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Road Rage in Canberra – Just CALM DOWN!!

By 28 August 2014 58

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I’ve done a lot of stupid things in cars and on motorbikes in my life. I’ve driven drunk on numerous occasions; I’ve pushed a car past 200 KMs per hour; and once, I attempted to jump over a small dam on my little XR 75… I didn’t… quite… make it. However, I’ve never had an accident on a public road, and my days of reckless driving are but a distant memory in the rear vision mirror of time. In fact, many of my friends accuse me of driving like a grandpa – a critique I take with pride.

Like you, there are a lot of people out there on Canberra’s roads who really make me angry. Nothing puts the sand in my crack more than people who drive at high speed in school zones, or those people who somehow think that the more they tailgate you, the faster they will arrive at their destination. Sometimes it almost seems that the foggier or rainier the weather, the faster some Canberran drivers want to drive. Canberra’s roads are often war zones – a furious flurry of erected fingers and muted expletives – and I can understand people’s frustrations, but what I will never understand is road rage.

Recently this year there have been a growing number of serious incidents of road rage on Canberra’s roads. The most recent and public example of Canberra’s road rage problem would be Daniel Forsyth, 29, who was sentenced to 10 months gaol by ACT’s Chief Magistrate for furious driving, assault, and possession of a dangerous weapon. Unfortunately, this incident was also underscored by a disconcerting racist element. Police have also alleged that last Saturday morning a young man smashed a car’s window with a shifter before fleeing on the Barton Highway at about 11am.

The answer to Canberra’s road rage certainly isn’t more punitive and authoritarian measures in the form of legislation. Although, in order to improve the ACT’s quality of driving, I am in favour of more thorough driving tests rather than slugging families by forcing them to pay exorbitant fees for driving lessons. Other than already living in the most regulated jurisdiction in Australia, more laws just waste the time of police, clog up the courts, and annoy the public… possibly contributing to more rage. What Canberrans and their families expect and deserve is a greater police presence on Canberra’s roads.

We don’t want more parking inspectors; we don’t want more roadside vehicle inspections; and we don’t want more drugs testing to see if someone has had a toke of a joint a few days ago. We want our fellow police officers to protect us from the small minded bast#rds who put our lives, and the lives of our children, in danger every day. A good driver is a safe driver.

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58 Responses to Road Rage in Canberra – Just CALM DOWN!!
#1
bundah9:18 am, 28 Aug 14

I’ve been saying for years that there needs to be high visibility policing on Canberra roads but Simon Corbell obviously doesn’t believe it’s warranted. The ivory tower syndrome is alive and well!

#2
Holden Caulfield9:25 am, 28 Aug 14

It’s hard to argue against the expected benefits increased Police presence on the roads would bring. But I’m sure someone has a study somewhere to prove that having less Police seen on our roads is better, haha.

#3
house_husband9:44 am, 28 Aug 14

The bottom line is if you’re not speeding there is almost zero chance of being caught for other dangerous driving behaviours that contribute to the major of casualty accidents in the ACT..

Until something is done about those, and the ease with which you can get and hold a driver’s licence, the road toll will remain about the same.

#4
Very Busy10:04 am, 28 Aug 14

Yes, absolutely we need more police on the roads. We need them in both marked and unmarked vehicles. But most of all, we need them to enforce ALL of the road rules. The reason that drivers here flaunt the road rules is because they can. You can be a terrible driver, an arrogant and rude driver, and easily get away with it because there are no consequences for doing the wrong thing.

The use of fog lights in clear weather is a good example. Rightly or wrongly, using fog lights in clear weather conditions is illegal. That is the law. Yet about 15% of drivers have them turned on in clear weather. No one ever gets a ticket for committing this offence. The message this gives is that it is quite ok to break the law. If it is deemed that it is ok to use fog lights in clear weather then CHANGE THE LAW. While the law exists, the police are failing in their duty by not enforcing it.

Only when we train drivers (by using proper law enforcement) to obey ALL the road rules, will we see a drop in the numbers of speed, red light, and mobile phone related offences. We need to change the culture.

It always amuses me when Rod Anderson gets on the media and says he is “yet again disappointed with Canberra drivers” and he is doing nothing to change anything. Just keeps peddling the same old lines that few people take any notice of.

