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ACT getting two new solar farms

By Barcham 19 August 2013 98

Simon Corbell announced the winners of the ACT Solar Auction today, which means Canberra will now be getting two new large solar farms.

“I am pleased to announce two new solar farms will be developed in Canberra as a result of the Solar Auction process, which will now contribute over $100 million worth of capital investment in renewable energy for our city,” Mr Corbell said.

The winners of the regular stream process of the ACT Solar Auction are:

— Zhenfa Solar for their 13 megawatt Mugga Lane Solar Park on the corner of Mugga Lane and the Monaro Hwy, adjacent to the Mugga Lane Resource Management Centre.

— OneSun for their 7 megawatt OneSun Capital Solar Farm in the district of Coree, near Uriarra Village.

“Including the FRV Royalla Solar Farm announced in September 2012, the three solar farms will produce renewable energy, equivalent to the power needs of 10,000 Canberra households, and zero emissions,” Mr Corbell said.

“The ACT Solar Auction is delivering large scale renewable energy at an affordable price. The maximum cost to households is expected to be 45 cents per week when all three farms are operating in 2016. This is forecast to drop to 27 cents per household per week by 2021.”

I hope they look sufficiently futuristic and cool, and would be happy to work as a ‘future aesthetic consultant’ during construction if they need assistance.

What’s Your opinion?


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ACT getting two new solar farms
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Postalgeek 11:04 am 21 Oct 13

Deref said :

gooterz said :

Needs to have flywheel tech

http://www.businessandleadership.com/news/item/31557-north-americas-largest-fly

It’s well past time that we had a few of those. That item should be required reading for the fools/dupes/liars who claim that solar/wind/wave, etc. can only supply power when the sun’s shining/wind’s blowing/waves are waving, etc.

There’s all sorts of ways to store energy using solar e.g solar hydro, or pumped storage hydro, where renewable energy is used to pump water up hill during peak production, which is then used for hydroelectricity during peak use and down time.

Deref 10:48 am 21 Oct 13

gooterz said :

Needs to have flywheel tech

http://www.businessandleadership.com/news/item/31557-north-americas-largest-fly

It’s well past time that we had a few of those. That item should be required reading for the fools/dupes/liars who claim that solar/wind/wave, etc. can only supply power when the sun’s shining/wind’s blowing/waves are waving, etc.

Spiral 8:03 am 21 Oct 13

gooterz said :

We should just build the 1km solar tower and line it with apartments!

No. Not apartments. I would prefer a giant water slide.

gooterz 6:19 pm 20 Oct 13

We should just build the 1km solar tower and line it with apartments!

patrick_keogh 4:40 pm 20 Oct 13

HelenO said :

“…The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; <>.”

You don’t think that casting nimbyism as a valiant endeavour isn’t overdoing it a little?

HelenO 2:23 pm 20 Oct 13

#91 Davo 101 Said. “Did you even attempt to understand the situation before you started your rantDid you even attempt to understand the situation before you started your rant?

You gotta love armchair critics who think it’s easiest to tear down others when they themselves have attempted so little, fought for nothing and find they can fault the endeavours of others to boost their own fragile sense of self… this one from Theodore Roosevelt — about the value of “daring greatly”. It’s an excerpt of a speech he gave at Paris’s Sorbonne in April, 1910:

“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.”

davo101 4:15 pm 27 Aug 13

HelenO said :

If this solar installation is less than 50 metres from houses and there is a fire (this area is known for catastrophic fire events and extreme weather conditions) the whole village is trapped they will not be able to exit the village due to the toxic fumes from the panels and the proximity to the road. Given the direction that the winds generally blow through the village the fumes from the toxic smoke will engulf the Belconnen and Civic region within a very short space of time and will settle in lower lying areas.

I’m sorry, where does this bizarre idea that PV panels are powder kegs just waiting to explode come from? The panels are mostly glass, aluminium and silicon, which are not going to burn, with a plastic backing that’s made from a plastic chosen for it’s fire resistance.

HelenO said :

In Europe there are significant issues with cheap panels leaching toxins into the atmosphere and waterways causing untold damage to the environment.

Citation needed. I doubt this is a problem while they are in use as the PV cells are sealed inside a plastic-glass sandwich.

HelenO said :

The other issues is it is not just a case of drilling four holes in the ground putting in some poles and placing a panel on the top. 40 hectares of land will have to be bulldozed flat, huge amounts of concrete poured steel structures that will need to withstand cyclonic winds (yes the area is prone to that too) put in place to support panels that will be 2.5 metres above ground. That’s the average height of a single storey home.

