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Defective Car on Northbourne Ave

By facet 7 May 2011 39

police car

Quis custodiet ipsos custodes? (If you’re the police, who will police the police?)

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Defective Car on Northbourne Ave
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edlang 10:36 am 23 May 11

Punter said :

Aus road rules – Division 2 ‘Stop Signals’ – rule # 54 – ‘Giving a Stop Signal’ reads:

(1) The driver of a vehicle must give a stop signal by means of the vehicle’s brake lights.

(2) However, if the vehicle’s brake lights are not in working order or are not clearly visible, or the vehicle is not fitted with brake lights, the driver must give the stop signal by giving a hand signal in accordance with rule 55, or using a mechanical signalling device fitted to the vehicle.

The photo clearly shows the vehicle giving a stop signal by way of its braking lights, albeit one is not working. Still a clear signal is given. I suspect a few uninformed recipients of speeding infringements or similar are sore about that and feel urged to bleat about any insignificant and unfounded drama which can be aimed toward Police. As for this thread, I don’t see the issue with the vehicle in this photo, but OP seems to have failed to research the issue.

http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/motorists-slugged-for-defects/story-e6frea6u-1226058563490

VEHICLE owners hit with defect notices will have to pay new on-the-spot fines, expected to rake in millions for the State Government.

The new fines – $120 for a minor defect and $250 for a major defect – will apply from July 1.

Minor defects include bald tyres, faulty brake lights and broken windscreen wipers, while major defects include faulty brakes, illegal modifications and faulty suspension. Defect notices do not currently incur a fine, although a vehicle owner must pay $26 to have the notice removed after repairs are made.

The Motor Trade Association’s SA president, Colin Clark, said a blown light bulb was an example of a fault which would incur a $120 fine and a defect sticker.

I think the defect sticker would fit quite nicely below the “NO BELT NO BRAINS” sticker, don’t you? For maximum obstruction of the rear view mirror?

Punter 9:16 pm 10 May 11

Captain RAAF said :

And, if you are unable to change a globe in your car, please also report to ACT roads as soon as practicable and hand your licence in. Thank you.

The ability to change light bulbs isn’t a requirement to hold a licence, however it must be comforting for a car owner to know who to go to when they don’t have the knowledge.

screaming banshee said :

Replacing a flouro tube isn’t hard either but how many people do you think replace it themselves in their workplace, I’m sure you’ll find most large workplaces have a procedure and someone to call when a flouro needs changing.

Comparing the replacement of a blown bulb in a vehicle with workplace procedures for flouro tube replacement is quite a wide link to make. While ACT Policing is a large workplace, it is reasonable to expect there may not be a procedure to follow in this instance. I wonder if most large workplaces may have a procedure for blown bulb replacement in their vehicle fleet? Perhaps common sense applies.

screaming banshee 8:30 pm 10 May 11

Punter said :

Replacing a blown bulb isn’t a hard job in most vehicles, it certainly doesn’t require an specialist.

Replacing a flouro tube isn’t hard either but how many people do you think replace it themselves in their workplace, I’m sure you’ll find most large workplaces have a procedure and someone to call when a flouro needs changing.

Deckard 8:23 pm 10 May 11

An independent commission against corruption should sort this whole problem out.

Mr Waffle 8:12 pm 10 May 11

Captain RAAF said :

And, if you are unable to change a globe in your car, please also report to ACT roads as soon as practicable and hand your licence in. Thank you.

Until they start requiring that sort of thing during your Ls practice, people aren’t going to bother learning it…

Captain RAAF 3:17 pm 10 May 11

Punter said :

dvaey said :

Can any police here confirm if theyre personally allowed to make small changes like that to a vehicle, like replacing a blown globe or other non-specialised jobs on the vehicles they drive, or does it have to be done through the right channels?

Replacing a blown bulb isn’t a hard job in most vehicles, it certainly doesn’t require an specialist. If you’re not comfortable with it, most automotive shops (Supercheap and the like) will help you change a bulb if you’re not comfortable doing it yourself. You might have to buy one from them though.

And, if you are unable to change a globe in your car, please also report to ACT roads as soon as practicable and hand your licence in. Thank you.

Punter 1:08 pm 10 May 11

dvaey said :

Can any police here confirm if theyre personally allowed to make small changes like that to a vehicle, like replacing a blown globe or other non-specialised jobs on the vehicles they drive, or does it have to be done through the right channels?

