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Best of Canberra taste off – Schnitzel

By Christopher Schimizzi - 10 August 2015 15

Last week I put the call out to find Canberra’s best schnitzel, or schnitty, as it’s often called.

Nominations came in for Schnitzel Haus, the RUC in Barton, Capital Golf Club and Zierholz, but the two most popular candidates were the Dickson Tradies and the Austrian Club. So I took to the streets to taste off one of my favourite foods, armed with an empty stomach, my Samsung galaxy and a couple of hungry helpers.

First stop was the Dickson Tradies. I used to love coming here as a kid (there was something about eating a schnitzel in a tram that made it even more enjoyable). Unfortunately, the tram experience is no longer available, but the quality schnitzel is.

The Tradies has a large range of schnitzels on offer, with all sorts of crazy toppings, but for the taste off I kept things simple.I ordered a chicken schnitzel (the Tradies doesn’t serve traditional veal schnitzel), with peppercorn sauce, chips and salad.

It costed $19 as a non-member, which I thought was a little steep, but members can get it for a very reasonable $12.

The Tradies upside-down love heart shaped chicken schnitzel.

The service was fast, and the schnitzel was great. For starters, it was in the shape of a love-heart, the perfect representation of my bromance with schnittys. The batter was crispy without being overcooked. The chicken was thick and juicy, not dry at all.

The pepper sauce had a good kick, and the chips were thick-cut and actually tasted like potato! The size was reasonable, but there was an option for a larger-sized schnitzel for a couple of dollars extra, so I guess I’m just schnit-picking.

The Austrian Club in Mawson was my next port of call. I love getting out to the cultural clubs in Canberra, as you’re guaranteed to get something a little different.

Pork Schnitzel from the Austrian Club, served with sauerkraut and spaetzle and made with love.

I ordered the lunch special for $14, which comes with a goulash, then a schnitzel and two sides of your choice. I again neglected tradition and chose a pork schnitzel, but could’ve also selected chicken or veal. I got it with sauerkraut and spaetzle (a type of soft egg noodle) on the side.

The schnitzel itself was divine. It was a bit crispier than the Tradies, and the meat a bit tastier. However, I think in general, pork is a tastier meat in schnitzel than chicken. The size was about the same as the Tradies, certainly not mammoth, but enough to get you full.

The sides were also seriously tasty, whilst offering a totally different style of schnitzel feed than the Tradies. The schnitzel was served with a wedge of lemon, which is traditional over the Australian preference for gravy or other sauce. The lemon provided that perfect bit of zest the dish needed. It should be noted I had to pay a $6 fee to become a member so I could eat in the restaurant.It was totally worth it, as I’ll be back soon for another round.

Interior of the Austrian Club restaurant in Mawson

This taste off pitted Australian schnitzel against Austrian schnitzel, so the verdict really comes down to which you prefer. If you’re used to the classic Australian club feed, with gravy and chips, the Austrian Club will be a welcome change for you.

But really, both schnitzel feeds were fantastic, and I would absolutely take them again in future. The winner of this taste off though has to be the Austrian Club. Hands down, cut the schnit, best schnitzel in Canberra for my taste.

What’s Your opinion?


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15 Responses to
Best of Canberra taste off – Schnitzel
ben678 8:35 am 06 Sep 15

Totally agree, iv tryed most of the schnitzel canberra has to offer and the Austrian club is the one i keep going back to. And as mess said definitely get the dumpling next time.

rubaiyat 7:06 pm 11 Aug 15

Antagonist said :

rubaiyat said :

It is not just the Austrians who do Wiener Schnitzel (not all schnitzels are Wiener).

In Italy, probably the home of the original recipe, they are called Scallopini or Cotoletta alla Milanese.

In Japan they are Tonkatsu.

Both do it well, with some stylistic variation on the Wiener Schnitzel.

I have encountered a version of Wiener Schnitzel in virtually every country I have travelled, some good, many not so.

Australians certainly have not done it proud, reducing it to deep fried pub junk food, for which it has all the potential, being meat coated in something cheap that hides the worst that the chef or trained chimp can do to their deep frozen TV dinners ala Mode.

The Aussie version bears as much resemblance to the original Wiener Schnitzel as the Fish Shop Dim Sim bears to the original Siu Mei.

I have half a mind to refer this post to the Counter-Terrorism Hotline. I’m pretty sure this is treason right here.

Proudly so! 😉

Antagonist 5:14 pm 11 Aug 15

rubaiyat said :

It is not just the Austrians who do Wiener Schnitzel (not all schnitzels are Wiener).

In Italy, probably the home of the original recipe, they are called Scallopini or Cotoletta alla Milanese.

In Japan they are Tonkatsu.

Both do it well, with some stylistic variation on the Wiener Schnitzel.