Perhaps Rod Anderson in conjunction with Minister Rattenbury could kick off a campaign seeking feedback from road users to identify locations where road rules are commonly ignored. Such as: Turning right from Brisbane Ave onto Wentworth Ave in the afternoon peak. It’s difficult to wait until the solid line finishes, to move over to the left on Wentworth Ave because drivers behind illegally cross the solid line and undertake. People will think twice if they get a ticket for this type of offence which currently gets no special attention.

It has got to the point where it will take a long time, perhaps a decade or so, to change the culture.

#5
Rawhide Kid Part310:58 am, 28 Aug 14

If you want more ‘visible’ Police on our roads, then you have to increase our Police presence. They’re not just siting at the the Police station twiddling their thumbs. If you want more Police on the road then the ongoing cost of that has to come from somewhere. Rates? New Taxes on Registration?, a bit like the Road Rescue Tax maybe?

#6
McPete11:00 am, 28 Aug 14

Having come to Canberra from Wollongong about three years ago, the drivers here are better in some regards, and worse in others.

We certainly drive faster down here, but as a cyclist, I have an easier time in traffic- More drivers here consider me a legitimate road user than back home.

I’m changing jobs soon, and the change means I’ll be driving every day, so perhaps I’ll be out there copping it for actually driving at the speed limit!

#7
Very Busy11:11 am, 28 Aug 14

Rawhide Kid Part3 said :

If you want more Police on the road then the ongoing cost of that has to come from somewhere. Rates? New Taxes on Registration?, a bit like the Road Rescue Tax maybe?

…..or traffic fines. :)

#8
Pork Hunt11:28 am, 28 Aug 14

Rawhide Kid Part3 said :

If you want more ‘visible’ Police on our roads, then you have to increase our Police presence. They’re not just siting at the the Police station twiddling their thumbs. If you want more Police on the road then the ongoing cost of that has to come from somewhere. Rates? New Taxes on Registration?, a bit like the Road Rescue Tax maybe?

The never ever GST was meant to put and end to the taxes you mention. Why isn’t there a public outcry over these things. People must have short memories.

#9
magiccar911:30 am, 28 Aug 14

Rawhide Kid Part3 said :

If you want more ‘visible’ Police on our roads, then you have to increase our Police presence. They’re not just siting at the the Police station twiddling their thumbs. If you want more Police on the road then the ongoing cost of that has to come from somewhere. Rates? New Taxes on Registration?, a bit like the Road Rescue Tax maybe?

Use the “Road Rescue Tax” to pay for it! We don’t need this fee, and if we use it to fund a higher visible police presence on the roads wouldn’t the rate of people needing this assistance decrease anyway?

One of the biggest problems is also people who think that by obeying every rule to the letter they’re doing the right thing. Just because it’s legal to do 65 in an 80 zone occupying the right-hand lane doesn’t mean it’s safe and/or logical to do so. If traffic is flowing at 5 or 10 over the limit, roll with it – you’re only creating a problem for yourself by being self-righteous. People who conduct this type of behaviour are actually increasing road rage and basically bringing it upon themselves (if we’re being honest here).

#10
Maya12311:48 am, 28 Aug 14

“I’ve done a lot of stupid things in cars and on motorbikes in my life. I’ve driven drunk on numerous occasions; I’ve pushed a car past 200 KMs per hour; and once, I attempted to jump over a small dam on my little XR 75… I didn’t… quite… make it. However, I’ve never had an accident on a public road”

Pure luck you have never had an accident on a public road; driving drunk on numerous occasions – didn’t you think you might be lethal and kill someone? Same with pushing a car past 200kms per hour. You’re lucky to be here and other people are lucky you didn’t kill or maim them.
I got my driver’s licence at 17, but I have never driven drunk, or driven at anything close to the speeds you mention. At 17 I was an awful driver and recognised my limits because of inexperience. I lived in a country town and it was too easy to get a driver’s licence. Most kids got their licence with very little driving practice. Basically, if you didn’t crash driving around a few streets in the village and could answer questions on the road rules, you were handed a licence by the local policeman. After I had a licence and gained some experience (on winding, narrow roads along the side of escarpments, etc, some of them dirt roads, potholed roads) my driving improved and I became more confident. I drove faster and have at times pushed the speed limit a little, but only a little. I now find I drive on dirt roads with more confidence than many people. Yes, it can be argued ‘confidence’ is in the mind of the holder. But I would never push a car past 200kms per hour or drive drunk. I am able to recognise how very, VERY dangerous and irresponsible this is, and have been able to since I received my licence at 17. So why couldn’t you?

