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Driver caught exceeding speed limit by 90km/h

By Jazz 10 October 2012 60

ACT Policing advise A 25-year-old Downer man was caught exceeding the speed limit by 90km/h on the Monaro Highway in Theodore yesterday morning (October 9).

Around 11.00am, police were conducting laser targeting when they observed a Chrysler C300 travelling at high speed. The vehicle was detected to be going 170km/hr in an 80km/hr zone.

The driver was stopped by police and issued with a Traffic Infringement Notice (TIN) for the amount of $1811 and will lose six demerit points.

When police spoke to the driver, he said it was the first time he had driven a V8 and was testing it out.

Officer-in-Charge of Tuggeranong Police Station, Sergeant Daryl Neit said that drivers who speed should consider more than just the monetary penalty.

“One of the consequences of engaging in risky behaviour such as speeding is you may receive a fine, in this case, quite a considerable one. What’s even more important to consider is that your speeding could result in the loss of your life or someone else’s,” Sergeant Neit said.

Police will continue to target speeding during the month of October.
Release Date: Wednesday, October 10 2012, 11:05 AM

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Driver caught exceeding speed limit by 90km/h
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KB1971 7:36 am 12 Oct 12

Mr_Irreverent said :

smont said :

rhino said :

Plus what’s the difference between this and doing it legally on the authobahn? Mostly just the numbers painted on the sign, the road isn’t THAT dramatically different.

Here we go with the old “it’s not that dangerous, it’s just that the speed limits are too low” argument. “Must be the fault of the bureaucrats; poor driver was just doing what comes naturally; not his fault”.

Give it a rest. We live in a civilised society; part of the deal is playing by the rules. What if every dick decided to go tearing down the Monaro Highway at 170 Kph – are you even remotely implying that that would be fine if the law allowed it?

Are you implying that the Germans are an uncivilised society? They have no speed limit on their autobahns, yet they seem to manage just fine with this arrangement.

I agree that 170 km/h on the Monaro Highway is excessive. I think this guy pushed it too far, but not as far (90 km/h over!?) as some of you would have us believe. The speed limits on many roads of the nanny state ACT are stupidly low. In many countries it is 120-130 km/h. Even in the rest of the country it is 110 km/h. But 80 km/h on a highway? Are you serious?! In NSW, that is often their roadwork speed limit on highways! Don’t get me started on the appallingly mismanaged state of roadworks in the ACT.

Whilst you might think that we should all just obey the law whatever that may be, perhaps it’s time to be a bit more critical of those who make the law. Regardless of whether this offends your sense of morals, people are going to disobey bad laws and that is a fact. If you think 80 km/h is an acceptable speed limit for a highway, that is your opinion and you are entitled to it. However, i suspect the majority of people would disagree with you.

So the old “it’s not that dangerous, it’s just that the speed limits are too low” argument I think is quite valid when considering the behaviour of the many ACT drivers who regularly exceed the speed limit on certain major roads. Perhaps if the speed limits on these roads were increased to comply with reasonable and popular opinion rather than that of the nanny state bureaucracy that runs the ACT, more people would actually respect the speed limit laws and view them as serious safety limits rather than yet another lousy scheme of the ACT government to wring more revenue out of its motorists through traffic infringements (presumably to pay for its overblown, under-managed never ending roadworks fiasco).

Mmm, you have never driven that stretch of road the? The bit near Theodore has been reduced to slow the traffic entering the roundabout on the end of Johnson drive (the traffic travelling through to Cooma has a fee lane) & then it stays at 80 for the entering traffic & returns to 100 after a driveway to a residence just up the road.

Its hardly reduced for no reason.

Dragon 10:21 pm 11 Oct 12

Dragon said :

“The driver was stopped by police and issued with a Traffic Infringement Notice (TIN) for the amount of $1811 and will lose six demerit points.”

For the 50th bloody time, you do not lose demerit points; you “incur” demerit points. The police of all people should know this. Maybe it’s time they were informed as they continually perpetuate this misconception.

For the 1000th time – ….Its punters like you who continually perpetute the misconception that the wallopers control what the CT prints !! They do not. The CT determines what the CT prints, and they are the dills who cannot seem to get their heads around the difference between accruing demerit points and ‘losing’ points……..