Once again I doubt it. First of all they are using hydraulically inserted monopiles, so that’s one hole and no concrete. Secondly why would they bulldoze the site flat given that they have deliberately chosen a flat site to start with?

HelenO said :

EVERY TREE, shrub and plant within that area will be removed

What? They’re going to napalm every blade of grass on the site? Don’t think so.

HelenO said :

And we haven’t even started to talk about the $100,000,000 plus that will be paid by you the tax payer to the business consortia every year in feed in tariffs

Did you even attempt to understand the situation before you started your rant?

Peewee Slasher 1:26 pm 27 Aug 13

IrishPete said :

Martlark said :

That’s exactly what ACTEWAGL (or maybe it’s just AGL, I get confused by corporate shenaingans, I think that’s the point of them) were planning near Goulburn – a gas fired plant which will operate just a few days a year. http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/breaking-news/agl-suspends-dalton-construction/story-e6frf7ko-1226499549032

IP

Just to help you out Irish Pete, AGL is a privately owned company based in Sydney.
ActewAGL is half owned by the ACT guvmint. Guess which half?

Robertson 12:48 pm 27 Aug 13

HelenO said :

If this solar installation is less than 50 metres from houses and their is a fire (this area is known for catastrophic fire events and extreme weather conditions) the whole village is trapped they will not be able to exit the village due to the toxic fumes from the panels and the proximity to the road. Given the direction that the winds generally blow through the village the fumes from the toxic smoke will engulf the Belconnen and Civic region within a very short space of time and will settle in lower lying areas.

Good-%#$ing-grief.

And if it was a wind tower, you’d be worried about exploding bats and Visceral Vibratory Vestibular Disturbance Syndrome.

People like you need to be aggressively ignored. You pop up all over the place and stand in the way of getting anything done, from culling pest animals to building roads and now you are obstructing some very necessary infrastructure with reams of nonsense.

Mr Evil 12:43 pm 27 Aug 13

HelenO said :

…………this area is known for catastrophic fire events and extreme weather conditions….

All you’ve done there is reinforce the major reasons why Uriarra Village shouldn’t have been built in the first place. I believe there was a report commissioned by the ACT Government that came to the same conclusion – but as usual, whinging from some ACT Housing tenants with a sense of entitlement and lobbying from Bob Winnell/Village Building Company in the name of a ‘cheap’ money making opportunity – meant Labor caved-in, and we ended up subsidising the lifestyle choices of a very small community.

And you obviously do not realise how stupid your argument about the emissions of toxic smoke from burning solar panels is – considering just how much toxic smoke is emitted by an average house fire.

If you don’t like the solar farm’s location, maybe you should go ask Bob and VBC for your money back?

Theycallmealfo 12:31 pm 27 Aug 13

HelenO said :

The easiest way to ignore another’s opinion is to label your opponent with what is meant to be an offensive word, it makes it easier to disregard their point of view and labels them with behaviours and beliefs that do not exist. The people who live in the village work in the ACT they all lived in the suburbs you live in and simply decided to move to a new ACT suburb it just happens to be a short drive out of town.

This village is less than 30kms from the centre of Civic it is not up in the hills. It is closer to Civic than Tuggeranong is to Civic. The village supports renewable energy. It doesn’t support lack of consultation and it doesn’t support setting a precedent that could impact on any suburb in the ACT. Consider the amount of green space we have in our suburbs that could be infilled with renewable energy resources.

If this solar installation is less than 50 metres from houses and their is a fire (this area is known for catastrophic fire events and extreme weather conditions) the whole village is trapped they will not be able to exit the village due to the toxic fumes from the panels and the proximity to the road. Given the direction that the winds generally blow through the village the fumes from the toxic smoke will engulf the Belconnen and Civic region within a very short space of time and will settle in lower lying areas.

In the US and UK there are now strict guidelines for location and proximity of these installations to populations for these very reasons. In Europe there are significant issues with cheap panels leaching toxins into the atmosphere and waterways causing untold damage to the environment. This is still relatively new technology and the issues with its use are only just emerging.

The other issues is it is not just a case of drilling four holes in the ground putting in some poles and placing a panel on the top. 40 hectares of land will have to be bulldozed flat, huge amounts of concrete poured steel structures that will need to withstand cyclonic winds (yes the area is prone to that too) put in place to support panels that will be 2.5 metres above ground. That’s the average height of a single storey home.

