See Gungahlin Differently

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Have you thought about moving to Gungahlin? Photo: Region Media.

If you have a young family and are considering a move to Canberra, chances are Gungahlin is on your list of potential suburbs to live.With a lower median age relative to the rest of the ACT, the fast-growing suburb is known for its affordability, focus on family and being one of the first in Canberra to benefit from light rail.

It’s also close to kid-friendly amenities like swimming pools, Lake Ginninderra, sporting ovals and some of the most popular nature reserves in Canberra.

Thinking about visiting to moving to Gungahlin? Here’s what you need to know.

History

Gungahlin has a rich Aboriginal history that goes back at least 20,000 years. The broader Gungahlin district, of which the suburb of Gungahlin is a part, has a number of protected Aboriginal archaeological sites including tool making sites and clay pits.

The name Gungahlin is thought to be derived from the Ngunnawal people’s word for ‘white man’s house’.

And while the Gungahlin district was formally established in 1966, it wasn’t until 1991 that the Gungahlin Town Centre was developed.

Since then, the suburb of Gungahlin has become a thriving metropolitan hub with over 6000 residents and a bustling town centre.

The BookFace in Gungahlin is one of the stores at Gungahlin’s bustling town centre. Photo: Daniella Jukic, We Are Found.

Shops and eateries

Gungahlin Town Centre’s main street is Hibberson Street, and that’s where you’ll find many of the suburb’s shops and eateries, including Marketplace Gungahlin and Gungahlin Village.

When it comes to food, locals recommend Cornerstone Café and Bar for its friendly staff and great food, and bubble tea outlet Cha Time.

Iconic snack van The G Spot, which you’ll find in the Gungahlin Lakes Golf Club car park, serves up treats including deep fried mars bars, burgers and late night chips and gravy. In addition to being Canberra’s longest-standing food truck, The G Spot is a proud and active supporter of the local community. It regularly raises funds for important causes like bushfire relief.

Olivia and Bret from Krofne serving delicious sweet treats. Photo: Daniella Jukic, We Are Found.

Places of interest and things to do

Here are some of our favourite activities in and around Gungahlin:

  • Test your fitness at the Gungahlin Parkrun. Gungahlin Parkrun is a free, weekly 5km timed run that takes place every Saturday at 8am at Yerrabi Pond. You don’t have to be a seasoned athlete to join in – runners of all fitness levels are welcome.
  • Go for a dip at Gungahlin Leisure Centre. Community recreation and aquatic centre Gungahlin Leisure Centre has a 50m indoor pool, a health club, creche, café and free parking. It’s great for swimming laps or splashing around with the kids.
  • Take your car for a wash. This might seem like an odd suggestion but bear with us. On weekends, the huge Waves Car Wash in O’Brien Place is almost always packed. People love it. Head down on a Saturday morning and find out what all the fuss is about.

Buy someone special (or yourself?) a beautiful bouquet from Poetry in Flowers in Gungahlin. Photo: Daniella Jukic, We Are Found.

Playgrounds and parks

There are two main outdoor areas of interest in the suburb of Gungahlin:

  • Yerrabi Pond District Park (Wunderlich Street). More than just a lovely spot for a picnic or barbeque, Yerrabi Pond District Park is also great for kids. It has a shaded playground, flying fox, skate park and basketball courts.
  • Mulanggari Grassland Nature Reserve (access from Gungahlin Drive). Mulanggari Grassland is a grassland reserve with walking and equestrian trails. Keep an eye out for wildflowers in the spring, kangaroos and maybe even a nationally vulnerable striped legless lizard.

Getting around

Light rail departs towards the City from Gungahlin Place, which has gone some way towards alleviating traffic congestion in and out of Gungahlin during peak times.

See Gungahlin Differently

The light rail departs towards the City from Gungahlin Place. Photo: Region Media.

That said, there are a few roads out of Gungahlin. These include Flemington Road from Mitchell/Harrison; Tuggeranong Parkway via Palmerston/Mitchell; and Horsepark Drive, which takes you to Costco and IKEA.

There are also multiple bus services from Gungahlin Place to Civic, Dickson and other suburbs in the Gungahlin district.

Schools

As a fast-growing district, Gungahlin residents are spoiled for choice when it comes to schools. There are more than 15 schools in the Gungahlin area, including two in the actual suburb of Gungahlin.

Gungahlin College is a public college for students in Years 10 to 12. It’s located on Gozzard Street in the heart of the Gungahlin Town Centre.

Burgmann Anglican School is a co-educational independent school for preschool to Year 12. Its Valley Avenue campus in Gungahlin caters to preschool to Year 5, and Year 9 to 12.

Other nearby schools include Good Shepherd Primary School in Amaroo (Catholic primary school), Ngunnawal Primary School (public primary school), Amaroo School (public primary and high school), Gold Creek School (public primary and high school), and Harrison School.

Why the locals love it

See Gungahlin differently

Tristen the barista at Atlas loves serving coffees in the morning. Photo: Daniella Jukic, We Are Found.

“Gungahlin has a real community feel to it. There are lots of outdoor areas to take the kids, the local shops have everything you need in the one place, and it’s easy to get into the city with the light rail.” – Elise, 25.

Quick facts

  • Median age: 31 years
  • Median weekly household income: $2066
  • Median weekly rent: $380
  • Houses vs. apartments: 21.1% apartments; 39.1% semi-detached houses (i.e. townhouses/terrace house); 39.6% separate houses.
  • Suburb sales record: $1.25 million for a four-bedroom, three-bathroom home in 2016

Source: 2016 Census.

Want to find the latest real estate listings for sale and rent in Gungahlin? Zango can help you find them:

Do you live, or have you previously lived, in Gungahlin? What are your favourite things about the suburb? What advice would you give to people considering moving there? Share your thoughts in the comments below.


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80 Responses to See Gungahlin Differently
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dungfungus dungfungus 9:24 pm 02 Mar 16

dungfungus said :

bj_ACT said :

dungfungus said :

bj_ACT said :

dungfungus said :

Postalgeek said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

Charlotte Harper said :

All good points (especially the one about garden maintenance). As for why people like big back yards, here are a few reasons I can think of off the top of my head: so the dog has space to run around, so the family can play backyard cricket, so there can be trees with shade to sit under, so the kids can play under the sprinklers in summer, for camping practice runs, for kids’ birthday party games, so you can dry the washing on a Hills Hoist which is so much more effective than a wall line, so you can have a veggie patch, so the kids can have a small patch of garden to grow plants of their choice, so you can grow herbs and fruit trees as well as flowers.

It is how you use the space that matters not how big it is.

My current home, 15 years old the block is 500m2. We have an 110m2 house+double garage and 20m2 deck. Our garden has 15 rose bushes, an apple tree, 3 citrus tree’s, a 3x5m vegie patch and a border garden in the back yard of natives and 250m2 of grass for the kids to run around and play on and did I mention a rotry clothes line.

We are building a new house also on a 500m2 block, that will have an even bigger back yard. Done by having a double story house, meaning the ground footprint is slightly less than the current house, but overall house size 75% bigger. The new house is sited reasonably close to the foot path (about 5m) but being a cul-de-sac road noise won’t be an issue. Hence the back yard will be about 50% bigger than out existing one, which is more than enough for 2 kids aged 4 and 5.

But I do recognise that even this isn’t enough for everyone, so don’t begrudge anyway who wants the older style 800+ blocks. The point I have been making is just because some want that doesn’t mean that everyone else is being forced into it by the government. Look around the country and indeed the world and smaller is where people are heading. So IMO planning is reflective of modern day standards as opposed to some big conspiracy to make more money for the government and developers.

Sounds like you are building another MacMansion in Gungahlin.

I am, made not secret of the fact either in other threads over the past few months. The house and the amenities of the area will suit my families needs perfectly and as mentioned above we will still have the same if not more usable land for our vegie patch, fruit trees and a reasonable amount of lawn for the kids to play on including room for a rotary hoist. Though hope the kids don’t do to that what I did to my mums, new ones these days are not as strong!