Point taken. I thought it was a police media release and not a Canberra Times article. My mistake. Replace ‘the police’ with ‘CT.’

Dragon 10:17 pm 11 Oct 12

LSWCHP said :

Dragon said :

“The driver was stopped by police and issued with a Traffic Infringement Notice (TIN) for the amount of $1811 and will lose six demerit points.”

For the 50th bloody time, you do not lose demerit points; you “incur” demerit points. The police of all people should know this. Maybe it’s time they were informed as they continually perpetuate this misconception.

I think you’re flogging a dead Llama there mate.

I feel the same way about grammatical solecisms. But I’ve almost managed to stop rolling my eyes at “I could of done that” and “I’m totally disinterested in this” and “that begs the question” etc. You’ll find that once you let go of the rage, you’ll feel a strange calmness descending over you.

But the rage keeps me going 😛

JimCharles 9:59 pm 11 Oct 12

rhino said :

HenryBG said :

pirate_taco said :

Perhaps if we had a motorsport facility in Canberra this bloke may have had a controlled environment in which to test out the performance capabilities of a V8.
There is a time and place for everything, but we are lacking in legal places for this type of activity.

Glen Takkenberg
Pirate Party ACT for Ginninderra

Agreed.

Agreed also.

Plus what’s the difference between this and doing it legally on the authobahn? Mostly just the numbers painted on the sign, the road isn’t THAT dramatically different.

They’re very different…no bumps, very shallow bends, wider lanes, crash barriers …they’re like concrete railways.
There was a German bloke who got caught in the UK in his Porsche….got clocked at over 300km/h on a road not even a motorway. He tried to get away with it by saying he was German and was used to that speed 🙂

Mr_Irreverent 9:30 pm 11 Oct 12

smont said :

rhino said :

Plus what’s the difference between this and doing it legally on the authobahn? Mostly just the numbers painted on the sign, the road isn’t THAT dramatically different.

Here we go with the old “it’s not that dangerous, it’s just that the speed limits are too low” argument. “Must be the fault of the bureaucrats; poor driver was just doing what comes naturally; not his fault”.

Give it a rest. We live in a civilised society; part of the deal is playing by the rules. What if every dick decided to go tearing down the Monaro Highway at 170 Kph – are you even remotely implying that that would be fine if the law allowed it?

Are you implying that the Germans are an uncivilised society? They have no speed limit on their autobahns, yet they seem to manage just fine with this arrangement.

I agree that 170 km/h on the Monaro Highway is excessive. I think this guy pushed it too far, but not as far (90 km/h over!?) as some of you would have us believe. The speed limits on many roads of the nanny state ACT are stupidly low. In many countries it is 120-130 km/h. Even in the rest of the country it is 110 km/h. But 80 km/h on a highway? Are you serious?! In NSW, that is often their roadwork speed limit on highways! Don’t get me started on the appallingly mismanaged state of roadworks in the ACT.

Whilst you might think that we should all just obey the law whatever that may be, perhaps it’s time to be a bit more critical of those who make the law. Regardless of whether this offends your sense of morals, people are going to disobey bad laws and that is a fact. If you think 80 km/h is an acceptable speed limit for a highway, that is your opinion and you are entitled to it. However, i suspect the majority of people would disagree with you.

So the old “it’s not that dangerous, it’s just that the speed limits are too low” argument I think is quite valid when considering the behaviour of the many ACT drivers who regularly exceed the speed limit on certain major roads. Perhaps if the speed limits on these roads were increased to comply with reasonable and popular opinion rather than that of the nanny state bureaucracy that runs the ACT, more people would actually respect the speed limit laws and view them as serious safety limits rather than yet another lousy scheme of the ACT government to wring more revenue out of its motorists through traffic infringements (presumably to pay for its overblown, under-managed never ending roadworks fiasco).

HenryBG 8:44 pm 11 Oct 12

Dragon said :

“The driver was stopped by police and issued with a Traffic Infringement Notice (TIN) for the amount of $1811 and will lose six demerit points.”

For the 50th bloody time, you do not lose demerit points; you “incur” demerit points. The police of all people should know this. Maybe it’s time they were informed as they continually perpetuate this misconception.