EVERY TREE, shrub and plant within that area will be removed water catchment areas down to the river will be impacted, not only with the run off from development but if there is damage to a panel then via toxic leaching.

This installation is not the end of it the company Elementus Energy has leases 300 hectares from this property owner that is 740 acres of land, all earmarked for future development.

Large installations such as these are industrialised thinking, build a wucking great factor it’s the same concept. It is actually less damaging to place smaller safer panel units on top of every house in the ACT.

And we haven’t even started to talk about the $100,000,000 plus that will be paid by you the tax payer to the business consortiums every year in feed in tariffs agreed by the ACT government on your behalf that will go in at least 2 cases to overseas companies. Plus we will all still be paying more in electricity.

This deserves serious thought consideration and discussion.

I wish you and the Uriarra residents, and indeed the land owner (if they are willing to participate) all the best in coming to an agreement on this issue. One that may suit both parties. I hope proper consultation is given to you residents as the concerns outlined are quite valid and worrisome.
I for one wouldn’t want it that close to my house. I’ll be keeping an eye out for progress on this.

All the best.

HelenO 11:37 am 27 Aug 13

The easiest way to ignore another’s opinion is to label your opponent with what is meant to be an offensive word, it makes it easier to disregard their point of view and labels them with behaviours and beliefs that do not exist. The people who live in the village work in the ACT they all lived in the suburbs you live in and simply decided to move to a new ACT suburb it just happens to be a short drive out of town.

This village is less than 30kms from the centre of Civic it is not up in the hills. It is closer to Civic than Tuggeranong is to Civic. The village supports renewable energy. It doesn’t support lack of consultation and it doesn’t support setting a precedent that could impact on any suburb in the ACT. Consider the amount of green space we have in our suburbs that could be infilled with renewable energy resources.

If this solar installation is less than 50 metres from houses and their is a fire (this area is known for catastrophic fire events and extreme weather conditions) the whole village is trapped they will not be able to exit the village due to the toxic fumes from the panels and the proximity to the road. Given the direction that the winds generally blow through the village the fumes from the toxic smoke will engulf the Belconnen and Civic region within a very short space of time and will settle in lower lying areas.

In the US and UK there are now strict guidelines for location and proximity of these installations to populations for these very reasons. In Europe there are significant issues with cheap panels leaching toxins into the atmosphere and waterways causing untold damage to the environment. This is still relatively new technology and the issues with its use are only just emerging.

The other issues is it is not just a case of drilling four holes in the ground putting in some poles and placing a panel on the top. 40 hectares of land will have to be bulldozed flat, huge amounts of concrete poured steel structures that will need to withstand cyclonic winds (yes the area is prone to that too) put in place to support panels that will be 2.5 metres above ground. That’s the average height of a single storey home.

EVERY TREE, shrub and plant within that area will be removed water catchment areas down to the river will be impacted, not only with the run off from development but if there is damage to a panel then via toxic leaching.

This installation is not the end of it the company Elementus Energy has leases 300 hectares from this property owner that is 740 acres of land, all earmarked for future development.

Large installations such as these are industrialised thinking, build a wucking great factor it’s the same concept. It is actually less damaging to place smaller safer panel units on top of every house in the ACT.

And we haven’t even started to talk about the $100,000,000 plus that will be paid by you the tax payer to the business consortiums every year in feed in tariffs agreed by the ACT government on your behalf that will go in at least 2 cases to overseas companies. Plus we will all still be paying more in electricity.

This deserves serious thought consideration and discussion.

Theycallmealfo 11:26 am 27 Aug 13

Robertson said :

Theycallmealfo said :

If your happy to have one, why dont you suggest it? Better still write a petition, asking for it to be 50m from your place. See how many of your neighbors agree.
Sounds like you would have been happy to condemn MacArthur residents to potentially toxic fumes in their back yard. Reverse NIMBY-ism (is that even a word) is a dangerous thing – because it doesn’t effect you it should be ignored. Congratulations.

I don’t see what’s so wrong with these people expressing their concerns, asking for more information, nor asking to be consulted? Which so far they havent. Sounds like people are not apposed to the project, just it’s location being 40m from their houses, fair enough. Push it back 300 – 500m from the from of the village. Why cant their be compromise? Give people in a proven catastrophic fire area their 300-500m fire abaitment. Project still goes ahead. Everyone is happy. There is so much open land out there, why not push it back slightly?