And plus I will still be closer to the city than 90% of Tuggeranong (Only parts of Kambah are closer), though for us the light rail won’t be a viable option, but think I’ve mentioned this before the light rail is there mainly to service the Flemmington Road/Northborne Ave corridor rather than the entire township of Gungahlin. Though I might be moving to work in the city soon, so on a cost rather than time basis using the EPIC Park and Ride might be a good option.

90% of Tuggeranongites have no desire to travel to the city anyhow.

That is fairly obvious and explains the insular nature of many down that way. Maybe they should get out a bit more, and they might realise they are not getting as short changed as they THINK they are.

90% of Tuggerangongites have no need to travel to the city anyhow.

I would dispute the “no need to travel to the city” comment. As someone who has lived in Tuggeranong her whole life, I don’t work in the City but I do travel in at least twice a week. The shopping is better and the restaurants allow for more choice than those at the Hyperdome or Woden Plaza, and there are cheaper options than at Kingston or Manuka.

You couldn’t pay me enough to live in a McMansion in Gungahlin. I’d rather an older house with character and no restrictive covenants than in a huge, painted concrete house with a defaults list as long as my arm. It’s not about the backyards either. But then, while I am a young professional, I don’t have kids so I’m not in the target demographic for those looking to buy out there.

No need to dispute that as I said “90%” have no need to travel to Civic.
You are one of the remaining 10%.

Thank you, but I don’t flatter myself that I am in the minority of people who live in Tuggeranong.

Furthermore, by the logic that 90% of people from the dirty south have no need to go to the City, would that not also go for people in Belconnen or Gungahlin? How is the “need” defined? Surely with all of the infrastructure and shops in the far north, most people might like to go to the City every so often, but they don’t need to. Why is Tuggeranong receiving the brunt of the blockage from Civic?

Why are you even debating his ‘90%’? Unless he actually provides some actual evidence, it can be safely assumed he’s pulled a figure out of nowhere (to be polite) and is passing off his opinion as a stat.

You have a point there. Use of percentages does baffle some people.
So there is no further misunderstaning I declare that 9 out of 10 Tuggeranonites have no reason to travel to Civic.

No I think it is your claim that 90% (or 9 out of 10) people from Tuggeranong don’t travel to Civic claim – that people are actually questioning.

According to ABS Journey to Work data from the CENSUS, 28% of Tuggeranong workers travel to Civic and nearby surrounds each workday. This number doesn’t include the students and other residents going to ANU, shops, restaurants, cinemas, etc etc

So where do you get your 9 out of 10 Tuggeranong residents don’t go to Civic claim?

How many people make up “28% of Tuggeranong workers”?

17,433 people according to the last CENSUS Working Population, however, I would reduce this number a bit to take account of those who are currently stay at home mums, students and Unemployed. However this Journey To Work number also excludes, tradies, contractors, school age students and elderly who have to go to Civic so that may bump it back up a little.

ANU has 20,000 students alone (not all on Campus) and Civic and surrounds has about 65-70,000 regular workers, plus all the tradies, consultants etc who do not have regular office sites there. Considering the Tuggeranong population is just below a quarter of the ACTs total population, but a larger proportion of the Working Age Population these numbers roughly make sense.

I think you are trying to muddy the water to increase the ratio above 10%.
If you are correct in those workforce numbers that means 62,260 residents of Tuggeranong are “workers” (seems very high number to me) and 17,433 of them work in Civic. Let’s adjust that figure down one sixth for reality as most would be public servants who only work 10 months of every year when leave/sickies/etc. are factored in so they don’t travel on those days.
This leaves about 14,500 and while you are correct that ANU has 20,000 students most of them are foreign and I doubt if any live in Tuggeranong due to the distance from the campus.
So, lets say that the 14,500 odd are joined by some others to make 15,000 a day travelling to Civic and as 100,000 people are resident in Tuggeranong then 15% of them travel to Civic every day.
Clearly I was very wrong so I apologise again for exaggerating.

Can you provide a link where you got the figure for the the numbers of workers resident in Tuggereanong because my research with ABS says the labour force in 2011 was 51,396.

madelini madelini 3:26 pm 02 Mar 16

Maya123 said :

madelini said :

Maya123 said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

90% of Tuggerangongites have no need to travel to the city anyhow.

I would dispute the “no need to travel to the city” comment. As someone who has lived in Tuggeranong her whole life, I don’t work in the City but I do travel in at least twice a week. The shopping is better and the restaurants allow for more choice than those at the Hyperdome or Woden Plaza, and there are cheaper options than at Kingston or Manuka.

You couldn’t pay me enough to live in a McMansion in Gungahlin. I’d rather an older house with character and no restrictive covenants than in a huge, painted concrete house with a defaults list as long as my arm. It’s not about the backyards either. But then, while I am a young professional, I don’t have kids so I’m not in the target demographic for those looking to buy out there.

Twice a week for shopping and restaurants! That’s a choice, not a need. And an expensive choice.

Forgive me if I, like many other people, choose to enjoy the best offerings of our city than the Coffee Club at the Hyperdome. Or, are those aspects just for the privileged few who earn above $80k/annum and live in a 12km radius of the City Centre? Some of us are also not lucky enough to have all friends and family living in the same part of Canberra, but still enjoy being able to catch up in person.

Some things are worth the slight increase in expense.

As I said, a choice not a need. I live within 12kms of the city centre and don’t go to civic twice a week. I would likely go less than once a month. I also can’t afford to eat out twice a week, and my income I would guess, if you can afford to eat out twice a week, is much lower than yours; certainly much lower than “$80k/annum”.

By that logic, no one aside from the people who live in Acton, Reid and Braddon (the end not near the supermarket) would ever “need” to go into the City. To experience Canberra and what it has to offer (including night life, events such as the Multicultural Festival and performances at any of the theatres), or as a more centralised place in which to meet friends and family, then most people – even those living at the fringes – do “need” to go to the City to contribute to their enjoyment and quality of life.

Perhaps if you lived further out than within the 12km radius, you would also be able to afford to go out and enjoy the social aspects of the city centre?

Maya123 Maya123 12:44 pm 02 Mar 16

madelini said :

Maya123 said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

Charlotte Harper said :

All good points (especially the one about garden maintenance). As for why people like big back yards, here are a few reasons I can think of off the top of my head: so the dog has space to run around, so the family can play backyard cricket, so there can be trees with shade to sit under, so the kids can play under the sprinklers in summer, for camping practice runs, for kids’ birthday party games, so you can dry the washing on a Hills Hoist which is so much more effective than a wall line, so you can have a veggie patch, so the kids can have a small patch of garden to grow plants of their choice, so you can grow herbs and fruit trees as well as flowers.

It is how you use the space that matters not how big it is.

My current home, 15 years old the block is 500m2. We have an 110m2 house+double garage and 20m2 deck. Our garden has 15 rose bushes, an apple tree, 3 citrus tree’s, a 3x5m vegie patch and a border garden in the back yard of natives and 250m2 of grass for the kids to run around and play on and did I mention a rotry clothes line.

We are building a new house also on a 500m2 block, that will have an even bigger back yard. Done by having a double story house, meaning the ground footprint is slightly less than the current house, but overall house size 75% bigger. The new house is sited reasonably close to the foot path (about 5m) but being a cul-de-sac road noise won’t be an issue. Hence the back yard will be about 50% bigger than out existing one, which is more than enough for 2 kids aged 4 and 5.

But I do recognise that even this isn’t enough for everyone, so don’t begrudge anyway who wants the older style 800+ blocks. The point I have been making is just because some want that doesn’t mean that everyone else is being forced into it by the government. Look around the country and indeed the world and smaller is where people are heading. So IMO planning is reflective of modern day standards as opposed to some big conspiracy to make more money for the government and developers.

Sounds like you are building another MacMansion in Gungahlin.

I am, made not secret of the fact either in other threads over the past few months. The house and the amenities of the area will suit my families needs perfectly and as mentioned above we will still have the same if not more usable land for our vegie patch, fruit trees and a reasonable amount of lawn for the kids to play on including room for a rotary hoist. Though hope the kids don’t do to that what I did to my mums, new ones these days are not as strong!