When issued a driver licence, you start with zero (0) demerit points recorded against your driver licence and demerit points are then accumulated for offences committed where demerit points are applicable.

http://www.rego.act.gov.au/infringements/infringedemerit.htm

The Antichrist 8:39 pm 11 Oct 12

what_the said :

GardeningGirl said :

“When police spoke to the driver, he said it was the first time he had driven a V8 and was testing it out.”
Sounds like a valid reason for attempted manslaughter. Idiot!

Ok, despite this statement being a complete overreaction, how does one exactly ‘attempt’ manslaughter?

The only idiot here is the one who thinks that manslaughter can occur without an actual death……FFS buy some rubber gloves and get a grip !

Dragon said :

“The driver was stopped by police and issued with a Traffic Infringement Notice (TIN) for the amount of $1811 and will lose six demerit points.”

For the 50th bloody time, you do not lose demerit points; you “incur” demerit points. The police of all people should know this. Maybe it’s time they were informed as they continually perpetuate this misconception.

For the 1000th time – ….Its punters like you who continually perpetute the misconception that the wallopers control what the CT prints !! They do not. The CT determines what the CT prints, and they are the dills who cannot seem to get their heads around the difference between accruing demerit points and ‘losing’ points……..

LSWCHP 8:35 pm 11 Oct 12

Dragon said :

“The driver was stopped by police and issued with a Traffic Infringement Notice (TIN) for the amount of $1811 and will lose six demerit points.”

For the 50th bloody time, you do not lose demerit points; you “incur” demerit points. The police of all people should know this. Maybe it’s time they were informed as they continually perpetuate this misconception.

I think you’re flogging a dead Llama there mate.

I feel the same way about grammatical solecisms. But I’ve almost managed to stop rolling my eyes at “I could of done that” and “I’m totally disinterested in this” and “that begs the question” etc. You’ll find that once you let go of the rage, you’ll feel a strange calmness descending over you.

Dragon 8:20 pm 11 Oct 12

“The driver was stopped by police and issued with a Traffic Infringement Notice (TIN) for the amount of $1811 and will lose six demerit points.”

For the 50th bloody time, you do not lose demerit points; you “incur” demerit points. The police of all people should know this. Maybe it’s time they were informed as they continually perpetuate this misconception.

IrishPete 8:19 pm 11 Oct 12
Martlark 6:49 pm 11 Oct 12

http://www.monash.edu.au/news/show/road-safety-cameras-at-intersections-save-lives-dollars

Quote:

A landmark study has found that despite the public’s perception that road safety cameras are merely revenue raising devices, they significantly reduce road accidents and so save Victoria millions of dollars annually in associated crash costs.

The Monash University Accident Research Centre (MUARC) study found that fixed digital speed and red light (FDSRL) cameras caused a decrease in casualty crashes of between 26 and 47 per cent, depending on vehicle approach, in the areas immediately surrounding their placement.

Martlark 6:47 pm 11 Oct 12

NellyBean said :

Martlark said :

NellyBean said :

I’m of the opinion that being stopped by the police in itself has a more profound effect on reducing speeding than receiving a fine a few days after the fact.

Your opinion does not coincide with research on speeding and ways to control it. Only the likely hood of being detected has deterrence value.

can you please link me to the research you speak of?

…The authors accepted a total of 35 studies for review which met the pre-set criteria. All studies reporting speed outcomes reported
a reduction in average speeds post intervention with speed cameras. Speed was also reported as either reductions in the percentage
of speeding vehicles (drivers), as percentage speeding reductions over various speed limits, or as reductions in percentages of top end
speeders. A reduction in the proportion of speeding vehicles (drivers) over the accepted posted speed limit, ranged from 8% to 70%
with most countries reporting reductions in the 10 to 35% range.
Twenty eight studies measured the effect on crashes. All 28 studies found a lower number of crashes in the speed camera areas after
implementation of the program. In the vicinity of camera sites, the reductions ranged from 8% to 49% for all crashes, with reductions
for most studies in the 14% to 25% range. For injury crashes the decrease ranged between 8% to 50% and for crashes resulting in
fatalities or serious injuries the reductions were in the range of 11% to 44%. Effects over wider areas showed reductions for all crashes
ranging from 9% to 35%, with most studies reporting reductions in the 11% to to 27% range. For crashes resulting in death or serious
injury reductions ranged from 17% to 58%, with most studies reporting this result in the 30% to 40% reduction range. The studies
of longer duration showed that these positive trends were either maintained or improved with time….

