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Mites released to combat Scotch Broom

By Barcham - 27 March 2013 10

mites
Aceria Anthocoptes, which is of the same genus… I couldn’t find a photo of the actual mite. Sorry.

The Broom Gall mite, Aceria Genistae will be released into a rural lease near Williamsdale in an effort to combat the Scotch Broom, which is a problem weed in Australia.

“The mite will hopefully eat their way through a significant amount of Scotch Broom, which is a weed of national significance, as well as establish a colony population so they can be used in other sites, such as Namadgi,” Mr Iglesias said.

“The mite, which feeds and develops exclusively on Scotch Broom, has been provided to the ACT free-of-charge as part of a partnership with the CSIRO, the Federal Government Broom Control Taskforce, NSW Department of Primary Industry and Palerang Council. It has been used successfully in Tasmania, Victoria and NSW to control Scotch Broom. The mites will be applied to the weeds.

“The biological control of weeds has been used in the ACT to help control Paterson’s Curse, St John’s Wort and Blackberry. It is just one part of the ACT Government’s integrated approach to managing invasive and environmental weeds which also relies on herbicide and physical removal of weeds, as well as significant assistance from local Parkcare groups.

mites

[Image of mite via Wikimedia Commons]

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10 Responses to
Mites released to combat Scotch Broom
johnboy 6:26 pm 27 Mar 13

well, this is scottish!

wildturkeycanoe 6:22 pm 27 Mar 13

It mite work, if the mites work.
Why shouldn’t the Scotch Broom get a scientific name too – Cytisus scoparius, for those who need to know – like me.
It seems that just about everything brought here from England has been bad for this country….

TAMSMediaRoom 5:58 pm 27 Mar 13

Jivrashia said :

I hope this doesn’t go the way of the cane toads, foxes, and rabbits.

Unlike the rather unfortunate release of those animals, there has been over a decade of scientific research into these mites by organisations like CSIRO and Department of Primary Industry research centres to ensure there are no issues. The mites also live and dine on Scotch Broom exclusively.

bundah 5:20 pm 27 Mar 13

Jivrashia said :

I hope this doesn’t go the way of the cane toads, foxes, and rabbits.

Won’t need to worry for these little mites will be invisible so if they becomes a problem we’ll just sweep it under the carpet!

KB1971 5:14 pm 27 Mar 13

Jivrashia said :

I hope this doesn’t go the way of the cane toads, foxes, and rabbits.

Foxes and rabbits were not released to control anything but I get what you mean.

Jivrashia 4:38 pm 27 Mar 13

I hope this doesn’t go the way of the cane toads, foxes, and rabbits.

poetix 4:28 pm 27 Mar 13

Gosh! Look at the feisty one getting stuck in!

Our skies will soon be free of the curse of Scottish witches…

gooterz 4:09 pm 27 Mar 13

Sounds mitey good

Barcham 3:49 pm 27 Mar 13

We’ve been sent a photo of the release.

poetix 12:43 pm 27 Mar 13

What a great image though! It looks like an armadillo trampling down lilies.

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