And plus I will still be closer to the city than 90% of Tuggeranong (Only parts of Kambah are closer), though for us the light rail won’t be a viable option, but think I’ve mentioned this before the light rail is there mainly to service the Flemmington Road/Northborne Ave corridor rather than the entire township of Gungahlin. Though I might be moving to work in the city soon, so on a cost rather than time basis using the EPIC Park and Ride might be a good option.

90% of Tuggeranongites have no desire to travel to the city anyhow.

That is fairly obvious and explains the insular nature of many down that way. Maybe they should get out a bit more, and they might realise they are not getting as short changed as they THINK they are.

90% of Tuggerangongites have no need to travel to the city anyhow.

I would dispute the “no need to travel to the city” comment. As someone who has lived in Tuggeranong her whole life, I don’t work in the City but I do travel in at least twice a week. The shopping is better and the restaurants allow for more choice than those at the Hyperdome or Woden Plaza, and there are cheaper options than at Kingston or Manuka.

You couldn’t pay me enough to live in a McMansion in Gungahlin. I’d rather an older house with character and no restrictive covenants than in a huge, painted concrete house with a defaults list as long as my arm. It’s not about the backyards either. But then, while I am a young professional, I don’t have kids so I’m not in the target demographic for those looking to buy out there.

Twice a week for shopping and restaurants! That’s a choice, not a need. And an expensive choice.

Forgive me if I, like many other people, choose to enjoy the best offerings of our city than the Coffee Club at the Hyperdome. Or, are those aspects just for the privileged few who earn above $80k/annum and live in a 12km radius of the City Centre? Some of us are also not lucky enough to have all friends and family living in the same part of Canberra, but still enjoy being able to catch up in person.

Some things are worth the slight increase in expense.

As I said, a choice not a need. I live within 12kms of the city centre and don’t go to civic twice a week. I would likely go less than once a month. I also can’t afford to eat out twice a week, and my income I would guess, if you can afford to eat out twice a week, is much lower than yours; certainly much lower than “$80k/annum”.

dungfungus dungfungus 12:19 pm 02 Mar 16

bj_ACT said :

dungfungus said :

bj_ACT said :

dungfungus said :

Postalgeek said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

Charlotte Harper said :

All good points (especially the one about garden maintenance). As for why people like big back yards, here are a few reasons I can think of off the top of my head: so the dog has space to run around, so the family can play backyard cricket, so there can be trees with shade to sit under, so the kids can play under the sprinklers in summer, for camping practice runs, for kids’ birthday party games, so you can dry the washing on a Hills Hoist which is so much more effective than a wall line, so you can have a veggie patch, so the kids can have a small patch of garden to grow plants of their choice, so you can grow herbs and fruit trees as well as flowers.

It is how you use the space that matters not how big it is.

My current home, 15 years old the block is 500m2. We have an 110m2 house+double garage and 20m2 deck. Our garden has 15 rose bushes, an apple tree, 3 citrus tree’s, a 3x5m vegie patch and a border garden in the back yard of natives and 250m2 of grass for the kids to run around and play on and did I mention a rotry clothes line.

We are building a new house also on a 500m2 block, that will have an even bigger back yard. Done by having a double story house, meaning the ground footprint is slightly less than the current house, but overall house size 75% bigger. The new house is sited reasonably close to the foot path (about 5m) but being a cul-de-sac road noise won’t be an issue. Hence the back yard will be about 50% bigger than out existing one, which is more than enough for 2 kids aged 4 and 5.

But I do recognise that even this isn’t enough for everyone, so don’t begrudge anyway who wants the older style 800+ blocks. The point I have been making is just because some want that doesn’t mean that everyone else is being forced into it by the government. Look around the country and indeed the world and smaller is where people are heading. So IMO planning is reflective of modern day standards as opposed to some big conspiracy to make more money for the government and developers.

Sounds like you are building another MacMansion in Gungahlin.

I am, made not secret of the fact either in other threads over the past few months. The house and the amenities of the area will suit my families needs perfectly and as mentioned above we will still have the same if not more usable land for our vegie patch, fruit trees and a reasonable amount of lawn for the kids to play on including room for a rotary hoist. Though hope the kids don’t do to that what I did to my mums, new ones these days are not as strong!

And plus I will still be closer to the city than 90% of Tuggeranong (Only parts of Kambah are closer), though for us the light rail won’t be a viable option, but think I’ve mentioned this before the light rail is there mainly to service the Flemmington Road/Northborne Ave corridor rather than the entire township of Gungahlin. Though I might be moving to work in the city soon, so on a cost rather than time basis using the EPIC Park and Ride might be a good option.

90% of Tuggeranongites have no desire to travel to the city anyhow.

That is fairly obvious and explains the insular nature of many down that way. Maybe they should get out a bit more, and they might realise they are not getting as short changed as they THINK they are.

90% of Tuggerangongites have no need to travel to the city anyhow.

I would dispute the “no need to travel to the city” comment. As someone who has lived in Tuggeranong her whole life, I don’t work in the City but I do travel in at least twice a week. The shopping is better and the restaurants allow for more choice than those at the Hyperdome or Woden Plaza, and there are cheaper options than at Kingston or Manuka.

You couldn’t pay me enough to live in a McMansion in Gungahlin. I’d rather an older house with character and no restrictive covenants than in a huge, painted concrete house with a defaults list as long as my arm. It’s not about the backyards either. But then, while I am a young professional, I don’t have kids so I’m not in the target demographic for those looking to buy out there.

No need to dispute that as I said “90%” have no need to travel to Civic.
You are one of the remaining 10%.

Thank you, but I don’t flatter myself that I am in the minority of people who live in Tuggeranong.

Furthermore, by the logic that 90% of people from the dirty south have no need to go to the City, would that not also go for people in Belconnen or Gungahlin? How is the “need” defined? Surely with all of the infrastructure and shops in the far north, most people might like to go to the City every so often, but they don’t need to. Why is Tuggeranong receiving the brunt of the blockage from Civic?

Why are you even debating his ‘90%’? Unless he actually provides some actual evidence, it can be safely assumed he’s pulled a figure out of nowhere (to be polite) and is passing off his opinion as a stat.

You have a point there. Use of percentages does baffle some people.
So there is no further misunderstaning I declare that 9 out of 10 Tuggeranonites have no reason to travel to Civic.

No I think it is your claim that 90% (or 9 out of 10) people from Tuggeranong don’t travel to Civic claim – that people are actually questioning.

According to ABS Journey to Work data from the CENSUS, 28% of Tuggeranong workers travel to Civic and nearby surrounds each workday. This number doesn’t include the students and other residents going to ANU, shops, restaurants, cinemas, etc etc

So where do you get your 9 out of 10 Tuggeranong residents don’t go to Civic claim?

How many people make up “28% of Tuggeranong workers”?

17,433 people according to the last CENSUS Working Population, however, I would reduce this number a bit to take account of those who are currently stay at home mums, students and Unemployed. However this Journey To Work number also excludes, tradies, contractors, school age students and elderly who have to go to Civic so that may bump it back up a little.

ANU has 20,000 students alone (not all on Campus) and Civic and surrounds has about 65-70,000 regular workers, plus all the tradies, consultants etc who do not have regular office sites there. Considering the Tuggeranong population is just below a quarter of the ACTs total population, but a larger proportion of the Working Age Population these numbers roughly make sense.

I think you are trying to muddy the water to increase the ratio above 10%.
If you are correct in those workforce numbers that means 62,260 residents of Tuggeranong are “workers” (seems very high number to me) and 17,433 of them work in Civic. Let’s adjust that figure down one sixth for reality as most would be public servants who only work 10 months of every year when leave/sickies/etc. are factored in so they don’t travel on those days.
This leaves about 14,500 and while you are correct that ANU has 20,000 students most of them are foreign and I doubt if any live in Tuggeranong due to the distance from the campus.
So, lets say that the 14,500 odd are joined by some others to make 15,000 a day travelling to Civic and as 100,000 people are resident in Tuggeranong then 15% of them travel to Civic every day.
Clearly I was very wrong so I apologise again for exaggerating.

bj_ACT bj_ACT 10:32 am 02 Mar 16

dungfungus said :

bj_ACT said :

dungfungus said :

Postalgeek said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

Charlotte Harper said :

All good points (especially the one about garden maintenance). As for why people like big back yards, here are a few reasons I can think of off the top of my head: so the dog has space to run around, so the family can play backyard cricket, so there can be trees with shade to sit under, so the kids can play under the sprinklers in summer, for camping practice runs, for kids’ birthday party games, so you can dry the washing on a Hills Hoist which is so much more effective than a wall line, so you can have a veggie patch, so the kids can have a small patch of garden to grow plants of their choice, so you can grow herbs and fruit trees as well as flowers.

