Culture Jamming goes too far with drug laced lollies at MacDonalds?

johnboy 26 February 2009 139

The Canberra Times reports that two 16 year old girls from Palmerston and Harrison have been charged with acts endangering health after allegedly leaving lollies in the kiddie pit at Gungahlin Maccas.

    “Police allege that the two girls concealed over-the-counter, non-prescription tablets one a mild stimulant and the other a pain-killing medication inside soft lollies and deliberately left them in the children’s play area.”

The kids who took them are reportedly unharmed.


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139 Responses to Culture Jamming goes too far with drug laced lollies at MacDonalds?
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chewy14 chewy14 4:58 pm 27 Feb 09

No,
it would be a better place to buy them.

Pommy bastard Pommy bastard 4:55 pm 27 Feb 09

Why, is it a better place to leave adulterated lollies? 😉

sepi sepi 4:54 pm 27 Feb 09

If only they’d had a youth centre in Gungahlin ey?

Pommy bastard Pommy bastard 4:49 pm 27 Feb 09

Granny said :

I’m sorry you took it that way, PB. I was hoping that we could actually just discuss something.

Hey Granny, I was hoping we could to, sorry if you took it as me backing off from debate, I just found your saying my child could murder a bit offensive that’s all.

sepi said :

So given that ‘pushing for’ = inciting, we are all in agreement that your comments are inciting violence.

No, “pushing for” does not equal “inciting”, and by removing it from context you do nothing but diminish your arguement. The “Death Penalty” is not a lynch mob, it is the lawful execution of a criminal. It’s not available in Aus, but that wouldn’t stop me form expressing that I would view it as an apt punishment at any trial.

Disaffected youth is a tough issue. Given we don’t have the death penalty, someone will have to try to think of something else to do with this pair.

Exactly right, spot on, you’ve got it!

VYBerlinaV8_the_one_they_all_copy VYBerlinaV8_the_one_they_all_copy 4:49 pm 27 Feb 09

Jimbo Jones – I was responding to the comments you made toward me in post #48, which were somewhat inflammatory. (moderation??)

Rude comments aside, you made the argument that teens don’t typically know right from wrong, because of the part of their brain that gets used, and because they don’t think of the repercussions of their actions.

You then said that knowing the difference between right from wrong is a particularly uninsightful thing to say. That’s why I responded.

Also, you mentioned in another post (#71) that you found it depressing that people on this forum get so worked up about crime. I agree that this occurs, but how about pointing your idea of ‘understanding the reason why’ towards this problem. Have you ever considered that people get cranky because they feel justice isn’t served, and that sometimes terrible crimes appear to go almost unpunished? I’m not casting an opinion either way here (just so we’re crystal clear), but I find it unsurprising.

Also, I stick to my original position – these girls knew exactly what they were doing. If it were my child I’d be calling for harsh punishment to deter others from trying something similar. (And Jimbo, don’t go reading anything special into the term ‘harsh punishment’, it means only what it says).

sepi sepi 4:44 pm 27 Feb 09

So given that ‘pushing for’ = inciting, we are all in agreement that your comments are inciting violence.

Disaffected youth is a tough issue. Given we don’t have the death penalty, someone will have to try to think of something else to do with this pair.

Granny Granny 4:43 pm 27 Feb 09

I’m sorry you took it that way, PB. I was hoping that we could actually just discuss something.

Pommy bastard Pommy bastard 4:41 pm 27 Feb 09

FC said :

“Right, I’ll explain this very slowly, with subtitles and notes, so that people here can understand;
If it had been my toddler (which it was not) they attempted to harm in this way (which they did not), I’d be pushing for them to hang(my reaction would be to want the death penalty for them), with a clear conscience. (I would not find it morally unsupportable.)”

So the dealth penalty doesn’t count as voilence in your book?

It counts as violence, I’ve never denied counts as violence?

FC FC 4:21 pm 27 Feb 09

crap – I wasn’t going engage anymore.
Just forget I said anything and I’ll just refer to my post no# 77

FC FC 4:19 pm 27 Feb 09

“Right, I’ll explain this very slowly, with subtitles and notes, so that people here can understand;
If it had been my toddler (which it was not) they attempted to harm in this way (which they did not), I’d be pushing for them to hang(my reaction would be to want the death penalty for them), with a clear conscience. (I would not find it morally unsupportable.)”

So the dealth penalty doesn’t count as voilence in your book?

Gobbo Gobbo 4:06 pm 27 Feb 09

I still find it hard to believe that people were excusing the behaviour of the 16 year olds and they wouldn’t have realised the consequences of their actions.

What a load of big hooey.

*smiling sweetly* 🙂

Pommy bastard Pommy bastard 4:03 pm 27 Feb 09

My concern is rather that I think statements of the kind I quoted at #93 constitute lynch mob type behaviour — incitements to violence.

I find them more an open and honest expression of the intial reation to the affront.

However, isn’t it the function of places like this to express and debate these reactions, as we have been, in a place where each of us is free to express and justify or thoughts?