#11
house_husband1:28 pm, 28 Aug 14

Rawhide Kid Part3 said :

If you want more ‘visible’ Police on our roads, then you have to increase our Police presence. They’re not just siting at the the Police station twiddling their thumbs. If you want more Police on the road then the ongoing cost of that has to come from somewhere. Rates? New Taxes on Registration?, a bit like the Road Rescue Tax maybe?

We do have traffic police but as mentioned by Very Busy all they seem to care about is catching speeding drivers. I pick up my kids from school everyday and each term we get one or two afternoon visits by the police. However all they seem to do is get out a radar gun, check the speed of a few cars and drive off.

Meanwhile there are parents blocking driveways, going the wrong way down car parks, parking illegally and obstructing vision, failing to give way properly, weaving over the road while talking on phones, parking in disabled spots, etc, etc.

There is a reason a dozen people on average die on the road in the ACT each year and it has as much, if not more, to do with these type of drivers as it does with the much maligned speeding or “hoon” driver. And it that aspect of driver behaviour that frustrates people to the point of road rage because there are no consequences.

I would love to see a compulsory 3-6 month driving ban for anyone who contributes to an accident through breaking the road rules. Be it following too closely, undercutting by crossing solid lines, failing to give way.

#12
Rollersk8r1:30 pm, 28 Aug 14

I too have done many stupid things in cars, 20+ years ago. And completely agree there’s way too many people losing it over nothing on our roads.

But all the police in the world aren’t going to stop people getting upset with each other.

#13
astrojax1:49 pm, 28 Aug 14

magiccar9 said :

Rawhide Kid Part3 said :

One of the biggest problems is also people who think that by obeying every rule to the letter they’re doing the right thing.

um, the issuance of your driver’s licence is in the expectation that you will obey all of the road rules – or is there a way i missed when i got mine to pick and choose the ones that suit you? the example you go on to cite is a grey area but, as you argue, this is less than safe and certainly not courteous – which is a commodity that can’t be enforced but should be in every driver’s repertoire as they manoeuvre their deadly machines about the public road system.

testing for a driver’s licence ought to be much more rigorous and repeated at much more frequent intervals. i’d be happy to see rigorous re-testing on say a one in five random pick every five years (when licences here are renewed) and perhaps more intense rules testing (a written or on-line screen test of road rules). and you wouldn’t know if you’re being picked for a driving test until you line up to pay, so you’d need to brush up. if we spend money here, we save much more from our battered health system and insurance costs.

a no-brainer for mine, but which politician will take up the gauntlet?

#14
VYBerlinaV8_is_back2:45 pm, 28 Aug 14

I think it would help to alter the rules a bit to promote traffic flow, much like you see in California, for example. People get frustrated, then stressed, then a simply mistake pushes people into action they wouldn’t normally take.

A couple of weeks ago turning onto the Monaro Hwy heading north I headed out into the slip lane, indicated, then began to move into the traffic. Normally, traffic in that lane slows down a bit, and we do the ‘zipper’ thing to get everyone into one lane. But no, Mr Grey Audi was having none of that, he nailed the throttle to cut me off shouting through the window despite there being no chance of collision and no surprises. His numberplate started with ‘CRY’, and I can see why! But he probably wouldn’t normally behave like that, but was stressing out and a perceived slight pushed him over the edge.

Enough amateur psychiatry from me. Back to full strength coffee…

#15
watto234:15 pm, 28 Aug 14

Very Busy said :

Yes, absolutely we need more police on the roads. We need them in both marked and unmarked vehicles. But most of all, we need them to enforce ALL of the road rules. The reason that drivers here flaunt the road rules is because they can. You can be a terrible driver, an arrogant and rude driver, and easily get away with it because there are no consequences for doing the wrong thing.

The use of fog lights in clear weather is a good example. Rightly or wrongly, using fog lights in clear weather conditions is illegal. That is the law. Yet about 15% of drivers have them turned on in clear weather. No one ever gets a ticket for committing this offence. The message this gives is that it is quite ok to break the law. If it is deemed that it is ok to use fog lights in clear weather then CHANGE THE LAW. While the law exists, the police are failing in their duty by not enforcing it.

Only when we train drivers (by using proper law enforcement) to obey ALL the road rules, will we see a drop in the numbers of speed, red light, and mobile phone related offences. We need to change the culture.