It is how you use the space that matters not how big it is.

My current home, 15 years old the block is 500m2. We have an 110m2 house+double garage and 20m2 deck. Our garden has 15 rose bushes, an apple tree, 3 citrus tree’s, a 3x5m vegie patch and a border garden in the back yard of natives and 250m2 of grass for the kids to run around and play on and did I mention a rotry clothes line.

We are building a new house also on a 500m2 block, that will have an even bigger back yard. Done by having a double story house, meaning the ground footprint is slightly less than the current house, but overall house size 75% bigger. The new house is sited reasonably close to the foot path (about 5m) but being a cul-de-sac road noise won’t be an issue. Hence the back yard will be about 50% bigger than out existing one, which is more than enough for 2 kids aged 4 and 5.

But I do recognise that even this isn’t enough for everyone, so don’t begrudge anyway who wants the older style 800+ blocks. The point I have been making is just because some want that doesn’t mean that everyone else is being forced into it by the government. Look around the country and indeed the world and smaller is where people are heading. So IMO planning is reflective of modern day standards as opposed to some big conspiracy to make more money for the government and developers.

Sounds like you are building another MacMansion in Gungahlin.

I am, made not secret of the fact either in other threads over the past few months. The house and the amenities of the area will suit my families needs perfectly and as mentioned above we will still have the same if not more usable land for our vegie patch, fruit trees and a reasonable amount of lawn for the kids to play on including room for a rotary hoist. Though hope the kids don’t do to that what I did to my mums, new ones these days are not as strong!

And plus I will still be closer to the city than 90% of Tuggeranong (Only parts of Kambah are closer), though for us the light rail won’t be a viable option, but think I’ve mentioned this before the light rail is there mainly to service the Flemmington Road/Northborne Ave corridor rather than the entire township of Gungahlin. Though I might be moving to work in the city soon, so on a cost rather than time basis using the EPIC Park and Ride might be a good option.

90% of Tuggeranongites have no desire to travel to the city anyhow.

That is fairly obvious and explains the insular nature of many down that way. Maybe they should get out a bit more, and they might realise they are not getting as short changed as they THINK they are.

90% of Tuggerangongites have no need to travel to the city anyhow.

I would dispute the “no need to travel to the city” comment. As someone who has lived in Tuggeranong her whole life, I don’t work in the City but I do travel in at least twice a week. The shopping is better and the restaurants allow for more choice than those at the Hyperdome or Woden Plaza, and there are cheaper options than at Kingston or Manuka.

You couldn’t pay me enough to live in a McMansion in Gungahlin. I’d rather an older house with character and no restrictive covenants than in a huge, painted concrete house with a defaults list as long as my arm. It’s not about the backyards either. But then, while I am a young professional, I don’t have kids so I’m not in the target demographic for those looking to buy out there.

No need to dispute that as I said “90%” have no need to travel to Civic.
You are one of the remaining 10%.

Thank you, but I don’t flatter myself that I am in the minority of people who live in Tuggeranong.

Furthermore, by the logic that 90% of people from the dirty south have no need to go to the City, would that not also go for people in Belconnen or Gungahlin? How is the “need” defined? Surely with all of the infrastructure and shops in the far north, most people might like to go to the City every so often, but they don’t need to. Why is Tuggeranong receiving the brunt of the blockage from Civic?

Why are you even debating his ‘90%’? Unless he actually provides some actual evidence, it can be safely assumed he’s pulled a figure out of nowhere (to be polite) and is passing off his opinion as a stat.

You have a point there. Use of percentages does baffle some people.
So there is no further misunderstaning I declare that 9 out of 10 Tuggeranonites have no reason to travel to Civic.

No I think it is your claim that 90% (or 9 out of 10) people from Tuggeranong don’t travel to Civic claim – that people are actually questioning.

According to ABS Journey to Work data from the CENSUS, 28% of Tuggeranong workers travel to Civic and nearby surrounds each workday. This number doesn’t include the students and other residents going to ANU, shops, restaurants, cinemas, etc etc

So where do you get your 9 out of 10 Tuggeranong residents don’t go to Civic claim?

How many people make up “28% of Tuggeranong workers”?

17,433 people according to the last CENSUS Working Population, however, I would reduce this number a bit to take account of those who are currently stay at home mums, students and Unemployed. However this Journey To Work number also excludes, tradies, contractors, school age students and elderly who have to go to Civic so that may bump it back up a little.

ANU has 20,000 students alone (not all on Campus) and Civic and surrounds has about 65-70,000 regular workers, plus all the tradies, consultants etc who do not have regular office sites there. Considering the Tuggeranong population is just below a quarter of the ACTs total population, but a larger proportion of the Working Age Population these numbers roughly make sense.

dungfungus dungfungus 8:10 am 02 Mar 16

bj_ACT said :

dungfungus said :

Postalgeek said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

Charlotte Harper said :

All good points (especially the one about garden maintenance). As for why people like big back yards, here are a few reasons I can think of off the top of my head: so the dog has space to run around, so the family can play backyard cricket, so there can be trees with shade to sit under, so the kids can play under the sprinklers in summer, for camping practice runs, for kids’ birthday party games, so you can dry the washing on a Hills Hoist which is so much more effective than a wall line, so you can have a veggie patch, so the kids can have a small patch of garden to grow plants of their choice, so you can grow herbs and fruit trees as well as flowers.

It is how you use the space that matters not how big it is.

My current home, 15 years old the block is 500m2. We have an 110m2 house+double garage and 20m2 deck. Our garden has 15 rose bushes, an apple tree, 3 citrus tree’s, a 3x5m vegie patch and a border garden in the back yard of natives and 250m2 of grass for the kids to run around and play on and did I mention a rotry clothes line.

We are building a new house also on a 500m2 block, that will have an even bigger back yard. Done by having a double story house, meaning the ground footprint is slightly less than the current house, but overall house size 75% bigger. The new house is sited reasonably close to the foot path (about 5m) but being a cul-de-sac road noise won’t be an issue. Hence the back yard will be about 50% bigger than out existing one, which is more than enough for 2 kids aged 4 and 5.

But I do recognise that even this isn’t enough for everyone, so don’t begrudge anyway who wants the older style 800+ blocks. The point I have been making is just because some want that doesn’t mean that everyone else is being forced into it by the government. Look around the country and indeed the world and smaller is where people are heading. So IMO planning is reflective of modern day standards as opposed to some big conspiracy to make more money for the government and developers.

Sounds like you are building another MacMansion in Gungahlin.

I am, made not secret of the fact either in other threads over the past few months. The house and the amenities of the area will suit my families needs perfectly and as mentioned above we will still have the same if not more usable land for our vegie patch, fruit trees and a reasonable amount of lawn for the kids to play on including room for a rotary hoist. Though hope the kids don’t do to that what I did to my mums, new ones these days are not as strong!

And plus I will still be closer to the city than 90% of Tuggeranong (Only parts of Kambah are closer), though for us the light rail won’t be a viable option, but think I’ve mentioned this before the light rail is there mainly to service the Flemmington Road/Northborne Ave corridor rather than the entire township of Gungahlin. Though I might be moving to work in the city soon, so on a cost rather than time basis using the EPIC Park and Ride might be a good option.

90% of Tuggeranongites have no desire to travel to the city anyhow.

That is fairly obvious and explains the insular nature of many down that way. Maybe they should get out a bit more, and they might realise they are not getting as short changed as they THINK they are.

90% of Tuggerangongites have no need to travel to the city anyhow.

