei make most of the mobile phone towers in Australia? I’m sure they don’t need to recruit a bunch of school kids to do their dirty work.

Dilandach 6:39 pm 03 Sep 13

Robertson said :

Dilandach said :

If you think the US and UK are happily going down the path of freedom and democracy, you’d be seriously mistaken. They’re both at a cross roads but its as plain as day that they’re both heading for totalitarianism. The US more rapidly than the UK.

I’m trying to get a handle on your argument – you’re unhappy with the policy direction of certain western democracies, therefore unutterably corrupt and murderous totalitarian states are OK?

Do you have a twin, or are you the one that comes to our weekly section meeting to regale us with a long-winded babble of illogical non-sequiturs?

Whilst the technology doesn’t quite exist yet to post in pop-up book form, I’ll do my best to explain it for you.

Its the old “Oh, we’d never do that!”

A regime that kidnaps people, tortures them and imprisons them with no legal recourse. “Oh, we’d never do that! But when we do, its extraordinary rendition, enhanced interrogation techniques and imprisonment for the worst of the worst that don’t deserve rights.”

A regime that kills people outright with no due process IE assassinations. “Oh, we’d never do that! But when it happens, we’re sure they deserved it. If they didn’t then its collateral damage. Those terrorists hide among the population. Its for your safety”

Creating a profit around imprisoning people. “Oh, we’d never do that! But its for the protection of the community. So what if the US has 5 percent of the world’s population but a quarter of its prisoners.”

A regime monitors its civilians, constantly and always. “Oh, we’d never do that! But when it happens, its indirect, its by accident, its stopped terror attacks and it keeps you safe!”

You’re either foolish or ignorant if you think that things are only going to improve in that respect. The powers granted after 9/11 and since, they haven’t been rescinded and doubtful that they ever will because its for ‘protection’. The US and UK aren’t quite at the level of some of the worst regimes but they’re certainly not pure as the driven snow either. They’re well on their way.

FXST01 6:01 pm 03 Sep 13

OK students for your homework this weekend, I want a complete list of username and passwords from any two companies on the approved teacher’s list.

Postalgeek 5:39 pm 03 Sep 13

Robertson said :

Postalgeek said :

We’ve had Chinese students coming to Australia for years, and studying for years at a time. If China wants to open a covert dialogue with someone, is there a rule that it must happen in China?

And preventing our students from studying in China for three weeks is going to accomplish what?

Let’s refer you to posts #3 & #15.

If you imagine it is possible to do anything much that’s interesting in the IT industry without a security clearance, then you have a good imagination indeed.

Idioms might answer complex issues for you, but they don’t answer complex issues for me.

Refer me to a logical, informed argument against it, with referenced evidence, and I might be swayed, but referring me to nose tapping and slogans doesn’t cut it.

Related Articles

CBR Tweets

Sign up to our newsletter

Top
Copyright © 2018 Region Group Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.
the-riotact.com | aboutregional.com.au | b2bmagazine.com.au | thisiscanberra.com

Search across the site