It always amuses me when Rod Anderson gets on the media and says he is “yet again disappointed with Canberra drivers” and he is doing nothing to change anything. Just keeps peddling the same old lines that few people take any notice of.

Perhaps Rod Anderson in conjunction with Minister Rattenbury could kick off a campaign seeking feedback from road users to identify locations where road rules are commonly ignored. Such as: Turning right from Brisbane Ave onto Wentworth Ave in the afternoon peak. It’s difficult to wait until the solid line finishes, to move over to the left on Wentworth Ave because drivers behind illegally cross the solid line and undertake. People will think twice if they get a ticket for this type of offence which currently gets no special attention.

It has got to the point where it will take a long time, perhaps a decade or so, to change the culture.

Regarding fog lights, the main reason cops don’t book for these, is because they are not fog lights. Most are driving lights with a lower brightness than main headlights. So the law is fog lights, but manufacturers call them driving lights and make sure they are no brighter than headlights. They are also often very low and tilted towards the road surface. A cop will never book someone for that offence if commonsense is its not causing a hazard to other drivers. drive with your high beams on in with other traffic around and you’ll get booked.
Some other laws Canberrans are not aware of is giving way at a roundabout. It doesn’t matter if you are not turning into the lane the car on the roundabout is in, the law is give way to them, which means wait til they have passed before entering the roundabout safely.
Also people complain about tailgating and I agree completely about how dangerous it is. But its also dangerous to have the attitude of stuff them, I’m staying in this lane regardless.
People also need to be mindful, that they could in fact be doing say 70km/h in an 80 zone and their dial says 80 km/h. Speedos can be out significantly especially if its under the speed limit. OK its legal, but not courteous. So antagonistic attitudes by people who feel they are always in the right actually doesn’t help either.

I’m definitely in favour of more police on the roads and I’d wouldn’t have an issue with license retesting either. Even just the rules test done every 5 years and maybe a practical test done at say 40 and 60, 70 and 5 years thereafter. I’m not saying older drivers are worse, I’m just saying reactions times and ability to judge does get worse with age. I have the same argument with my 90 yr old grandfather who still drives. He hasn’t got an issue with it, but I suggest if he caused an accident and he lived and the other person died how does he think the other persons family will feel.

#16
Proboscus4:48 pm, 28 Aug 14

I’ve noticed an alarming increase of road rage incidents since the release of Eastman last Friday. Coincidence?

#17
wildturkeycanoe6:14 pm, 28 Aug 14

I only see road rage brewing when people use the right hand lane and drive 10-20km/h below the limit, thus slowing ALL the traffic behind them. The tail-gating, beeping, headlight flashing and constant lane swapping by the frustrated person/s behind will eventually result in road rage to various degrees.
It all comes down to courtesy, if you aren’t going to turn right at the next intersection, don’t use the right hand lane.

#18
justin heywood6:34 pm, 28 Aug 14

wildturkeycanoe said :

I only see road rage brewing when people use the right hand lane and drive 10-20km/h below the limit, thus slowing ALL the traffic behind them. The tail-gating, beeping, headlight flashing and constant lane swapping by the frustrated person/s behind will eventually result in road rage to various degrees.
It all comes down to courtesy, if you aren’t going to turn right at the next intersection, don’t use the right hand lane.

Really? I doubt that I’m alone in having experienced road rage from people when I haven’t been driving any slower than the speed limit, (but obviously not ‘just the 5 or 10 over’ that most people find acceptable).)
I think the problem with most of these self-absorbed idiots is that they think you should be driving at whatever speed THEY think you should be going.

At any rate, close tailgating and other aggressive behaviour is never justified. In my opinion, it is never the fault of anyone else but the perpetrator.

#19
Very Busy6:40 pm, 28 Aug 14

watto23 said :

Regarding fog lights, the main reason cops don’t book for these, is because they are not fog lights. Most are driving lights with a lower brightness than main headlights. So the law is fog lights, but manufacturers call them driving lights and make sure they are no brighter than headlights.

No, manufacturers call them fog lights and that is what they are. Yes some are brighter than others. Commodores, Falcons and some Subaru’s are particularly bright but in the context of law enforcement they should all be turned off in clear weather.

Many cars these days also have daytime running lights (DRL’s) which might be what you are referring to. I am making a distinct reference to fog lights, which is what the vast majority of the offenders are using.