I would dispute the “no need to travel to the city” comment. As someone who has lived in Tuggeranong her whole life, I don’t work in the City but I do travel in at least twice a week. The shopping is better and the restaurants allow for more choice than those at the Hyperdome or Woden Plaza, and there are cheaper options than at Kingston or Manuka.

You couldn’t pay me enough to live in a McMansion in Gungahlin. I’d rather an older house with character and no restrictive covenants than in a huge, painted concrete house with a defaults list as long as my arm. It’s not about the backyards either. But then, while I am a young professional, I don’t have kids so I’m not in the target demographic for those looking to buy out there.

No need to dispute that as I said “90%” have no need to travel to Civic.
You are one of the remaining 10%.

Thank you, but I don’t flatter myself that I am in the minority of people who live in Tuggeranong.

Furthermore, by the logic that 90% of people from the dirty south have no need to go to the City, would that not also go for people in Belconnen or Gungahlin? How is the “need” defined? Surely with all of the infrastructure and shops in the far north, most people might like to go to the City every so often, but they don’t need to. Why is Tuggeranong receiving the brunt of the blockage from Civic?

Why are you even debating his ‘90%’? Unless he actually provides some actual evidence, it can be safely assumed he’s pulled a figure out of nowhere (to be polite) and is passing off his opinion as a stat.

You have a point there. Use of percentages does baffle some people.
So there is no further misunderstaning I declare that 9 out of 10 Tuggeranonites have no reason to travel to Civic.

No I think it is your claim that 90% (or 9 out of 10) people from Tuggeranong don’t travel to Civic claim – that people are actually questioning.

According to ABS Journey to Work data from the CENSUS, 28% of Tuggeranong workers travel to Civic and nearby surrounds each workday. This number doesn’t include the students and other residents going to ANU, shops, restaurants, cinemas, etc etc

So where do you get your 9 out of 10 Tuggeranong residents don’t go to Civic claim?

How many people make up “28% of Tuggeranong workers”?

bj_ACT bj_ACT 5:30 pm 01 Mar 16

dungfungus said :

Postalgeek said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

Charlotte Harper said :

All good points (especially the one about garden maintenance). As for why people like big back yards, here are a few reasons I can think of off the top of my head: so the dog has space to run around, so the family can play backyard cricket, so there can be trees with shade to sit under, so the kids can play under the sprinklers in summer, for camping practice runs, for kids’ birthday party games, so you can dry the washing on a Hills Hoist which is so much more effective than a wall line, so you can have a veggie patch, so the kids can have a small patch of garden to grow plants of their choice, so you can grow herbs and fruit trees as well as flowers.

It is how you use the space that matters not how big it is.

My current home, 15 years old the block is 500m2. We have an 110m2 house+double garage and 20m2 deck. Our garden has 15 rose bushes, an apple tree, 3 citrus tree’s, a 3x5m vegie patch and a border garden in the back yard of natives and 250m2 of grass for the kids to run around and play on and did I mention a rotry clothes line.

We are building a new house also on a 500m2 block, that will have an even bigger back yard. Done by having a double story house, meaning the ground footprint is slightly less than the current house, but overall house size 75% bigger. The new house is sited reasonably close to the foot path (about 5m) but being a cul-de-sac road noise won’t be an issue. Hence the back yard will be about 50% bigger than out existing one, which is more than enough for 2 kids aged 4 and 5.

But I do recognise that even this isn’t enough for everyone, so don’t begrudge anyway who wants the older style 800+ blocks. The point I have been making is just because some want that doesn’t mean that everyone else is being forced into it by the government. Look around the country and indeed the world and smaller is where people are heading. So IMO planning is reflective of modern day standards as opposed to some big conspiracy to make more money for the government and developers.

Sounds like you are building another MacMansion in Gungahlin.

I am, made not secret of the fact either in other threads over the past few months. The house and the amenities of the area will suit my families needs perfectly and as mentioned above we will still have the same if not more usable land for our vegie patch, fruit trees and a reasonable amount of lawn for the kids to play on including room for a rotary hoist. Though hope the kids don’t do to that what I did to my mums, new ones these days are not as strong!

And plus I will still be closer to the city than 90% of Tuggeranong (Only parts of Kambah are closer), though for us the light rail won’t be a viable option, but think I’ve mentioned this before the light rail is there mainly to service the Flemmington Road/Northborne Ave corridor rather than the entire township of Gungahlin. Though I might be moving to work in the city soon, so on a cost rather than time basis using the EPIC Park and Ride might be a good option.

90% of Tuggeranongites have no desire to travel to the city anyhow.

That is fairly obvious and explains the insular nature of many down that way. Maybe they should get out a bit more, and they might realise they are not getting as short changed as they THINK they are.

90% of Tuggerangongites have no need to travel to the city anyhow.

I would dispute the “no need to travel to the city” comment. As someone who has lived in Tuggeranong her whole life, I don’t work in the City but I do travel in at least twice a week. The shopping is better and the restaurants allow for more choice than those at the Hyperdome or Woden Plaza, and there are cheaper options than at Kingston or Manuka.

You couldn’t pay me enough to live in a McMansion in Gungahlin. I’d rather an older house with character and no restrictive covenants than in a huge, painted concrete house with a defaults list as long as my arm. It’s not about the backyards either. But then, while I am a young professional, I don’t have kids so I’m not in the target demographic for those looking to buy out there.

No need to dispute that as I said “90%” have no need to travel to Civic.
You are one of the remaining 10%.

Thank you, but I don’t flatter myself that I am in the minority of people who live in Tuggeranong.

Furthermore, by the logic that 90% of people from the dirty south have no need to go to the City, would that not also go for people in Belconnen or Gungahlin? How is the “need” defined? Surely with all of the infrastructure and shops in the far north, most people might like to go to the City every so often, but they don’t need to. Why is Tuggeranong receiving the brunt of the blockage from Civic?

Why are you even debating his ‘90%’? Unless he actually provides some actual evidence, it can be safely assumed he’s pulled a figure out of nowhere (to be polite) and is passing off his opinion as a stat.

You have a point there. Use of percentages does baffle some people.
So there is no further misunderstaning I declare that 9 out of 10 Tuggeranonites have no reason to travel to Civic.

No I think it is your claim that 90% (or 9 out of 10) people from Tuggeranong don’t travel to Civic claim – that people are actually questioning.

According to ABS Journey to Work data from the CENSUS, 28% of Tuggeranong workers travel to Civic and nearby surrounds each workday. This number doesn’t include the students and other residents going to ANU, shops, restaurants, cinemas, etc etc

So where do you get your 9 out of 10 Tuggeranong residents don’t go to Civic claim?

dungfungus dungfungus 1:24 pm 01 Mar 16

Postalgeek said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

Charlotte Harper said :

All good points (especially the one about garden maintenance). As for why people like big back yards, here are a few reasons I can think of off the top of my head: so the dog has space to run around, so the family can play backyard cricket, so there can be trees with shade to sit under, so the kids can play under the sprinklers in summer, for camping practice runs, for kids’ birthday party games, so you can dry the washing on a Hills Hoist which is so much more effective than a wall line, so you can have a veggie patch, so the kids can have a small patch of garden to grow plants of their choice, so you can grow herbs and fruit trees as well as flowers.

It is how you use the space that matters not how big it is.

My current home, 15 years old the block is 500m2. We have an 110m2 house+double garage and 20m2 deck. Our garden has 15 rose bushes, an apple tree, 3 citrus tree’s, a 3x5m vegie patch and a border garden in the back yard of natives and 250m2 of grass for the kids to run around and play on and did I mention a rotry clothes line.

We are building a new house also on a 500m2 block, that will have an even bigger back yard. Done by having a double story house, meaning the ground footprint is slightly less than the current house, but overall house size 75% bigger. The new house is sited reasonably close to the foot path (about 5m) but being a cul-de-sac road noise won’t be an issue. Hence the back yard will be about 50% bigger than out existing one, which is more than enough for 2 kids aged 4 and 5.

