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Politics in the Pub – Lyn White from Animals Australia

By Malteser 24 May 2012 31

I was lucky enough to attend The Australia Institute ‘Politics in the Pub’ last night at Uni Pub where Lyn White, from the organisation Animals Australia, was the guest speaker. Lyn is an animal advocate, and has received a number of media awards in the last couple of years for her work in exposing animal cruelty and neglect.

Last night Lyn spoke candidly about her interactions with Australia Government members and members of the Meat Industry. Her insight into the meat industry in Australia and overseas is eyeopening, but also realistic and a view I share. The session video will also be uploaded to the Australia Instutite’s webpage in the coming days www.tai.org.au

People are always going to eat meat. Supporting the ban of live export and the inhumane treatment of animals set for slaughter is not about being a ‘hippy’ or becoming a vegetarian – it is about ending the needless suffering animals face at our hands. It is about having the conscience and ethical values to ensure we treat defenceless animals with some dignity. It is unethical and morally reprehensible to abuse animals. To repeat Lyn’s quote by Gandhi “The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated”.

Lyn was instrumental in exposing the live export trade and the atrocities Australian animals face in slaughterhouses overseas. From the investigations, new legislation is in place that have forced the live export industry to transform itself — adhering to new rules that will make exporting live animals more expensive, more difficult and importantly, more heavily scrutinised.

However, these legislations are not good enough and are being ignored as evidenced by another investigation into an Indonesian slaughterhouse in which Australian Animals were exported and abused. It is impossible for Australia Regulations to protect our animals from abuse on foreign shores. The only way to stop the horrible abuse and suffering is to ban live export. And the only way to ban live export is to continue to keep this issue on the Government Agenda. Australians must ensure the Australian Government understand that we as a nation do not support the needless suffering of animals. We do not support outdated ways of exporting meat to other countries. We do not support inhumane treatment and cruelty towards ANY animal.

I am writing this post to encourage you to be aware of this issue and to ensure politicians in this nation know it will not go away. Animals Australia have made it very easy for us to write to MPs showing support to ban live export and other animal cruelty issues. If you go to the webpage www.animalsaustralia.org and click on the ‘Take Action’ tab, a number of simple ways to support campaigns and send petitions/emails are available.

Please help end the inhumane treatment of all animals in Australia. Please help end the largest live export trade in the world by petitioning to stop live export of Australian Animals. This will start a movement throughout the world. People no longer support and condone the abuse of animals. Take action!

Thank you

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31 Responses to
Politics in the Pub – Lyn White from Animals Australia
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aceofspades 3:02 pm 31 May 12

Malteser said :

What does a cow can live on two legs mean??

It means peal the vegies, switch on the oven and get a saw, we can have beautiful roast leg of beef guilt free. Num num num!

HenryBG 1:39 pm 31 May 12

Malteser said :

.That said, unless you live in a cave, drink from puddles or nearby rivers, and eat whatever food you can forage from the surrounding forest or capture and kill yourself, I suggest you give up on using the ‘natural’ argument.

Hey, I didn’t start the natural argument. I just don’t agree with what HBG said.

Here’s a clue:

Face a mirror. Open your mouth. Examine your teeth. All of them.
The teeth you are looking at are not the teeth of a herbivore. They are the teeth of an omnivorous species. Neurotically skipping the richest part of our species’ diet is not natural.

Malteser 1:39 pm 31 May 12

aceofspades said :

Thumper said :

Jim Jones said :

aceofspades said :

Thumper said :

Skidbladnir said :

Thumper said :

The great apes are mostly vegetarian. And they are our closest relatives evolutionary wise.

Closest surviving branch of extant relatives does not mean actual closest relative.
There’s a reason we’re a homo species, and not say, Pongo sapiens or Hybolates sapiens.
Homo sapiens immediate’ predecessor was potentially H. floresiensis, but our nearest known non-sapiens but still Homo relation was H. Neanderthalsis.

Neanderthalsis ate more meat than we did.

Yeah, I should have clarified that 🙂

However, the point still stands.

Ummm, how does the point still stand? Our closest relatives eat meat, as do we. We are omnivores and it is natural for us to be so.

Also in that terrible ‘unnatural’ category are destructive elements of modern life such as:

– treated clean running water
– flushable toilets
– household heating (with the exclusion of open fire pits) and air conditioning
– houses
– processed food (including bacon)

We don’t have to eat meat.

Simple as that.

No you don’t. You don’t have to eat fruit either but it is healthier to eat both. A cow can live on three legs anyway, maybe even two.

I don’t know aceofspades – there is a lot of evidence to suggest that it is not healthier to eat both, (meaning veg/fruit and meat) and that is actually unhealthy for us to eat meat.

What does a cow can live on two legs mean??

HenryBG 1:37 pm 31 May 12

Thumper said :

Jim Jones said :

aceofspades said :

Thumper said :

Skidbladnir said :

Thumper said :

The great apes are mostly vegetarian. And they are our closest relatives evolutionary wise.

Closest surviving branch of extant relatives does not mean actual closest relative.
There’s a reason we’re a homo species, and not say, Pongo sapiens or Hybolates sapiens.
Homo sapiens immediate’ predecessor was potentially H. floresiensis, but our nearest known non-sapiens but still Homo relation was H. Neanderthalsis.

Neanderthalsis ate more meat than we did.