#20
Weatherman8:32 pm, 28 Aug 14

Very Busy said :

The use of fog lights in clear weather is a good example. Rightly or wrongly, using fog lights in clear weather conditions is illegal. That is the law. Yet about 15% of drivers have them turned on in clear weather. No one ever gets a ticket for committing this offence. The message this gives is that it is quite ok to break the law. If it is deemed that it is ok to use fog lights in clear weather then CHANGE THE LAW. While the law exists, the police are failing in their duty by not enforcing it.

It is safer to drive with fog lights in clear, or partially overcast weather. The vehicle may be of similar colour to the clouds or road. It is commonplace in many European countries to drive with headlights on during clear weather.

#21
gooterz9:28 pm, 28 Aug 14

If only we lived in Mario kart land where police driving on the road could collect coins for the ACT government.

Until that happens we go further into chaotic nanny state

#22
bigred9:51 pm, 28 Aug 14

Weatherman said :

Very Busy said :

The use of fog lights in clear weather is a good example. Rightly or wrongly, using fog lights in clear weather conditions is illegal. That is the law. Yet about 15% of drivers have them turned on in clear weather. No one ever gets a ticket for committing this offence. The message this gives is that it is quite ok to break the law. If it is deemed that it is ok to use fog lights in clear weather then CHANGE THE LAW. While the law exists, the police are failing in their duty by not enforcing it.

It is safer to drive with fog lights in clear, or partially overcast weather. The vehicle may be of similar colour to the clouds or road. It is commonplace in many European countries to drive with headlights on during clear weather.

very confused response here. if the euros drive in daylight on low beam, why argue foglights are OK? Seriously though, they probably are not an issue in daylight, but of a night they can cause problems from time to time, hence the rules.

#23
Very Busy10:05 pm, 28 Aug 14

Weatherman said :

It is safer to drive with fog lights in clear, or partially overcast weather. The vehicle may be of similar colour to the clouds or road. It is commonplace in many European countries to drive with headlights on during clear weather.

Not at night time.

I’m not arguing the good and bad about using fog lights. I’m saying that all road rules should be enforced if driver attitudes are to be changed for the better. If there is a road rule that shouldn’t be enforced then it shouldn’t be a road rule.

#24
Hosinator11:40 pm, 28 Aug 14

The sooner google cars and other driverless cars take over, the better. Humans cannot be trusted behind the wheel of a car and the sooner we relinquish our bad driving habits to automated vehicles the better.
For the first time in three years I drove to the City on a Friday night to catch up with friends at about 6pm and the amount of dangerous, self entitled, disgusting behaviour that I witnessed from motorist made me worry for the future of the human race.

#25
JC12:39 am, 29 Aug 14

Weatherman said :

Very Busy said :

The use of fog lights in clear weather is a good example. Rightly or wrongly, using fog lights in clear weather conditions is illegal. That is the law. Yet about 15% of drivers have them turned on in clear weather. No one ever gets a ticket for committing this offence. The message this gives is that it is quite ok to break the law. If it is deemed that it is ok to use fog lights in clear weather then CHANGE THE LAW. While the law exists, the police are failing in their duty by not enforcing it.

It is safer to drive with fog lights in clear, or partially overcast weather. The vehicle may be of similar colour to the clouds or road. It is commonplace in many European countries to drive with headlights on during clear weather.

It is NOT safe to drive with fog lights on except in fog or reduced visibility ie heavy heavy rain. Believe me I have been blinded and almost lost control of my car after being startled by an SUV driving with fog lights on during the day.

You are right though headlights or daytime driving lights on during the day do make your car more visible and both are designed to not shine in the eyes of other cars whereas fog lights are brighter and can shine in other drivers eyes, SUVs and 4wds being higher being he main offenders due to their height.

#26
JC12:46 am, 29 Aug 14

bigred said :

Weatherman said :

Very Busy said :

The use of fog lights in clear weather is a good example. Rightly or wrongly, using fog lights in clear weather conditions is illegal. That is the law. Yet about 15% of drivers have them turned on in clear weather. No one ever gets a ticket for committing this offence. The message this gives is that it is quite ok to break the law. If it is deemed that it is ok to use fog lights in clear weather then CHANGE THE LAW. While the law exists, the police are failing in their duty by not enforcing it.