But I do recognise that even this isn’t enough for everyone, so don’t begrudge anyway who wants the older style 800+ blocks. The point I have been making is just because some want that doesn’t mean that everyone else is being forced into it by the government. Look around the country and indeed the world and smaller is where people are heading. So IMO planning is reflective of modern day standards as opposed to some big conspiracy to make more money for the government and developers.

Sounds like you are building another MacMansion in Gungahlin.

I am, made not secret of the fact either in other threads over the past few months. The house and the amenities of the area will suit my families needs perfectly and as mentioned above we will still have the same if not more usable land for our vegie patch, fruit trees and a reasonable amount of lawn for the kids to play on including room for a rotary hoist. Though hope the kids don’t do to that what I did to my mums, new ones these days are not as strong!

And plus I will still be closer to the city than 90% of Tuggeranong (Only parts of Kambah are closer), though for us the light rail won’t be a viable option, but think I’ve mentioned this before the light rail is there mainly to service the Flemmington Road/Northborne Ave corridor rather than the entire township of Gungahlin. Though I might be moving to work in the city soon, so on a cost rather than time basis using the EPIC Park and Ride might be a good option.

90% of Tuggeranongites have no desire to travel to the city anyhow.

That is fairly obvious and explains the insular nature of many down that way. Maybe they should get out a bit more, and they might realise they are not getting as short changed as they THINK they are.

90% of Tuggerangongites have no need to travel to the city anyhow.

I would dispute the “no need to travel to the city” comment. As someone who has lived in Tuggeranong her whole life, I don’t work in the City but I do travel in at least twice a week. The shopping is better and the restaurants allow for more choice than those at the Hyperdome or Woden Plaza, and there are cheaper options than at Kingston or Manuka.

You couldn’t pay me enough to live in a McMansion in Gungahlin. I’d rather an older house with character and no restrictive covenants than in a huge, painted concrete house with a defaults list as long as my arm. It’s not about the backyards either. But then, while I am a young professional, I don’t have kids so I’m not in the target demographic for those looking to buy out there.

No need to dispute that as I said “90%” have no need to travel to Civic.
You are one of the remaining 10%.

Thank you, but I don’t flatter myself that I am in the minority of people who live in Tuggeranong.

Furthermore, by the logic that 90% of people from the dirty south have no need to go to the City, would that not also go for people in Belconnen or Gungahlin? How is the “need” defined? Surely with all of the infrastructure and shops in the far north, most people might like to go to the City every so often, but they don’t need to. Why is Tuggeranong receiving the brunt of the blockage from Civic?

Why are you even debating his ‘90%’? Unless he actually provides some actual evidence, it can be safely assumed he’s pulled a figure out of nowhere (to be polite) and is passing off his opinion as a stat.

You have a point there. Use of percentages does baffle some people.
So there is no further misunderstaning I declare that 9 out of 10 Tuggeranonites have no reason to travel to Civic.

bj_ACT bj_ACT 11:55 am 01 Mar 16

rubaiyat said :

You didn’t mention the snowy mountains highway.

Didn’t fit the theme of Tuggeranong neglect?

You’ll have to explain what you mean????

rubaiyat rubaiyat 6:33 pm 29 Feb 16

You didn’t mention the snowy mountains highway.

Didn’t fit the theme of Tuggeranong neglect?

rommeldog56 rommeldog56 5:44 pm 29 Feb 16

bj_ACT said :

So you mean Horse Park Drive is due for duplication ahead of Tuggers roads? The road that has less average daily usage according to traffic volume stats than the single lane Tuggeranong roads of:
Ashley Drive 23,300 per day
Erindale Drive 20,050 per day
Isabella Drive 19,850 per day
Horse Park Drive 15,350 per day

Mind you Horse Park Drive gets a lot more use than a lot of already duplicated roads in Belconnen and North Canberra.

Of course – thats what i would expect. Gunners is ACT labor heartland. Also, the MLA who replaced the beloved Katy Gallagher, Megan Fitzharris, is an active MLA, has sponsored petitions for road duplication & improvements in Gunners and actively lobbies for that – despite the soon to arrive Tram !

I wonder if that is a lesson in effective representation for the ineffective, apparently uncaring and/or apathetic Tuggeranong Labor MLAs !!! Nah, probably not………!

Postalgeek Postalgeek 1:44 pm 29 Feb 16

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

Charlotte Harper said :

All good points (especially the one about garden maintenance). As for why people like big back yards, here are a few reasons I can think of off the top of my head: so the dog has space to run around, so the family can play backyard cricket, so there can be trees with shade to sit under, so the kids can play under the sprinklers in summer, for camping practice runs, for kids’ birthday party games, so you can dry the washing on a Hills Hoist which is so much more effective than a wall line, so you can have a veggie patch, so the kids can have a small patch of garden to grow plants of their choice, so you can grow herbs and fruit trees as well as flowers.

It is how you use the space that matters not how big it is.

My current home, 15 years old the block is 500m2. We have an 110m2 house+double garage and 20m2 deck. Our garden has 15 rose bushes, an apple tree, 3 citrus tree’s, a 3x5m vegie patch and a border garden in the back yard of natives and 250m2 of grass for the kids to run around and play on and did I mention a rotry clothes line.

We are building a new house also on a 500m2 block, that will have an even bigger back yard. Done by having a double story house, meaning the ground footprint is slightly less than the current house, but overall house size 75% bigger. The new house is sited reasonably close to the foot path (about 5m) but being a cul-de-sac road noise won’t be an issue. Hence the back yard will be about 50% bigger than out existing one, which is more than enough for 2 kids aged 4 and 5.

But I do recognise that even this isn’t enough for everyone, so don’t begrudge anyway who wants the older style 800+ blocks. The point I have been making is just because some want that doesn’t mean that everyone else is being forced into it by the government. Look around the country and indeed the world and smaller is where people are heading. So IMO planning is reflective of modern day standards as opposed to some big conspiracy to make more money for the government and developers.

Sounds like you are building another MacMansion in Gungahlin.

I am, made not secret of the fact either in other threads over the past few months. The house and the amenities of the area will suit my families needs perfectly and as mentioned above we will still have the same if not more usable land for our vegie patch, fruit trees and a reasonable amount of lawn for the kids to play on including room for a rotary hoist. Though hope the kids don’t do to that what I did to my mums, new ones these days are not as strong!

And plus I will still be closer to the city than 90% of Tuggeranong (Only parts of Kambah are closer), though for us the light rail won’t be a viable option, but think I’ve mentioned this before the light rail is there mainly to service the Flemmington Road/Northborne Ave corridor rather than the entire township of Gungahlin. Though I might be moving to work in the city soon, so on a cost rather than time basis using the EPIC Park and Ride might be a good option.

90% of Tuggeranongites have no desire to travel to the city anyhow.

That is fairly obvious and explains the insular nature of many down that way. Maybe they should get out a bit more, and they might realise they are not getting as short changed as they THINK they are.

90% of Tuggerangongites have no need to travel to the city anyhow.

I would dispute the “no need to travel to the city” comment. As someone who has lived in Tuggeranong her whole life, I don’t work in the City but I do travel in at least twice a week. The shopping is better and the restaurants allow for more choice than those at the Hyperdome or Woden Plaza, and there are cheaper options than at Kingston or Manuka.

You couldn’t pay me enough to live in a McMansion in Gungahlin. I’d rather an older house with character and no restrictive covenants than in a huge, painted concrete house with a defaults list as long as my arm. It’s not about the backyards either. But then, while I am a young professional, I don’t have kids so I’m not in the target demographic for those looking to buy out there.

No need to dispute that as I said “90%” have no need to travel to Civic.
You are one of the remaining 10%.

Thank you, but I don’t flatter myself that I am in the minority of people who live in Tuggeranong.

Furthermore, by the logic that 90% of people from the dirty south have no need to go to the City, would that not also go for people in Belconnen or Gungahlin? How is the “need” defined? Surely with all of the infrastructure and shops in the far north, most people might like to go to the City every so often, but they don’t need to. Why is Tuggeranong receiving the brunt of the blockage from Civic?

