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The Pirate Party needs you!

By pirate_taco - 26 June 2012 42

Press Release: Pirate Party – ACT

Pirate Party Australia’s ACT branch (PPAU-ACT) aims to contest the October Legislative Assembly election in Canberra, and needs your support to make it happen.

The Pirate Party requires 100 members who are registered to vote within the ACT before Thursday 28 June, in order to register the Party within the ACT. However, if they do not achieve the necessary numbers by Thursday, they plan to still field independent candidates.

The Pirate Party stands for individual privacy, and feels that constant surveillance is a violation of the presumption of innocence. The Party believes that only those suspected of criminal activity should be monitored, and only for a limited time.

“While we consider individual privacy to be extremely important, we also push for greater transparency of Government,” said Stuart Biggs, co-ordinator of Pirate Party ACT. “Our representatives need to be accountable, and hiding behind exceptions to the Freedom of Information Act is an inappropriate method of governing.”

The first Pirate Party was formed in Sweden in 2006, and since then over 40 international groups have adopted the “Pirate Party” name.

“By calling ourselves Pirates, we have appropriated the name. If intellectual property lobbyists are allowed to use it in such a misleading manner, branding people who share things they like with that label, then we are more than happy to use it ourselves. If pirates want freedom, then we are Pirates,” Mr Biggs continued. “Pirate Party ACT in no way advocates the illegal duplication and distribution of copyrighted materials. We simply recognise that the copyright mechanism as it stands currently does not work. It doesn’t compensate artists properly and it doesn’t foster creation of original works. Human culture ignores the artificial limitations it tries to set, and it just isn’t enforceable. We want to fix this.”

Pirate Party Australia liken the ACT to Berlin, Germany, where the local Pirate Party there had a major breakthrough, securing 8.9% of the vote and 15 state parliament seats. Like Berlin, the ACT is a comparatively small electorate and uses a proportional representation system, two elements that may have been responsible for the success of the Pirate Party in Berlin.
“We are not expecting to duplicate Berlin, though it would be fantastic if we could. But there are similarities. We feel that there are a high percentage of voters sympathetic to our message and ideals, and are currently unrepresented in ACT politics,” Mr Biggs concluded.

You can sign up as a member of Pirate Party Australia for free at https://join.pirateparty.org.au. By signing up as a member within the ACT you show your support for individual privacy, government transparency, freedom of speech, freedom of the press and freedom of association, and have a real chance of seeing these issues represented within the ACT.

Join before Thursday 28th if you want to vote Pirate in October.

https://join.pirateparty.org.au

What’s Your opinion?


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42 Responses to
The Pirate Party needs you!
Postalgeek 3:48 pm 28 Jun 12

pirate_taco said :

Postalgeek said :

We simply recognise that the copyright mechanism as it stands currently does not work. It doesn%u2019t compensate artists properly and it doesn%u2019t foster creation of original works. Human culture ignores the artificial limitations it tries to set, and it just isn%u2019t enforceable. We want to fix this.

So what does the PP propose to compensate artists properly and foster creation of original works?

I don’t have a link to the economic studies that back this up right now, but we have chosen 20 years because it was at roughly that point where there was a greater benefit to the public in having music/movies/etc become public domain, as opposed to the dwindling benefit to the artist.
After that time, almost no artists make a significant return on their work any more, and they should enter the public domain.

A rich public domain enabled companies like Disney to flourish, yet they have been one of the worst offenders with lobbying for increases in the length of copyright.

In the case of the rare artist that manages to have a mega hit that still produces income 20 years after the fact, they are free to create new works.

You might have to explain to me in simpler terms how reducing copyright to 20 years ‘properly’ compensates an artist, when you’ve just deprived them of any ability to support themselves through their own work later in life or benefit their children with their legacy?

And what exactly do pirates create in order to offset their sense of entitlement to the efforts of those that are creative?

pirate_taco 3:02 pm 28 Jun 12

Postalgeek said :

We simply recognise that the copyright mechanism as it stands currently does not work. It doesn’t compensate artists properly and it doesn’t foster creation of original works. Human culture ignores the artificial limitations it tries to set, and it just isn’t enforceable. We want to fix this.

So what does the PP propose to compensate artists properly and foster creation of original works?

I don’t have a link to the economic studies that back this up right now, but we have chosen 20 years because it was at roughly that point where there was a greater benefit to the public in having music/movies/etc become public domain, as opposed to the dwindling benefit to the artist.
After that time, almost no artists make a significant return on their work any more, and they should enter the public domain.

A rich public domain enabled companies like Disney to flourish, yet they have been one of the worst offenders with lobbying for increases in the length of copyright.

In the case of the rare artist that manages to have a mega hit that still produces income 20 years after the fact, they are free to create new works.

NoImRight 2:11 pm 28 Jun 12

I dont want to sound negative but no. Parties website is vague and full of feel good phrases without any plans or real proposals. First time I had a question about your supposed policies all I got was duck and weave.I can get that from a regular party. Why go out of my way to encourage more?

VYBerlinaV8_is_back 1:02 pm 28 Jun 12

Sounds kinda like slutwalk, but for politicians.

Jivrashia 12:26 pm 28 Jun 12

Sorry, but I’m already a pirate, but of a Pastafarian kind… ARRrrrrrrrrRAMEN!

Postalgeek 11:11 am 28 Jun 12

We simply recognise that the copyright mechanism as it stands currently does not work. It doesn’t compensate artists properly and it doesn’t foster creation of original works. Human culture ignores the artificial limitations it tries to set, and it just isn’t enforceable. We want to fix this.

So what does the PP propose to compensate artists properly and foster creation of original works?

pirate_taco 11:06 am 28 Jun 12

About 30 more to go.
C’mon Canberra!

PantsMan 10:41 am 28 Jun 12

Bump!

It’s either these guys, or well be stuck with the Motorists Party in October.

pirate_taco 11:00 pm 27 Jun 12

We are getting closer to the target. Last number I heard was 40 more members to go.

PantsMan 12:28 pm 27 Jun 12

Come on RIOTers! Sign up!

NoImRight 10:30 am 27 Jun 12

Canberra and Berlin are exactly alike! Well spotted. I can hardly wait to subscribe to your newsletter.

Deref 8:13 am 27 Jun 12

Would have joined, but I’m already a member of another party and the Pirates don’t allow dual memberships. Fair enough I suppose. Arrrrrr sez I.

ReverandRandom 11:28 pm 26 Jun 12

Current A.C.T. headcount is nearly 50 at the current point in time.

bd84 7:28 pm 26 Jun 12

We already have a bunch of clowns in coalition government, we don’t need pirates too..

Holden Caulfield 1:09 pm 26 Jun 12

All those in favour say, “Arrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr!”

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