Pitbulls of Fisher

johnboy 4 April 2012 51

I’ve had the below in through the contact form. Anyone know more?

The purpose of this email is to inform you that 3 animals have died today (all on the same street, in 3 different backyards) due to 2 pitballs who are loose on the streets of Fisher ACT.

These deadly animals need to be taken and put down before our children are their next victim. Residence of Ballarat and Rosebery Street have been informed by Rangers to keep your children indoors as these dogs are likely to return.

Please alert all residence within Fisher that they are not safe. And to the owner of the dogs, please hand your dogs in and save yourselves from future prosecution for the death of a person.

We cannot continue to live in fear like this.

UPDATE 04/04/12 17:22: This in from Liam:

Just phoned the domestic animal folk to see if it was now safe to walk our dogs in Fisher. They told me both dogs that had alegedly carried out attacks were now safely in the care of Domestic Animal Services at Symonston.


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Brianna Brianna 3:43 pm 26 Apr 14

As sad as I am for your dear old cat, please consider where she was when she was killed. I would love to have a cat but I refuse to consider it until I win lotto and am able to have a FULLY enclosed back yard. I don’t want to have my pet getting out and killing our beautiful wild life. Our birds and lizards.
The dogs shouldn’t have been out but then, neither should your cat.

partickthistle said :

Aggressive dogs continue to roam. Our dear old cat was taken by two dogs tonight. Our neighbour was rightly distressed from witnessing the attack and then I had to go and pick the cat up off the path. We will bury her tomorrow.

Another couple saw the dogs drop her as they were driving past. We are hoping we can identify the dogs though it’s not likely.

Most likely that the owners will get their dogs back home with little idea of the grief they have caused.

partickthistle partickthistle 10:35 pm 25 Apr 14

Aggressive dogs continue to roam. Our dear old cat was taken by two dogs tonight. Our neighbour was rightly distressed from witnessing the attack and then I had to go and pick the cat up off the path. We will bury her tomorrow.

Another couple saw the dogs drop her as they were driving past. We are hoping we can identify the dogs though it’s not likely.

Most likely that the owners will get their dogs back home with little idea of the grief they have caused.

slimshady5546 slimshady5546 4:35 pm 20 May 12

The dogs have been determined to be DANGEROUS. The owners applied for special license to keep – lost request. Now they have 28 days to appeal.
As one of the families affected by these dogs (they killed our cat), dont really care what breed they are. The dogs have been bred to HUNT and were used regularly in that capacity. They have their natural instincts for blood and should NEVER be allowed to returned to the owners.
The owners should be banned from EVER owning another dog.

74Daizies 74Daizies 7:26 pm 08 Apr 12

EvanJames said :

Deref said :

I hope their owners have been put down.

+1. Any dog, owned by the wrong scum, can become vicious and dangerous to other animals (including humans). But it’s the scum’s fault.

AGREED!!!!

Captain RAAF said :

Thirty years ago some old WW2 Vet would have heard about this, walked outside with his .303 that he carried over the Kokoda and just shot the dogs on the spot and no-one would have batted an eyelid. Everyone would have been safe, the owners would have received a visit from the plod and they would not be able to show their face down the pub for a month! Meanwhile, the Vet is getting pats on the back and free shouts at the Royal Oak for his trouble.

Apparently we’ve advanced as a society since then though and those horrible days are gone………….

There are lots of things that could be fixed that way, it worked!

pelican pelican 2:13 pm 08 Apr 12

Why can’t I get the song “Werewolves of London’ out of my head?

crackerpants crackerpants 9:55 am 08 Apr 12

Merle said :

crackerpants said :

I get a little tired of the sarcasm directed at the “won’t someone think of the children” comments, mine included. Does the right of a dog owner to let their dog roam free trump my wish to take my children out for a walk? Is there a moral imperative that means dogs should be allowed to wander anywhere they like, regardless of any other child or animal, or indeed adult they might encounter? Should dogs be allowed to stroll into my backyard and crap under my bedroom window? Repeatedly?

The reason people make fun of the ‘won’t someone think of the children?!’ hysteria is that it makes it sound as though you can’t step a foot out the door without being leaped on and torn apart by rabid dogs. How often is someone, child or adult, attacked by a dog while they’re just out walking and minding their own business? 81% of dog bites happen in the home, and the large majority of reported dog attacks are ‘attacks’ like these – on small, fuzzy animals, which, yes, is sad but is also what thousands of years of evolution have bred dogs to do.