Why are you even debating his ‘90%’? Unless he actually provides some actual evidence, it can be safely assumed he’s pulled a figure out of nowhere (to be polite) and is passing off his opinion as a stat.

nazasaurus nazasaurus 1:33 pm 29 Feb 16

Used to live in Gungahlin and certainly wont be back. While it might appeal to certain families or budgets, I cant help but shake my head that we accept such poor planning and development by our government and don’t demand better. The cramped block sizes, uncut grass, lack of trees, lack of shaded areas, poor building standards (thank to self regulation by the industry instead of our government protecting us from charlatans) ugly architecture (concrete cube with splash of lime anyone), 50 minute drive to work and if you like a social life spending your entire life commuting to other parts of Canberra. The positives are the town centre, while fugly is practical, you can get lots done in one go.

madelini madelini 1:29 pm 29 Feb 16

dungfungus said :

Maya123 said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

90% of Tuggerangongites have no need to travel to the city anyhow.

I would dispute the “no need to travel to the city” comment. As someone who has lived in Tuggeranong her whole life, I don’t work in the City but I do travel in at least twice a week. The shopping is better and the restaurants allow for more choice than those at the Hyperdome or Woden Plaza, and there are cheaper options than at Kingston or Manuka.

You couldn’t pay me enough to live in a McMansion in Gungahlin. I’d rather an older house with character and no restrictive covenants than in a huge, painted concrete house with a defaults list as long as my arm. It’s not about the backyards either. But then, while I am a young professional, I don’t have kids so I’m not in the target demographic for those looking to buy out there.

Twice a week for shopping and restaurants! That’s a choice, not a need. And an expensive choice.

Not all the wealthy people live in Forrest.

Of course they don’t. That said, the largest concentration of Canberra’s wealthiest people live in the Inner South (Forrest, Red Hill, Kingston, Griffith, Yarralulma, Deakin) and the Inner North (Reid, Campbell, Turner, O’Connor, Ainslie). Not to dispute that there are wealthy people living elsewhere – even Kambah has Gleneagles.

But at the end of the day, to say that the City does not belong to people who live further out not by choice but because the cost of rent and property prices is prohibitive to those who don’t earn much (and god forbid, are single and trying to do anything without a co-investor or housemate) is shortchanging both them and the notion of having a CBD/central cultural precinct.

bj_ACT bj_ACT 12:19 pm 29 Feb 16

JC said :

David M said :

Anyway, I quite like it. It’s just a shame that it’s a tough place to get out of in the morning, and back into in the afternoon. Apart from some of the roadworks on Gungahlin Drive, which are a temporary inconvenience, the Majura Parkway does a wonderful job, pity that Horse Park Drive wasn’t similarly widened to take the traffic. Funny about the way the ACT Government goes about its traffic planning, shifting choke points from one place to another.

They duplicate when the demand is there, and Horse Park Drive the demand is now there.

But interesting what you say about planning, go to Molonglo and the main road there has been built as dual carriage way, despite demand not needing it. Personally think it is a good way to go, but google it on these boards and you will find people whinging about dual carriageway roads to nowhere. Government can never win hey?

So you mean Horse Park Drive is due for duplication ahead of Tuggers roads? The road that has less average daily usage according to traffic volume stats than the single lane Tuggeranong roads of:
Ashley Drive 23,300 per day
Erindale Drive 20,050 per day
Isabella Drive 19,850 per day
Horse Park Drive 15,350 per day

Mind you Horse Park Drive gets a lot more use than a lot of already duplicated roads in Belconnen and North Canberra.

JC JC 11:04 am 29 Feb 16

David M said :

Anyway, I quite like it. It’s just a shame that it’s a tough place to get out of in the morning, and back into in the afternoon. Apart from some of the roadworks on Gungahlin Drive, which are a temporary inconvenience, the Majura Parkway does a wonderful job, pity that Horse Park Drive wasn’t similarly widened to take the traffic. Funny about the way the ACT Government goes about its traffic planning, shifting choke points from one place to another.

They duplicate when the demand is there, and Horse Park Drive the demand is now there.

But interesting what you say about planning, go to Molonglo and the main road there has been built as dual carriage way, despite demand not needing it. Personally think it is a good way to go, but google it on these boards and you will find people whinging about dual carriageway roads to nowhere. Government can never win hey?

madelini madelini 9:48 am 29 Feb 16

dungfungus said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

Charlotte Harper said :

All good points (especially the one about garden maintenance). As for why people like big back yards, here are a few reasons I can think of off the top of my head: so the dog has space to run around, so the family can play backyard cricket, so there can be trees with shade to sit under, so the kids can play under the sprinklers in summer, for camping practice runs, for kids’ birthday party games, so you can dry the washing on a Hills Hoist which is so much more effective than a wall line, so you can have a veggie patch, so the kids can have a small patch of garden to grow plants of their choice, so you can grow herbs and fruit trees as well as flowers.

It is how you use the space that matters not how big it is.

My current home, 15 years old the block is 500m2. We have an 110m2 house+double garage and 20m2 deck. Our garden has 15 rose bushes, an apple tree, 3 citrus tree’s, a 3x5m vegie patch and a border garden in the back yard of natives and 250m2 of grass for the kids to run around and play on and did I mention a rotry clothes line.

We are building a new house also on a 500m2 block, that will have an even bigger back yard. Done by having a double story house, meaning the ground footprint is slightly less than the current house, but overall house size 75% bigger. The new house is sited reasonably close to the foot path (about 5m) but being a cul-de-sac road noise won’t be an issue. Hence the back yard will be about 50% bigger than out existing one, which is more than enough for 2 kids aged 4 and 5.

But I do recognise that even this isn’t enough for everyone, so don’t begrudge anyway who wants the older style 800+ blocks. The point I have been making is just because some want that doesn’t mean that everyone else is being forced into it by the government. Look around the country and indeed the world and smaller is where people are heading. So IMO planning is reflective of modern day standards as opposed to some big conspiracy to make more money for the government and developers.

Sounds like you are building another MacMansion in Gungahlin.

I am, made not secret of the fact either in other threads over the past few months. The house and the amenities of the area will suit my families needs perfectly and as mentioned above we will still have the same if not more usable land for our vegie patch, fruit trees and a reasonable amount of lawn for the kids to play on including room for a rotary hoist. Though hope the kids don’t do to that what I did to my mums, new ones these days are not as strong!

And plus I will still be closer to the city than 90% of Tuggeranong (Only parts of Kambah are closer), though for us the light rail won’t be a viable option, but think I’ve mentioned this before the light rail is there mainly to service the Flemmington Road/Northborne Ave corridor rather than the entire township of Gungahlin. Though I might be moving to work in the city soon, so on a cost rather than time basis using the EPIC Park and Ride might be a good option.

90% of Tuggeranongites have no desire to travel to the city anyhow.

That is fairly obvious and explains the insular nature of many down that way. Maybe they should get out a bit more, and they might realise they are not getting as short changed as they THINK they are.

90% of Tuggerangongites have no need to travel to the city anyhow.

I would dispute the “no need to travel to the city” comment. As someone who has lived in Tuggeranong her whole life, I don’t work in the City but I do travel in at least twice a week. The shopping is better and the restaurants allow for more choice than those at the Hyperdome or Woden Plaza, and there are cheaper options than at Kingston or Manuka.

You couldn’t pay me enough to live in a McMansion in Gungahlin. I’d rather an older house with character and no restrictive covenants than in a huge, painted concrete house with a defaults list as long as my arm. It’s not about the backyards either. But then, while I am a young professional, I don’t have kids so I’m not in the target demographic for those looking to buy out there.

No need to dispute that as I said “90%” have no need to travel to Civic.
You are one of the remaining 10%.

Thank you, but I don’t flatter myself that I am in the minority of people who live in Tuggeranong.