Replacing a blown bulb isn’t a hard job in most vehicles, it certainly doesn’t require an specialist. If you’re not comfortable with it, most automotive shops (Supercheap and the like) will help you change a bulb if you’re not comfortable doing it yourself. You might have to buy one from them though.

Punter 11:16 am 10 May 11

Aus road rules – Division 2 ‘Stop Signals’ – rule # 54 – ‘Giving a Stop Signal’ reads:

(1) The driver of a vehicle must give a stop signal by means of the vehicle’s brake lights.

(2) However, if the vehicle’s brake lights are not in working order or are not clearly visible, or the vehicle is not fitted with brake lights, the driver must give the stop signal by giving a hand signal in accordance with rule 55, or using a mechanical signalling device fitted to the vehicle.

The photo clearly shows the vehicle giving a stop signal by way of its braking lights, albeit one is not working. Still a clear signal is given. I suspect a few uninformed recipients of speeding infringements or similar are sore about that and feel urged to bleat about any insignificant and unfounded drama which can be aimed toward Police. As for this thread, I don’t see the issue with the vehicle in this photo, but OP seems to have failed to research the issue.

dvaey 10:15 am 09 May 11

scorpio63 said :

Btw, with two or three sets of constables or detectives using vehicles over a 24 hour period, I am sure that out of 6 adults, one should be able to observe a blown tail light.

Maybe they did see it, but not being authorised theyre probably unable to personally fix it and have to have it fixed through the appropriate service department. They then possibly made a decision that its not worth taking a vehicle off the road just because of one blown tail light (much how those they pull over would be thinking) and it can wait until it can be seen to by someone authorised by the AFP to replace the light globe in the vehicle.

Can any police here confirm if theyre personally allowed to make small changes like that to a vehicle, like replacing a blown globe or other non-specialised jobs on the vehicles they drive, or does it have to be done through the right channels?

TVStar 10:09 am 09 May 11

Just reported it to Crime Stoppers.

Spideydog 9:15 am 09 May 11

scorpio63 said :

Police do have exemption from the road rules under rule 305 and a particular exemption for mobile phone use.

Spideydog and Keen Golfer – I am fully aware of their regulations working for them at times.

I oppose the legislation, more so, given the AFP’s nature of work.

Read my content, I did not dispute what is fact within legislation, I am disputing that government vehicle lights and indicators should be functioning on the road while in use.

Btw, with two or three sets of constables or detectives using vehicles over a 24 hour period, I am sure that out of 6 adults, one should be able to observe a blown tail light. I have seen blown headlights on both buses regularly and AFP vehicles which is the reason I bothered to put my 50 cents worth in on this topic.

As for appreciating AFP staff efforts, Keen Golfer, I liaise with staff regularly and related to a few, which is irrelevant to the topic.

I am pretty sure that not one AFP officer would agree that rule 305 would used in the instance of a blown light on a vehicle …… what’s your point. I still made reference earlier that this particular vehicle’s light may have stopped working after being checked, or was on the way for repair or may even be an intermittent problem. You have made certain assumptions to make a generalised point. Tar and Feather them I say ………

scorpio63 said :

I oppose the legislation, more so, given the AFP’s nature of work.

When it comes to rule 305, why do you oppose it? “Nature of AFP’s work?? (except with vehicle lighting that I am sure everyone wouldn’t disagree with)

KeenGolfer 7:04 am 09 May 11

scorpio63 said :

Btw, with two or three sets of constables or detectives using vehicles over a 24 hour period, I am sure that out of 6 adults, one should be able to observe a blown tail light. I have seen blown headlights on both buses regularly and AFP vehicles which is the reason I bothered to put my 50 cents worth in on this topic.

Ok, i see where you’re coming from. Let’s say the blown light was noticed. It wouldn’t get fixed straight away. It would have to go to Ford to be fixed. It would continue to be driven until then because there’s not a huge spare fleet of vehicles and most cars are in use most of the time. The vehicle wouldn’t be taken off the road to wait for repair unless there was a more substantial issue with the vehicle – taking the vehicle for repair/servicing has to fit around operational requirements.

scorpio63 12:18 am 09 May 11

Police do have exemption from the road rules under rule 305 and a particular exemption for mobile phone use.