Dog owners do not have a right to let their dogs roam freely, and responsible dog owners don’t, but sometimes accidents happen even to the best of us. A gate doesn’t latch properly, a door is left open for a minute too long and there goes Fido. What’s the solution, shall we shoot them for crapping under your window?

There are regulations and there are fines to prevent people from letting their dogs roam. I completely agree that DAS should be given more funding and more leeway to enforce those regulations, but beyond that the occasional roaming dog is a fact of suburbia.

I was going to mention in my previous post that yes, I’m sure there are responsible owners who have gaps in fences etc. I remember my parents tearing my hair out when I was a child (in another country…where front fences and gates were permitted as well) when our dog kept getting out. But my post was long enough without going into all the possible exceptions to the rule, and rioters tend not to take kindly to any discussion of lapses in absolute personal responsibility. So I do agree with you on that one.

However, how suburb seems particularly beset, and our street alone as at least 3 dogs (all different owners) which are allowed to roam at will – no attempt is made to keep them in their yard, and they are always walked off-lead. I do try to contain my hysteria 🙂 but my daughter, at the age of 17 months, was in fact rushed by one of these serial offenders as we stepped out of our own front door. No hyperbole there, I assure you. Perhaps our experiences are beyond the norm…that’s the impression I get from comparing with friends in other suburbs, and from visitors to our home. I have contacted DAS, and after one phone call I did actually see one of their vans a few times when we were out on our walks. Maybe coincidence, maybe not. I do think they try, but handing out fines to people who don’t leash their dogs as required is a pretty low priority when they are so under resourced.

EvanJames EvanJames 11:34 pm 07 Apr 12

Onceler said :

Damn straight. Reminds me of something my dad told me about a farmer who ended up shooting some dogs that kept attacking his livestock. The dogs belonged to a neighbouring hobby farmer. When polite requests to keep the dogs secure had no effect, the farmer delivered the now dead dogs to his neighbour’s doorstep. Problem solved. This would have been early 1970s, NSW north coast.

I think he could still do this. A farmer can shoot dogs or any animal on his property if he believes they are going to cause harm. Dogs from idiots in sub divisions and rural towns are causing massive problems to farmers, some are giving up and selling up, it’s got that bad.

Woody Mann-Caruso Woody Mann-Caruso 9:33 pm 07 Apr 12

That he has a dog that strikes fear into otherwise reasonable adults just by having it walk down the street, but insists on trying to prove a point anyway? That his owning an APBT in no way mitigates that most people who get this sort of dog do so as a cultural marker, and aren’t the slightest bit interested if the dog wants to ‘go ya, c*nt’ – indeed, a dangerous dog that needs to be forcibly restrained at every moment is a badge of honor?

As for his question about whether eliminating pit bulls will eliminate dangerous dogs: it’d be a pretty good start.

Oh, look at me, I’m being all classist. Well, I would be if I was talking about people who had any.

Gin02 Gin02 7:03 pm 07 Apr 12

So the breed of dog I have immediately tells you the type of person I am… Wow, I love generalisations!

I have a Staffy, therefore I MUST be a bogan/ menace to society/ pig hunting person…er shame I’m none of these.

Jethro Jethro 5:12 pm 07 Apr 12

Skidbladnir said :

Woody Mann-Caruso said :

We all know what ‘pitbull’ means. It means ‘bogan dog of the variety only owned by bogans’, you bogan.

Link 1
Link 2

What was it that you were saying something about our RSPCA CEO?

Well apparently his dog is unable to walk properly on a leash.

Skidbladnir Skidbladnir 4:57 pm 07 Apr 12

Woody Mann-Caruso said :

We all know what ‘pitbull’ means. It means ‘bogan dog of the variety only owned by bogans’, you bogan.

Link 1
Link 2

What was it that you were saying something about our RSPCA CEO?

Jethro Jethro 4:52 pm 07 Apr 12

Watson said :

Woody Mann-Caruso said :

Merle said :

OFCS. I’m sorry for the people whose animals were killed or injured, but it’s not a reason to go around screaming ‘won’t somebody think of the children!’ and pointing the finger at ‘pitbulls’, by which the screamer means, not the breed, but any dog who looks vaguely intimidating.

We all know what ‘pitbull’ means. It means ‘bogan dog of the variety only owned by bogans’, you bogan.