Oh yes, gas-fired power stations emit toxic fumes.

One thing you can always rely on with NIMBYs, it’s a never-ending supply of fantasy with which to concoct their complaints.

Why should they “push it back slightly”? It’s not your land, you simply don’t get a say in how it is lawfully used, you selfish, meddling, luddite.

Your right I’m an extremely selfish individual thinking how others may be disadvantaged from this. Shame on me apparently compassion for other people is now tied with selfishness.
And i guess i dont have a right to express my conncern how this sets a precedent for any other development.
And no it’s not my land, however I do know if I wish to build something on MY land, other people and the impact it has on them must be considered. I’m not allowed to put certain things in my backyard if it impacts too much on those around me my application to do so would/could be rejected.

Like I have repeatedly stated, I’m not against solar, nor specifically the solar farm and it’s general area, more the proixmity to those who have to live with it. The land owner can still make his/her/their $$$ from having a solar farm, ACT govt can still make $$$, ACT residents can still have solar farms, if it’s put back a bit from houses.
I would be very interested in hearing from the land owner, they may have valid reasoning as to why that specific location so close to other residences was chosen, and that may be something that can be discussed by both land owner and those negatively affected. Maybe they can come to an agreement or understanding the ‘why’ behind it.

Robertson 10:04 am 27 Aug 13

Theycallmealfo said :

If your happy to have one, why dont you suggest it? Better still write a petition, asking for it to be 50m from your place. See how many of your neighbors agree.
Sounds like you would have been happy to condemn MacArthur residents to potentially toxic fumes in their back yard. Reverse NIMBY-ism (is that even a word) is a dangerous thing – because it doesn’t effect you it should be ignored. Congratulations.

I don’t see what’s so wrong with these people expressing their concerns, asking for more information, nor asking to be consulted? Which so far they havent. Sounds like people are not apposed to the project, just it’s location being 40m from their houses, fair enough. Push it back 300 – 500m from the from of the village. Why cant their be compromise? Give people in a proven catastrophic fire area their 300-500m fire abaitment. Project still goes ahead. Everyone is happy. There is so much open land out there, why not push it back slightly?

Oh yes, gas-fired power stations emit toxic fumes.

One thing you can always rely on with NIMBYs, it’s a never-ending supply of fantasy with which to concoct their complaints.

Why should they “push it back slightly”? It’s not your land, you simply don’t get a say in how it is lawfully used, you selfish, meddling, luddite.

Theycallmealfo 8:44 am 27 Aug 13

Robertson said :

c_c™ said :

If ACT govt can put a solar farm, what, 50m from these people’s houses, what’s stopping them from putting them 50m from my house, or god forbid yours? Would you want one that close, I wouldn’t.

The proximity to residential area is what I’d be concerned about. Gungahlin, look out you’ll be next

I genuinely wouldn’t have an issue with them putting them in near me.

These panels in fact will probably have less of a nasal and audible impact than the cattle that current inhabit the land. It’s not an oil recycling depot (hello Mitchell), it’s not a pest control site for animals (hello Theodore), it’s not a cell-phone tower (hello heaps of places) or a wind turbine (hello Collector).

Exactly – I’d love to see a solar farm pop up in my neighbourhood.

NIMBYs who oppose everything should be ignored. Their arguments are specious and their entire approach is ignorant and selfish.
If the Macarthur NIMBYs had been ignored, we would now have a gas-fired powerplant next to the tip producing power locally for us, providing jobs, and enabling industry.

NIMBYs will prevent any kind of progress if you let them.

If your happy to have one, why dont you suggest it? Better still write a petition, asking for it to be 50m from your place. See how many of your neighbors agree.
Sounds like you would have been happy to condemn MacArthur residents to potentially toxic fumes in their back yard. Reverse NIMBY-ism (is that even a word) is a dangerous thing – because it doesn’t effect you it should be ignored. Congratulations.

I don’t see what’s so wrong with these people expressing their concerns, asking for more information, nor asking to be consulted? Which so far they havent. Sounds like people are not apposed to the project, just it’s location being 40m from their houses, fair enough. Push it back 300 – 500m from the from of the village. Why cant their be compromise? Give people in a proven catastrophic fire area their 300-500m fire abaitment. Project still goes ahead. Everyone is happy. There is so much open land out there, why not push it back slightly?

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