Spideydog and Keen Golfer – I am fully aware of their regulations working for them at times.

I oppose the legislation, more so, given the AFP’s nature of work.

Read my content, I did not dispute what is fact within legislation, I am disputing that government vehicle lights and indicators should be functioning on the road while in use.

Btw, with two or three sets of constables or detectives using vehicles over a 24 hour period, I am sure that out of 6 adults, one should be able to observe a blown tail light. I have seen blown headlights on both buses regularly and AFP vehicles which is the reason I bothered to put my 50 cents worth in on this topic.

As for appreciating AFP staff efforts, Keen Golfer, I liaise with staff regularly and related to a few, which is irrelevant to the topic.

Spideydog 7:46 pm 08 May 11

dvaey said :

KeenGolfer said :

facet, are you one of those anti-police types that will make any attempt, no matter how trivial, to belittle the police? Seriously, over a taillight?

I got defected over a missing headlight, in the middle of the day. Its not a matter of belittling the police its a matter of holding them to the same basic standards that they expect from citizens.

CanberraGirl19 said :

How exactly can they be expected to know if no one tells them?

Do you think the same law should apply to us citizens too? Do you think if you get pulled over by vehicle inspectors you can simply say ‘thank you for telling me my vehicle is defective, Ill fix that straight away when I get home’? Why should the police not be held to account? If youve got a blown brake light, you should have to go through a full roadworthy like every other driver in the territory has to.

You have WAY to many supposed interactions with Police which I would suggest is that you either frequently do the wrong thing, or the police don’t like you and enjoy harassing you ……. I would suggest the first scenario. Here’s an idea, if you see a defective Police car …… REPORT IT and stop bleating and sooking on RIOT-Act about double standards.

But from I have seen from your frequent posts on Policing stories, they seem never to be able to please you as you, as always seem to find a negative spin. Live a little bro, you may enjoy life more !!!!

georgesgenitals 6:38 pm 08 May 11

GottaLoveCanberra said :

jayskette said :

I hear that undercover police in other states use actual defective sports cars and hang around the hoon areas… lots of arrests… why isn’t there such a campaign in the ACT!

Because the modified car scene in Canberra is pretty much non existant?

The people here that are involved in organised stupidity are typically outfits like rushhour, who go far enough out of town that it’s not necessarily worth busting up meets on a regular basis.

GottaLoveCanberra 5:33 pm 08 May 11

jayskette said :

I hear that undercover police in other states use actual defective sports cars and hang around the hoon areas… lots of arrests… why isn’t there such a campaign in the ACT!

Because the modified car scene in Canberra is pretty much non existant?

Spideydog 5:00 pm 08 May 11

georgesgenitals said :

We need a nice floral teacup to host this hurricane, I reckon…

😉

Spideydog 4:58 pm 08 May 11

scorpio63 said :

Further, vehicles should be quickly looked at prior to an officer’s shift to ensure lights and indicators are functioning. Particularly so, given the line of work.

Most diligent police officers should be checking vehicles before and during shifts. Failure in doing so, should result in consequences.

Checking vehicle’s before shift all well and good, but during shift officers doing more checks of their lights to make sure they are still working correctly……. Bah hahahahahahaha – Seriously !!!!!

How do we know that this single brake light that was out, hadn’t occurred after the vehicle checks had been done at the beginning of the shift ??? How do we know or not whether this vehicle was on it’s way for repair ??? ASSumption’s being made much here …… If people are really that concerned about a single light out, instead of going on a sook fest online, how about bringing it to the attention of ACT Police so they may offer an explanation or their sincerest apologies that will hopefully be to your satisfaction.

Police do have exemption from the road rules under rule 305 and a particular exemption for mobile phone use. In the spirit of the legislation I would suggest that “broken lights” is not what was intended by rule 305 as it needs to be Reasonable the exemption apply and Reasonable care is taken at the time. In regards to mobile phone use by emergency services, yes I do agree that they shouldn’t be used (even with the specific exemption) unless in situations where it is absolutely necessary (emergency) and urgent.

PantsMan 3:22 pm 08 May 11

facet said :

Need a little legal help here folks. If I have a picture of someone committing an offense and I do not publish, am I withholding evidence?

Misprision of felony: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Misprision_of_felony

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