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Lower back pain specialist in Canberra?

By Captain RAAF - 13 May 2013 29

Hi Gang,

The missus is fighting some significant lower back pain, been a problem for her for about 3 years. Other than that, she is a fit and healthy specimen, maintaining a stunning appearance and physique.

She has visited a couple of doctors and both agreed with my diagnosis, weak core (stomach muscles) leaving the back to over-compensate and suffer accordingly.

She has tried exercise and it just leaves her in more pain. She has had scans and there is no inflammation present and no ‘smoking gun’, so she’s feeling very frustrated by the whole saga.

It’s playing havok with her morale which therefore impacts on mine, which of course affects my ability to provide the blanket of security that you all sleep under.

So, is there any lower back pain guru in Canberra I can take my cook to? She is at the end of her tether and I hate to see her suffer anymore and have to try every possible option.

Help me Obie-Wan, your’e my only hope!

What’s Your opinion?


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Lower back pain specialist in Canberra?
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HandsOnMassage 8:44 pm 30 Jul 13

As a professional remedial massage therapist, I and several of the multidisciplined professionals that I share clients with, have successfully treated and given home rehabilitation training to reduce pain and restore function to others such as your wife… A good therapist of any discipline who others keep going back to is worth finding…

Catty 5:54 pm 23 May 13

I have found Bowen therapy worked well for me for a number of conditions. Andrew Earl at Canberra Bowen Therapy in Dickson is very good. His specialty is back pain (although he also works on horses!). You won’t find him in the phone book, but you can get details and an explanation from his website http://www.canberrabowentherapy.com.au. David Tow is a physiotherapist who also does Bowen and acupuncture. He is fantastic, but it is difficult to get an appointment as he is usually booked up.

mouldy 4:28 pm 14 May 13

mouldy said :

Evidence based practice would suggest otherwise. Muscle tension and tone is more often than not the symptom and not the cause. That doesn’t mean the muscle tension/tone/spasm needs to be addressed – it does.

Anyway, I’m out. Not sure if it was on this site but:

“Never argue with an idiot. Bystanders won’t be able to tell the difference.”

nowhere did I mention the spinal cord, I said column, this includes the vertabrae and muscle attachment points. So….look at all the muscles that connect into the spinal column:
http://injuryfix.com/archives/ezine_images/iliopsoas.jpg

If you are suggesting that muscle tightness that pulls on the spinal column causing pain in discs is a myth, then you are part of the problem as why so many people are not getting relief. More often than not the area of pain (in the spine) is the not the source of the problem.

That should have read “That doesn’t mean the muscle tension/tone/spasm DOESN’ Tneed to be addressed – it does.

mouldy 4:25 pm 14 May 13

Evidence based practice would suggest otherwise. Muscle tension and tone is more often than not the symptom and not the cause. That doesn’t mean the muscle tension/tone/spasm needs to be addressed – it does.

Anyway, I’m out. Not sure if it was on this site but:

“Never argue with an idiot. Bystanders won’t be able to tell the difference.”

nowhere did I mention the spinal cord, I said column, this includes the vertabrae and muscle attachment points. So….look at all the muscles that connect into the spinal column:
http://injuryfix.com/archives/ezine_images/iliopsoas.jpg

If you are suggesting that muscle tightness that pulls on the spinal column causing pain in discs is a myth, then you are part of the problem as why so many people are not getting relief. More often than not the area of pain (in the spine) is the not the source of the problem.

rbw 3:34 pm 14 May 13

mouldy said :

” I am well experienced in these issues and a large majority of lower back pain isn’t spinal related its because of muscular dysfunction impinging on the spinal column”

If you’re talking about the spinal cord then this comment is anatomically, phsyiologically, and biomechanically impossible.

Regarding the OP – sometimes we forget that we don’t treat the scan, we treat the patient. Often it comes down to re-teaching someone how to move correctly – particularly if there is no hard evidence of damage on imaging.

nowhere did I mention the spinal cord, I said column, this includes the vertabrae and muscle attachment points. So….look at all the muscles that connect into the spinal column:
http://injuryfix.com/archives/ezine_images/iliopsoas.jpg

If you are suggesting that muscle tightness that pulls on the spinal column causing pain in discs is a myth, then you are part of the problem as why so many people are not getting relief. More often than not the area of pain (in the spine) is the not the source of the problem.

rbw 3:29 pm 14 May 13

dtc said :

While we are on this issue, can anyone recommend a good physical ‘assessor’ ie someone who can look at your gait, your stretch abilities, your flexibility, mobility strength etc etc and come up with a list of what actually is wrong. For example, tight hip flexor or tight hamstrings or bad kyphosis

(hunch) etc.

This seems to be very common in the USA, there are lots of articles on conducting physical assessments and then using that to determine future action (exercise or stretching or as needed).

But I’ve tried in Canberra with limited results. This has included physios, sports doctors and trainers. Most of them find one or two faults with a short assessment and then recommend a cure that happens to be a cure in their profession. So physios suggest massages, doctors try anti inflmmatories, trainers an exercise program. None of them seem to understand when I say I want everything assessed and none of them (apart from one doctor) recommend anything outside their actual field. (the doctor suggested strength training for a particular muscle that wasnt working properly)

So any suggestions gratefully received

And to the OP – its not just the stomach muscles. One muscle that is really affected by sitting/our lifestyle and also by back injury is the glutes (as the above doctor informed me). It should be protecting your spine, but it often ‘shuts down’ when there is back injury and you have to consciously work to get it to ‘turn on’ again. If you dont, what happens is that your back muscles take the strain and they arent strong enough – causing back pain and potential spinal injury. (google ‘Bret Contreras’ for his website – some of it is bodybuilding stuff but there is a lot of rehab stuff on it as well).

try clinic88

EvanJames 2:31 pm 14 May 13

rbw said :

(excellent post snipped).

This stuff is spot-on, unfortunately. My old L4/5 sciatic issues were fixed in the 80s by a physio who was right across all this. I still have my tennis balls! But haven’t used them in a while to release those nerve trigger points for stretching.

Now new sitting-induced back issues, lower (but not L4/5) and upper back, the lower is proving quite hard to shift. Had physio which relieved it, but the physio didn’t have any ideas for preventing it coming back, and come back it did.

They’ve invented foam rollers since the 80s and have been meaning to investigate them, I imagine they’re like that agonising deep tissue massage, ugh.

Need to find a good “back” physio who can do more than just release the vertebrae and muscles temporarily.

mouldy 1:56 pm 14 May 13

” I am well experienced in these issues and a large majority of lower back pain isn’t spinal related its because of muscular dysfunction impinging on the spinal column”

If you’re talking about the spinal cord then this comment is anatomically, phsyiologically, and biomechanically impossible.

Regarding the OP – sometimes we forget that we don’t treat the scan, we treat the patient. Often it comes down to re-teaching someone how to move correctly – particularly if there is no hard evidence of damage on imaging.

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