http://www.abc.net.au/mediawatch/transcripts/1133_cochrane.pdf

Jethro 5:57 pm 11 Oct 12

p1 said :

P2P cameras make me go slow for the length of the measurement zone – more effective then single point cameras, but still somewhat limited unless they whack them on every single light pole. They should allow the mobile cameras to be hidden in wheelibins, random unmarked cars, shrubberies, and the like. After the tickets start turning up in the mail from them, people will certainly change their habits.

I believe the argument against hidden speed cameras will again be ‘you are only revenue raising”. I agree, hidden speed cameras make much more sense than mobile ones that can be spotted from miles away.

No revenue is raised if you choose to obey the law. Likewise, even if they do serve a function as revenue raisers, is that an issue? You have to raise revenue somehow. Fining law breakers seems a good way to go about it.

p1 4:01 pm 11 Oct 12

Martlark said :

Your opinion does not coincide with research on speeding and ways to control it. Only the likely hood of being detected has deterrence value.

I have never received a speeding ticket (or red light ticket) issued by a camera. I know where the fixed ones are (and they have signs) and the mobile ones are predictable and visible (and they have signs). They have exactly zero impact on my driving behaviour (other then the couple of hundred metres of road the camera points at).

I have however received a couple of speeding tickets from real live cops. That wasn’t fun – partly due to the fine and points, partly due having to stand by the side of the road with a cop car and not amused policeman¹. In each case I didn’t see the police until they had measured my speed and decided to pursue me. The memory of that does have some impact on my driving.

P2P cameras make me go slow for the length of the measurement zone – more effective then single point cameras, but still somewhat limited unless they whack them on every single light pole. They should allow the mobile cameras to be hidden in wheelibins, random unmarked cars, shrubberies, and the like. After the tickets start turning up in the mail from them, people will certainly change their habits. And the only reason they don’t do this seems to be some issue with it being “fair”, which is a weird concept to apply to enforcing a law supposedly in place for public safety reasons?

1 - Actually, having to go home and tell Mrs P1 was a much less pleasant experience - especially the second time.

KB1971 3:44 pm 11 Oct 12

HenryBG said :

Jethro said :

54-11 said :

A speed camera would have stopped him on the spot, of course.

A permanent P2P speed camera would have greatly reduced the likelihood of him doing it because he would know he was guaranteed of getting caught and fined.

There is a P2P speed camera on the Monaro at Hume. Doesn’t appear to have stopped him.

Maybe we need P2P speed cameras every 200m along the Monaro?
Or would it be cheaper to build them a speedway?

Um, no there isnt, there is a fixed speed camera either side of the road.They are different to the point to point jobbies. Unless you are talking about the one from Bredbo to Cooma……..

bundah 3:12 pm 11 Oct 12

#36
Not unlike attempted culpable driving 🙂

Henry82 2:25 pm 11 Oct 12

$1800 of post-tax money, thanks for your donation

NellyBean 2:07 pm 11 Oct 12

Martlark said :

NellyBean said :

I’m of the opinion that being stopped by the police in itself has a more profound effect on reducing speeding than receiving a fine a few days after the fact.

Your opinion does not coincide with research on speeding and ways to control it. Only the likely hood of being detected has deterrence value.

can you please link me to the research you speak of?

Martlark 1:33 pm 11 Oct 12

NellyBean said :

I’m of the opinion that being stopped by the police in itself has a more profound effect on reducing speeding than receiving a fine a few days after the fact.

Your opinion does not coincide with research on speeding and ways to control it. Only the likely hood of being detected has deterrence value.

Jethro 12:32 pm 11 Oct 12

HenryBG said :

Maybe we need P2P speed cameras every 200m along the Monaro?
Or would it be cheaper to build them a speedway?

I thought the argument the anti-P2P brigade trotted out is that they are nothing more than revenue raisers…. now apparently they are prohibitively expensive.

I’m not against building a speedway either. Although i doubt it’s going to stop the anti-social hoons using our roads to prove their manhood.

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