Yeah, I should have clarified that 🙂

However, the point still stands.

Ummm, how does the point still stand? Our closest relatives eat meat, as do we. We are omnivores and it is natural for us to be so.

Also in that terrible ‘unnatural’ category are destructive elements of modern life such as:

– treated clean running water
– flushable toilets
– household heating (with the exclusion of open fire pits) and air conditioning
– houses
– processed food (including bacon)

We don’t have to eat meat.

Simple as that.

No, you can choose an unnatural diet which excludes meat if you like.

It’s not likely to be very good for you, as neurotic eaters suffer from all sorts of deficiencies.

Vegetarianism also causes IQ loss:
http://www.carbwire.com/2006/12/20/vegans_have_lower_iq_than_meateaters_study_shows

Thumper 1:24 pm 31 May 12

A cow can live on three legs anyway, maybe even two.

I know when I’m beaten.

aceofspades 12:50 pm 31 May 12

Thumper said :

Jim Jones said :

aceofspades said :

Thumper said :

Skidbladnir said :

Thumper said :

The great apes are mostly vegetarian. And they are our closest relatives evolutionary wise.

Closest surviving branch of extant relatives does not mean actual closest relative.
There’s a reason we’re a homo species, and not say, Pongo sapiens or Hybolates sapiens.
Homo sapiens immediate’ predecessor was potentially H. floresiensis, but our nearest known non-sapiens but still Homo relation was H. Neanderthalsis.

Neanderthalsis ate more meat than we did.

Yeah, I should have clarified that 🙂

However, the point still stands.

Ummm, how does the point still stand? Our closest relatives eat meat, as do we. We are omnivores and it is natural for us to be so.

Also in that terrible ‘unnatural’ category are destructive elements of modern life such as:

– treated clean running water
– flushable toilets
– household heating (with the exclusion of open fire pits) and air conditioning
– houses
– processed food (including bacon)

We don’t have to eat meat.

Simple as that.

No you don’t. You don’t have to eat fruit either but it is healthier to eat both. A cow can live on three legs anyway, maybe even two.

Thumper 12:12 pm 31 May 12

Jim Jones said :

aceofspades said :

Thumper said :

Skidbladnir said :

Thumper said :

The great apes are mostly vegetarian. And they are our closest relatives evolutionary wise.

Closest surviving branch of extant relatives does not mean actual closest relative.
There’s a reason we’re a homo species, and not say, Pongo sapiens or Hybolates sapiens.
Homo sapiens immediate’ predecessor was potentially H. floresiensis, but our nearest known non-sapiens but still Homo relation was H. Neanderthalsis.

Neanderthalsis ate more meat than we did.

Yeah, I should have clarified that 🙂

However, the point still stands.

Ummm, how does the point still stand? Our closest relatives eat meat, as do we. We are omnivores and it is natural for us to be so.

Also in that terrible ‘unnatural’ category are destructive elements of modern life such as:

– treated clean running water
– flushable toilets
– household heating (with the exclusion of open fire pits) and air conditioning
– houses
– processed food (including bacon)

We don’t have to eat meat.

Simple as that.

Malteser 11:56 am 31 May 12

I really cannot get this whole “QUOTE” business to work!

Malteser 11:55 am 31 May 12

.That said, unless you live in a cave, drink from puddles or nearby rivers, and eat whatever food you can forage from the surrounding forest or capture and kill yourself, I suggest you give up on using the ‘natural’ argument.

Hey, I didn’t start the natural argument. I just don’t agree with what HBG said.

Jim Jones 11:46 am 31 May 12

aceofspades said :

Thumper said :

Skidbladnir said :

Thumper said :

The great apes are mostly vegetarian. And they are our closest relatives evolutionary wise.

Closest surviving branch of extant relatives does not mean actual closest relative.
There’s a reason we’re a homo species, and not say, Pongo sapiens or Hybolates sapiens.
Homo sapiens immediate’ predecessor was potentially H. floresiensis, but our nearest known non-sapiens but still Homo relation was H. Neanderthalsis.

Neanderthalsis ate more meat than we did.

Yeah, I should have clarified that 🙂

However, the point still stands.

Ummm, how does the point still stand? Our closest relatives eat meat, as do we. We are omnivores and it is natural for us to be so.

Also in that terrible ‘unnatural’ category are destructive elements of modern life such as:

– treated clean running water
– flushable toilets
– household heating (with the exclusion of open fire pits) and air conditioning
– houses
– processed food (including bacon)

aceofspades 11:39 am 31 May 12

Malteser said :

Thumper said :

Get real. Vegetarianism is strange and unnatural

The great apes are mostly vegetarian.

And they are our closest relatives evolutionary wise.

Which suggests it is not strange and unnnatural and is normal behaviour to some degree.

I’d argue it’s not normal behaviour to SOME degree, it’s normal behaviour full stop. It is normal to eat fruits and vegetables. We couldn’t survive on a diet solely of meat. Now that would be unnatural.

I think this is going off topic a bit anyway.

I was just shocked someone would state that eating a vegetarian diet is unnatural. I agree we have evolusionised to eat meat and have been doing so for millions of years. However, because Humans eat meat, does not make eating fruits and vegetables unnatural.

No, but our diet consists of a combination of meat, fruit and vegetables. Eating solely meat is unnatural as is eating solely fruit and vegetables.

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