Furthermore, by the logic that 90% of people from the dirty south have no need to go to the City, would that not also go for people in Belconnen or Gungahlin? How is the “need” defined? Surely with all of the infrastructure and shops in the far north, most people might like to go to the City every so often, but they don’t need to. Why is Tuggeranong receiving the brunt of the blockage from Civic?

dungfungus dungfungus 11:12 am 28 Feb 16

Maya123 said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

Charlotte Harper said :

All good points (especially the one about garden maintenance). As for why people like big back yards, here are a few reasons I can think of off the top of my head: so the dog has space to run around, so the family can play backyard cricket, so there can be trees with shade to sit under, so the kids can play under the sprinklers in summer, for camping practice runs, for kids’ birthday party games, so you can dry the washing on a Hills Hoist which is so much more effective than a wall line, so you can have a veggie patch, so the kids can have a small patch of garden to grow plants of their choice, so you can grow herbs and fruit trees as well as flowers.

It is how you use the space that matters not how big it is.

My current home, 15 years old the block is 500m2. We have an 110m2 house+double garage and 20m2 deck. Our garden has 15 rose bushes, an apple tree, 3 citrus tree’s, a 3x5m vegie patch and a border garden in the back yard of natives and 250m2 of grass for the kids to run around and play on and did I mention a rotry clothes line.

We are building a new house also on a 500m2 block, that will have an even bigger back yard. Done by having a double story house, meaning the ground footprint is slightly less than the current house, but overall house size 75% bigger. The new house is sited reasonably close to the foot path (about 5m) but being a cul-de-sac road noise won’t be an issue. Hence the back yard will be about 50% bigger than out existing one, which is more than enough for 2 kids aged 4 and 5.

But I do recognise that even this isn’t enough for everyone, so don’t begrudge anyway who wants the older style 800+ blocks. The point I have been making is just because some want that doesn’t mean that everyone else is being forced into it by the government. Look around the country and indeed the world and smaller is where people are heading. So IMO planning is reflective of modern day standards as opposed to some big conspiracy to make more money for the government and developers.

Sounds like you are building another MacMansion in Gungahlin.

I am, made not secret of the fact either in other threads over the past few months. The house and the amenities of the area will suit my families needs perfectly and as mentioned above we will still have the same if not more usable land for our vegie patch, fruit trees and a reasonable amount of lawn for the kids to play on including room for a rotary hoist. Though hope the kids don’t do to that what I did to my mums, new ones these days are not as strong!

And plus I will still be closer to the city than 90% of Tuggeranong (Only parts of Kambah are closer), though for us the light rail won’t be a viable option, but think I’ve mentioned this before the light rail is there mainly to service the Flemmington Road/Northborne Ave corridor rather than the entire township of Gungahlin. Though I might be moving to work in the city soon, so on a cost rather than time basis using the EPIC Park and Ride might be a good option.

90% of Tuggeranongites have no desire to travel to the city anyhow.

That is fairly obvious and explains the insular nature of many down that way. Maybe they should get out a bit more, and they might realise they are not getting as short changed as they THINK they are.

90% of Tuggerangongites have no need to travel to the city anyhow.

I would dispute the “no need to travel to the city” comment. As someone who has lived in Tuggeranong her whole life, I don’t work in the City but I do travel in at least twice a week. The shopping is better and the restaurants allow for more choice than those at the Hyperdome or Woden Plaza, and there are cheaper options than at Kingston or Manuka.

You couldn’t pay me enough to live in a McMansion in Gungahlin. I’d rather an older house with character and no restrictive covenants than in a huge, painted concrete house with a defaults list as long as my arm. It’s not about the backyards either. But then, while I am a young professional, I don’t have kids so I’m not in the target demographic for those looking to buy out there.

Twice a week for shopping and restaurants! That’s a choice, not a need. And an expensive choice.

Not all the wealthy people live in Forrest.

David M David M 10:07 pm 26 Feb 16

I’ve been in Gungahlin since we moved to Canberra in 2002. It’s coming along. I don’t find the town centre depressing, quite utilitarian, in fact. None of Canberra’s town centres are particularly wonderful and each have their own issues of accessibility, parking and so on. At one stage the planners, who no doubt know these things (?), suggested it had more coffee shops per metre than anywhere else in the ACT. Never mind the quality, feel the width!

Anyway, I quite like it. It’s just a shame that it’s a tough place to get out of in the morning, and back into in the afternoon. Apart from some of the roadworks on Gungahlin Drive, which are a temporary inconvenience, the Majura Parkway does a wonderful job, pity that Horse Park Drive wasn’t similarly widened to take the traffic. Funny about the way the ACT Government goes about its traffic planning, shifting choke points from one place to another.

madelini madelini 3:11 pm 26 Feb 16

Maya123 said :

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

dungfungus said :

JC said :

Charlotte Harper said :

All good points (especially the one about garden maintenance). As for why people like big back yards, here are a few reasons I can think of off the top of my head: so the dog has space to run around, so the family can play backyard cricket, so there can be trees with shade to sit under, so the kids can play under the sprinklers in summer, for camping practice runs, for kids’ birthday party games, so you can dry the washing on a Hills Hoist which is so much more effective than a wall line, so you can have a veggie patch, so the kids can have a small patch of garden to grow plants of their choice, so you can grow herbs and fruit trees as well as flowers.

It is how you use the space that matters not how big it is.

My current home, 15 years old the block is 500m2. We have an 110m2 house+double garage and 20m2 deck. Our garden has 15 rose bushes, an apple tree, 3 citrus tree’s, a 3x5m vegie patch and a border garden in the back yard of natives and 250m2 of grass for the kids to run around and play on and did I mention a rotry clothes line.

We are building a new house also on a 500m2 block, that will have an even bigger back yard. Done by having a double story house, meaning the ground footprint is slightly less than the current house, but overall house size 75% bigger. The new house is sited reasonably close to the foot path (about 5m) but being a cul-de-sac road noise won’t be an issue. Hence the back yard will be about 50% bigger than out existing one, which is more than enough for 2 kids aged 4 and 5.

But I do recognise that even this isn’t enough for everyone, so don’t begrudge anyway who wants the older style 800+ blocks. The point I have been making is just because some want that doesn’t mean that everyone else is being forced into it by the government. Look around the country and indeed the world and smaller is where people are heading. So IMO planning is reflective of modern day standards as opposed to some big conspiracy to make more money for the government and developers.

Sounds like you are building another MacMansion in Gungahlin.

I am, made not secret of the fact either in other threads over the past few months. The house and the amenities of the area will suit my families needs perfectly and as mentioned above we will still have the same if not more usable land for our vegie patch, fruit trees and a reasonable amount of lawn for the kids to play on including room for a rotary hoist. Though hope the kids don’t do to that what I did to my mums, new ones these days are not as strong!

And plus I will still be closer to the city than 90% of Tuggeranong (Only parts of Kambah are closer), though for us the light rail won’t be a viable option, but think I’ve mentioned this before the light rail is there mainly to service the Flemmington Road/Northborne Ave corridor rather than the entire township of Gungahlin. Though I might be moving to work in the city soon, so on a cost rather than time basis using the EPIC Park and Ride might be a good option.

90% of Tuggeranongites have no desire to travel to the city anyhow.

That is fairly obvious and explains the insular nature of many down that way. Maybe they should get out a bit more, and they might realise they are not getting as short changed as they THINK they are.

90% of Tuggerangongites have no need to travel to the city anyhow.

I would dispute the “no need to travel to the city” comment. As someone who has lived in Tuggeranong her whole life, I don’t work in the City but I do travel in at least twice a week. The shopping is better and the restaurants allow for more choice than those at the Hyperdome or Woden Plaza, and there are cheaper options than at Kingston or Manuka.

You couldn’t pay me enough to live in a McMansion in Gungahlin. I’d rather an older house with character and no restrictive covenants than in a huge, painted concrete house with a defaults list as long as my arm. It’s not about the backyards either. But then, while I am a young professional, I don’t have kids so I’m not in the target demographic for those looking to buy out there.

Twice a week for shopping and restaurants! That’s a choice, not a need. And an expensive choice.

Forgive me if I, like many other people, choose to enjoy the best offerings of our city than the Coffee Club at the Hyperdome. Or, are those aspects just for the privileged few who earn above $80k/annum and live in a 12km radius of the City Centre? Some of us are also not lucky enough to have all friends and family living in the same part of Canberra, but still enjoy being able to catch up in person.

Some things are worth the slight increase in expense.

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