It is safer to drive with fog lights in clear, or partially overcast weather. The vehicle may be of similar colour to the clouds or road. It is commonplace in many European countries to drive with headlights on during clear weather.

very confused response here. if the euros drive in daylight on low beam, why argue foglights are OK? Seriously though, they probably are not an issue in daylight, but of a night they can cause problems from time to time, hence the rules.

They can also cause issues in the day too. They are very bright and while hey point down they can still startle. Happened to me once on William Hovell drive I was going down the hill towards the city the road turned right and at that time an SUV came the other way with fog lights blaring. The combination of SUV height, their vehicle climbing the hill and the curve contributed to it and for a brief moment I lost fission.

Oh also many European and some other cars have rear fog lights that too can be very very bright again higher vehicles the light could be shining directly into the driver behinds eyes. Dangerous and the reason the rules say poor visibility only.

#27
Weatherman7:08 am, 29 Aug 14

Regarding road rage in Canberra, I think it depends on the location. Canberra drivers are quite courteous compared with other cities. The worst area to drive in Canberra would be Lyneham. It is one of the densest suburbs. There are a few black spot areas and there always seems to be people who are in such a hurry, they will flash their lights or beep their horn at you when not being patient at busy intersections would result in a crash if turning onto a busy road, such as Northbourne Avenue. I always have to ignore these foolish drivers and it leads to repentance. It is close to the government housing though.

Otherwise, I think the majority of behavior Canberra roads is good. I’ve lived in ACT for many years now.

#28
Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd7:58 am, 29 Aug 14

wildturkeycanoe said :

I only see road rage brewing when people use the right hand lane and drive 10-20km/h below the limit, thus slowing ALL the traffic behind them. The tail-gating, beeping, headlight flashing and constant lane swapping by the frustrated person/s behind will eventually result in road rage to various degrees.
It all comes down to courtesy, if you aren’t going to turn right at the next intersection, don’t use the right hand lane.

It’s called the right lane because it’s the right lane to use!

Don’t try and excuse road rage or dangerous driving.

#29
JimCharles8:09 am, 29 Aug 14

Weatherman said :

It is safer to drive with fog lights in clear, or partially overcast weather. The vehicle may be of similar colour to the clouds or road. It is commonplace in many European countries to drive with headlights on during clear weather.

It’s NOT ok to drive with foglights when it’s not foggy, and at night it’s just plain stupidity.
The reason is that it makes it more difficult to notice when somebody is braking, so it’s actually making the situation more dangerous.

#30
JimCharles8:42 am, 29 Aug 14

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd said :

wildturkeycanoe said :

I only see road rage brewing when people use the right hand lane and drive 10-20km/h below the limit, thus slowing ALL the traffic behind them. The tail-gating, beeping, headlight flashing and constant lane swapping by the frustrated person/s behind will eventually result in road rage to various degrees.
It all comes down to courtesy, if you aren’t going to turn right at the next intersection, don’t use the right hand lane.

It’s called the right lane because it’s the right lane to use!

Don’t try and excuse road rage or dangerous driving.

If i’m not overtaking I’ll pull to the left lane, it’s just common sense and avoids hassle, enhances traffic flow. Defensive safe driving.
I just use the UK method and only go in the right lane if I overtake…it’s sort of instinctive, different to the way Australians use dual lanes but the laws of traffic flow are the same everywhere, you adjust to the situation to let everybody make best progress.
They have laws, and they have a driving code. The two can be mutually exclusive…..somebody might not be doing anything “illegal”, but they could still be impacting on the ability of another driver to make progress (ie…pulling out and making them brake sharply or swerve…dawdling in the overtaking lane blocking a line of traffic etc).
You have a duty not to impede the progress of other drivers, even if they’re breaking the law….if they want to act like idiots, it’s not your job to stop them.
They had a lot of this stubbornness from drivers who refused to move over and it was causing road rage and these people were getting attacked, or there were more accidents as people tried to swerve round them.
In the end they had to make a stand because road rage incidents kept on increasing whatever they did.
Ultimately, police can now issue fines to lane hoggers or obstinate drivers who are NOT doing anything illegal, but the thinking is that they should know better than to inflame a situation that they’re obviously aware of and are thus not following the driving code themselves by impeding other drivers’ progress.
Whatever the moral rights and wrongs of this, move over to protect yourself and reduce the chance of an accident. Let the police catch the lunatics.

.

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