And hasn’t it been amply demonstrated that when challenged on our reactions we have had the chance to contextualise and validate this?

Pommy bastard Pommy bastard 3:56 pm 27 Feb 09

Granny said :

Calling for sixteen year old girls to be hanged is invisible writing only to you, PB. I don’t know how serious you are or aren’t, but what if somebody took it seriously and did hang one of them? Would that be right? Really? I think everyone would be horrified.

Right, I’ll explain this very slowly, with subtitles and notes, so that people here can understand;
If it had been my toddler (which it was not) they attempted to harm in this way (which they did not), I’d be pushing for them to hang(my reaction would be to want the death penalty for them), with a clear conscience. (I would not find it morally unsupportable.)

I think statements such of those are incitements to violence, whether by individuals or the state.

Well you can choose to use my words as an incitement to violence if you wish, others may be able to read it without that emotive response. It neither calls for a “lynch mob” nor does it incite others to violence, it is the response of a father at some malicious act against an innocent child.

As a person who has children at both ends of the spectrum it is very real to me that it could be my child who was poisoned and it could also be my child doing the poisoning.

Do you really think your child could poison another child? How have you raised them to do that? I’m sure my daughter would slit her own throat before she would do such a thing.

Nobody ever believes that somebody they love is capable of something terrible. We all know them too well and they just wouldn’t do it.

Yet how often have good people been shocked to discover that their well-respected neighbour is a murderer or their husband is a paedophile or their daughter has joined a suicide pact on the internet?

I don’t know, how many?

It could be my children and it could be yours, as much as you hate to believe it. You can try and instil worthwhile values, you can try and give them a loving environment, but at the end of the day they are individuals who make their own choices – who might get in with the wrong crowd, who might be using mind-altering substances or suffering post-traumatic stress from a rape they were too ashamed to tell you about.

Please limit your predictions to your own kids eh? Please don’t generalise to other people’s it’s insulting and without fact.

I just want you to think about “if it happened to my child” from the perspective of the knock on the door by the police officer as well as from the perspective of the kid in the ambulance. There is potentially only a decade of difference between the two.

Now that is a good point, and one for debate. We (I) have only looked at this from the perspective of the injured party. Though I must say I find it impossible to imagine my daughter as one of the malicious bitches.

GB GB 3:48 pm 27 Feb 09

I’m not particularly concerned about which poster did or did not use the words ‘lynch mob’.

My concern is rather that I think statements of the kind I quoted at #93 constitute lynch mob type behaviour — incitements to violence.

For the reasons I outlined above, and were more eloquently expressed at #104, I think this is something we should all try not to do.

Whipping up an emotional frenzy, or giving licence for people to whip up their own, is not going to help us — particularly when that frenzy is focussed on retribution. The threat to those little kids cannot be fixed by abusing the teenagers. I don’t want those girls to be killed, or buried, or abused, or tortured. I think that anybody who did that, or who contributed to inciting it, should not have a clear conscience.

I really do think we can, and should try to, do better than baying for blood.

Gobbo Gobbo 3:36 pm 27 Feb 09

Hellspice was the first to offer killing as a solution. But lets all jump on the Bastard, eh?

🙂

*giggles*

Still, they were only16 and we all remember what we were like, eh?

*wink wink*

Granny Granny 3:15 pm 27 Feb 09

Calling for sixteen year old girls to be hanged is invisible writing only to you, PB. I don’t know how serious you are or aren’t, but what if somebody took it seriously and did hang one of them? Would that be right? Really? I think everyone would be horrified.

I think statements such of those are incitements to violence, whether by individuals or the state.

As a person who has children at both ends of the spectrum it is very real to me that it could be my child who was poisoned and it could also be my child doing the poisoning.

Nobody ever believes that somebody they love is capable of something terrible. We all know them too well and they just wouldn’t do it.

Yet how often have good people been shocked to discover that their well-respected neighbour is a murderer or their husband is a paedophile or their daughter has joined a suicide pact on the internet?

It could be my children and it could be yours, as much as you hate to believe it. You can try and instil worthwhile values, you can try and give them a loving environment, but at the end of the day they are individuals who make their own choices – who might get in with the wrong crowd, who might be using mind-altering substances or suffering post-traumatic stress from a rape they were too ashamed to tell you about.

I just want you to think about “if it happened to my child” from the perspective of the knock on the door by the police officer as well as from the perspective of the kid in the ambulance. There is potentially only a decade of difference between the two.

Pommy bastard Pommy bastard 1:42 pm 27 Feb 09

sepi said :

When they KKK had a fun night out, do you think they ran thru the streets shouting
‘let us all form an orderly lynch mob’?

Or did they just scream out ‘string ’em up’?

Or sprayed the town with invisible writings that only those opposed to it could read….

Kramer Kramer 1:34 pm 27 Feb 09

Yep, pretty concerning as we regularly take the kidlets to Maccas for a play, letting them run amok while we have a coffee. In the future I may have to start doing a sweep of the play area first…

Gobbo Gobbo 1:19 pm 27 Feb 09

I think they shouted “Guess whose Mum’s got a Whirlpool!”

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