And when should we start screaming? When one ducks through a fence and kills somebody? Because it’s already happened, you bogan.

PS – bogan

Michael Linke, CEO of the RSPCA owns a pitbull…

Probably one of the reasons we don’t have decent laws regarding the ownership of pitbulls in the ACT.

Watson Watson 4:26 pm 07 Apr 12

Woody Mann-Caruso said :

Merle said :

OFCS. I’m sorry for the people whose animals were killed or injured, but it’s not a reason to go around screaming ‘won’t somebody think of the children!’ and pointing the finger at ‘pitbulls’, by which the screamer means, not the breed, but any dog who looks vaguely intimidating.

We all know what ‘pitbull’ means. It means ‘bogan dog of the variety only owned by bogans’, you bogan.

And when should we start screaming? When one ducks through a fence and kills somebody? Because it’s already happened, you bogan.

PS – bogan

Michael Linke, CEO of the RSPCA owns a pitbull…

scorpio63 scorpio63 1:35 pm 07 Apr 12

Its a good idea to report any dog roaming streets.

Years ago a couple of dobermanns approached me while jogging in Tuggeranong with my neighbour’s collie (an 8 yr old beautiful natured quiet and sensible dog ‘C’). Of a night we jogged the streets and reserves with few problems for 2 years.

The dobermanns crossed the road to join us as the male owner in his front yard was chatting to another bloke laughing. The dobermanns barred their teeth at C and I, bailing us up. We couldnt move forward left or right as the dogs moved in on us.

I called out to the owner for the collection of his dogs to no avail. He looked over and ignored our plight. I called out in no uncertain terms for them to be called back, after which he whistled them to return. I changed our jogging route for a week or two and returned to the reserve.

Several months later a working colleague returned after a brief break quite upset and described how her small dog had been attacked and that one dobermann was discovered in her backyard watching/guarding her little dog dying.

The pound discovered that both dogs had been involved, the owners were called and requested to collect their dobermann at her home (not a bright idea for a few reasons) – the pound should have taken the dobermann and held it until the owners were charged.

Charges were laid and the owners lost the gold dobermann although by memory the black dobermann lived. This colleague resided in the same suburb as me and the same dogs were involved.

Now, ‘ifs’ are an illusion, yet if the owner had walked inside that night for a moment or out the back, and C and I had walked on, regardless of whether the dobermanns were trying to block our path/escape, C and/or I may be disfigured or not around to tell the story.

If the dobermanns had sniffed and not barred their teeth along with barring our escape (strategies used from being trained in pig hunting and attacking) I would have believed they were only about to attack C and not myself.

Dogs who are raised to attack (left unsupervised) do try and attack people whether it be on their own and/or with other dogs. Not a high percentage nevertheless a high proportion of staffies, pit bulls and other larger dogs bred for hunting and/or guarding.

Woody Mann-Caruso Woody Mann-Caruso 11:29 am 07 Apr 12

Merle said :

OFCS. I’m sorry for the people whose animals were killed or injured, but it’s not a reason to go around screaming ‘won’t somebody think of the children!’ and pointing the finger at ‘pitbulls’, by which the screamer means, not the breed, but any dog who looks vaguely intimidating.

We all know what ‘pitbull’ means. It means ‘bogan dog of the variety only owned by bogans’, you bogan.

And when should we start screaming? When one ducks through a fence and kills somebody? Because it’s already happened, you bogan.

PS – bogan

Merle Merle 8:24 am 07 Apr 12

crackerpants said :

I get a little tired of the sarcasm directed at the “won’t someone think of the children” comments, mine included. Does the right of a dog owner to let their dog roam free trump my wish to take my children out for a walk? Is there a moral imperative that means dogs should be allowed to wander anywhere they like, regardless of any other child or animal, or indeed adult they might encounter? Should dogs be allowed to stroll into my backyard and crap under my bedroom window? Repeatedly?

The reason people make fun of the ‘won’t someone think of the children?!’ hysteria is that it makes it sound as though you can’t step a foot out the door without being leaped on and torn apart by rabid dogs. How often is someone, child or adult, attacked by a dog while they’re just out walking and minding their own business? 81% of dog bites happen in the home, and the large majority of reported dog attacks are ‘attacks’ like these – on small, fuzzy animals, which, yes, is sad but is also what thousands of years of evolution have bred dogs to do.