I have encountered a version of Wiener Schnitzel in virtually every country I have travelled, some good, many not so.

Australians certainly have not done it proud, reducing it to deep fried pub junk food, for which it has all the potential, being meat coated in something cheap that hides the worst that the chef or trained chimp can do to their deep frozen TV dinners ala Mode.

The Aussie version bears as much resemblance to the original Wiener Schnitzel as the Fish Shop Dim Sim bears to the original Siu Mei.

I have half a mind to refer this post to the Counter-Terrorism Hotline. I’m pretty sure this is treason right here.

astrojax 9:04 pm 10 Aug 15

Holden Caulfield said :

rubaiyat said :

It is not just the Austrians who do Wiener Schnitzel (not all schnitzels are Wiener).

In Italy, probably the home of the original recipe, they are called Scallopini or Cotoletta alla Milanese.

In Japan they are Tonkatsu.

Both do it well, with some stylistic variation on the Wiener Schnitzel.

I have encountered a version of Wiener Schnitzel in virtually every country I have travelled, some good, many not so.

Australians certainly have not done it proud, reducing it to deep fried pub junk food, for which it has all the potential, being meat coated in something cheap that hides the worst that the chef or trained chimp can do to their deep frozen TV dinners ala Mode.

The Aussie version bears as much resemblance to the original Wiener Schnitzel as the Fish Shop Dim Sim bears to the original Siu Mei.

And just like the authentic dishes you refer to, the pub schnitzel and dim sims have their place. The world would be a poorer place without schnitties and dimmies.

they go brilliantly with beer.

Holden Caulfield 8:27 pm 10 Aug 15

rubaiyat said :

It is not just the Austrians who do Wiener Schnitzel (not all schnitzels are Wiener).

In Italy, probably the home of the original recipe, they are called Scallopini or Cotoletta alla Milanese.

In Japan they are Tonkatsu.

Both do it well, with some stylistic variation on the Wiener Schnitzel.

I have encountered a version of Wiener Schnitzel in virtually every country I have travelled, some good, many not so.

Australians certainly have not done it proud, reducing it to deep fried pub junk food, for which it has all the potential, being meat coated in something cheap that hides the worst that the chef or trained chimp can do to their deep frozen TV dinners ala Mode.

The Aussie version bears as much resemblance to the original Wiener Schnitzel as the Fish Shop Dim Sim bears to the original Siu Mei.

And just like the authentic dishes you refer to, the pub schnitzel and dim sims have their place. The world would be a poorer place without schnitties and dimmies.

FarrerGirl 7:43 pm 10 Aug 15

Thinly sliced chicken or pork + flour + sour cream and egg wash + panko bread crumbs + deep fry = to die for home made schnitzel 🙂

rubaiyat 6:27 pm 10 Aug 15

It is not just the Austrians who do Wiener Schnitzel (not all schnitzels are Wiener).

In Italy, probably the home of the original recipe, they are called Scallopini or Cotoletta alla Milanese.

In Japan they are Tonkatsu.

Both do it well, with some stylistic variation on the Wiener Schnitzel.

I have encountered a version of Wiener Schnitzel in virtually every country I have travelled, some good, many not so.

Australians certainly have not done it proud, reducing it to deep fried pub junk food, for which it has all the potential, being meat coated in something cheap that hides the worst that the chef or trained chimp can do to their deep frozen TV dinners ala Mode.

The Aussie version bears as much resemblance to the original Wiener Schnitzel as the Fish Shop Dim Sim bears to the original Siu Mei.

rubaiyat 5:43 pm 10 Aug 15

Zan said :

The only place in Australia for a proper Wiener Schnitzel is at Silver Brumby Distillery near Crackenback. All other schnitzels are deep fried rubbish, imho.

I think you are referring to the Wild Brumby Distillery, but I don’t think you need to be so drastic.

The Austrian Club in Frenchs Forest, Sydney does a decent schnitzel. Pan fried and not turned into shoe leather thanks to fussy eaters and decent Philippino chefs.

My wife does an excellent schnitzel for the same reason, although she is Cantonese. 😀

Zan 4:22 pm 10 Aug 15

The only place in Australia for a proper Wiener Schnitzel is at Silver Brumby Distillery near Crackenback. All other schnitzels are deep fried rubbish, imho.

rubaiyat 3:16 pm 10 Aug 15
rubaiyat 3:15 pm 10 Aug 15
Antagonist 12:56 pm 10 Aug 15

Love the bold choice with the pork schnitty. *Stands to applause*

Mess 12:35 pm 10 Aug 15

Next time you go give the bread dumpling a try as a side. So good!

PerkyTTs 12:20 pm 10 Aug 15

I think you should continue this quest. Just sampling two contenders is not at all comprehensive.

Evilomlap 12:05 pm 10 Aug 15

Man that’s a lot of sauerkraut!

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