Dog owners do not have a right to let their dogs roam freely, and responsible dog owners don’t, but sometimes accidents happen even to the best of us. A gate doesn’t latch properly, a door is left open for a minute too long and there goes Fido. What’s the solution, shall we shoot them for crapping under your window?

There are regulations and there are fines to prevent people from letting their dogs roam. I completely agree that DAS should be given more funding and more leeway to enforce those regulations, but beyond that the occasional roaming dog is a fact of suburbia.

Onceler Onceler 6:06 pm 06 Apr 12

Met a bloke the other day who was laughing about his staffie – how it always manages to get loose while he’s out at work. This beast has smashed its way through glass doors (had to take it to the vet for stitches), ploughed through the back fence as well. He has to keep reinforcing the perimeter, but the dog always finds a way through. On a couple of these occasions it has killed cats. The owner thinks it’s pretty funny. “Eats cats for breakfast.” It’s a “real sweetie” though. Great with kids, apparently.

crackerpants crackerpants 2:35 pm 06 Apr 12

dvaey said :

crackerpants said :

Owners, good, bad or indifferent, don’t even come into it, because they’re usually far, far away.

Do you also believe that if someone shoots another person, the first person doesnt ‘even come into it, because theyre usually far, far away’? What about if someone was to place a booby trap in public, are they relieved of responsibility because theyre far away? The owner created what they have (whether by actions or lack of actions), and should be held responsible.

One thing I do find ironic, is that often those who will discriminate against a dog based on breed, would be the first to stand up if someone tried to discriminate against a human based on race or genetics. Imagine if the same ‘pitbulls are trouble and should be eliminated’ mentality was applied to ‘indigenous kids are trouble and should be eliminated’.

No, I don’t believe that at all. My point is that *at that point in time*, there is no owner to be seen, no owner in the picture, no one to discuss the dog with, so the type of owner doesn’t mean anything to me. At that point in time. Presumably a “good” owner would stop their dog getting out and roaming the streets, but at that point in time, it’s academic. But in the bigger picture, I agree, owners should be more responsible. A lot more.

I said previously that I don’t really care what sort of dog it is, but I’m more likely to give it a wide berth if it’s big, and definitely if it’s unleashed or unaccompanied.

I get a little tired of the sarcasm directed at the “won’t someone think of the children” comments, mine included. Does the right of a dog owner to let their dog roam free trump my wish to take my children out for a walk? Is there a moral imperative that means dogs should be allowed to wander anywhere they like, regardless of any other child or animal, or indeed adult they might encounter? Should dogs be allowed to stroll into my backyard and crap under my bedroom window? Repeatedly?

As for the guy I saw who built a little cairn of bark chips over his dog’s poo to save himself from bagging it up…well, there has to be a funny side, right?

schmeah schmeah 1:15 pm 06 Apr 12

I had friends who owned two large staffies once. The first time I met those dogs I thought they were going to jump through the door and kill me. Later I found out that one of their dogs had to be destroyed because it had killed a neighbourhood cat and dog and been generally aggressive to other animals even while on a leash.

You should have seen the scene they put on when the dog was put down .. saying things like ..’she was great with people, just didn’t like other animals you know’ and making mementos of their hideous dog. In a word, they were genuine bogans. Full sized glamour portraits that stared at you while you ate, multiple cars and too many dogs in a small yard.

That said, many years ago I knew a girl who had a small, almost mini staffy and that dog was just the most adorable, harmless thing ever; always walked and played with. So I do think responsible owners can be the difference between a harmless, but protective dog and a neighbourhood monster.

Onceler Onceler 10:55 am 06 Apr 12

Captain RAAF said :

Thirty years ago some old WW2 Vet would have heard about this, walked outside with his .303 that he carried over the Kokoda and just shot the dogs on the spot and no-one would have batted an eyelid. Everyone would have been safe, the owners would have received a visit from the plod and they would not be able to show their face down the pub for a month! Meanwhile, the Vet is getting pats on the back and free shouts at the Royal Oak for his trouble.

Apparently we’ve advanced as a society since then though and those horrible days are gone………….

Damn straight. Reminds me of something my dad told me about a farmer who ended up shooting some dogs that kept attacking his livestock. The dogs belonged to a neighbouring hobby farmer. When polite requests to keep the dogs secure had no effect, the farmer delivered the now dead dogs to his neighbour’s doorstep. Problem solved. This would have been early 1970s, NSW north coast.

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