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New dog trucks for when Fido breaks free

By johnboy 8 January 2014 47

dog trucks

TAMS are celebrating the arrival of all singing and dancing dog catching trucks:

Domestic Animal Services (DAS) has received two new state-of-the-art vehicles that will make conditions safer and more comfortable for dogs being transported, while also limiting the risk to rangers by reducing the need to handle heavy or aggressive dogs.

Manager of Licensing and Compliance Michael Brice said the new vehicles will help DAS deliver a better service to the community.

“The new state-of-the-art trucks are capable of transporting up to seven dogs ranging from big to small, all in separate cages. They also include a cage system which can be lowered to street level, reducing manual handling and heavy lifting, to make the vehicle safer for dogs and rangers,” Mr Brice said.

“Lifting a large dog into the back of a vehicle can be difficult, and if the dog is dangerous there can be a risk to the ranger and the animal. As the new vehicle can lower two of its cages to the ground, rangers can simply walk the animal into the back of the vehicle and secure it. The cage can then be repositioned on the back of the vehicle using a winch.”

Mr Brice said the new truck would be particularly handy over the upcoming holiday period, when DAS rangers generally collect more stray dogs, as pet owners go on holiday and leave their pets at home.

[Photo supplied]


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New dog trucks for when Fido breaks free
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Pork Hunt 3:01 pm 12 Jan 14

maxblues said :

A case of old dogs, new trucks?

He said with his best Kiwi eccent…

IrishPete 11:15 am 12 Jan 14

On the subtopic of popularity of various breeds, serendipitously this is in the CT today http://www.canberratimes.com.au/act-news/one-in-six-act-households-keeps-a-pet-dog-20140111-30o19.html

Interesting that “lifetime registration” has unintentionally meant dogs remain registered after death, and in the ACT inter-state moves would be an issue too.

IP

Pitchka 3:39 pm 10 Jan 14

Ghettosmurf87 said :

Queen_of_the_Bun said :

Madam Cholet said :

I’m wondering why DAS were not running on some kind of skeleton staff?

Because the dogs would run away with the bones?

I laughed *thumbs up*

Thanks for fixing the quote, as it made no sence when it was posted after my response. I was wondering WTF she was on about. 🙂

maxblues 3:37 pm 10 Jan 14

A case of old dogs, new trucks?

ausbradr 1:32 pm 10 Jan 14

Looks like a solution ACT Policing could use in response to alcohol fuelled violence as well, by night.

Ghettosmurf87 12:59 pm 10 Jan 14

Queen_of_the_Bun said :

Madam Cholet said :

I’m wondering why DAS were not running on some kind of skeleton staff?

Because the dogs would run away with the bones?

I laughed *thumbs up*

Watson 11:17 am 10 Jan 14

IrishPete said :

No, you didn’t say anything about dogs that cause mayhem then sneak home and no-one ever knows, which is why someone else had to say something. It’s not just a rural issue – it’s a problem on the urban fringe, and for wildlife it’s a problem throughout Canberra. You did imply there’s no big deal about Fido getting out and coming home bored. There is a big deal. Few dogs are complete angels when left to their own devices, even less so when they meet up with a mate or two.

It’s great you use your best efforts to keep your dog in, not everyone does.

I’m not trivialising problems caused by irresponsible owners. I’m just saying that multiplying the number of rangers by 3 so they can go pick up each and every dog that gets out is just not feasible and I also don’t regard it as the most effective way to deal with the problem.

Personally, I am a proponent of a licence for dog owners. Linked to mandatory lessons and/or a test to ensure they know how to train and look after their dogs, plus having to prove that your dog is desexed. Way too many dogs are kept as backyard ornaments in Canberra and they are the ones that will usually cause the most trouble if they get out. Especially if they are undesexed too. Untrained teenage dogs also make up the majority of surrendered dogs.

It would require a significant boost to the budget initially but would be more cost effective in the long run, I’m pretty sure. But I know I am sounding very naive now… One can dream though. I work for pet rescue, so it’s an issue that really gets to me.

Queen_of_the_Bun 9:18 am 10 Jan 14

Pitchka said :

Madam Cholet said :

I’m wondering why DAS were not running on some kind of skeleton staff?

Not my first woeful experience of DAS.

Because much like you, DAS staff are entitlted to time off, believe it or not.

How about you volunteer to man the compound on PH’s, answer phone calls and catch stray dogs… Or better yet, locate the pets owners and lecture them on how to be responsible pet owners, instead of blaming the DAS staff for pet owners incompitence.

Because the dogs would run away with the bones?

Pitchka 8:24 am 10 Jan 14

IrishPete said :

Pitchka said :

Madam Cholet said :

I’m wondering why DAS were not running on some kind of skeleton staff?

Not my first woeful experience of DAS.

Because much like you, DAS staff are entitlted to time off, believe it or not.

How about you volunteer to man the compound on PH’s, answer phone calls and catch stray dogs… Or better yet, locate the pets owners and lecture them on how to be responsible pet owners, instead of blaming the DAS staff for pet owners incompitence.

It’s a job, dude, chill out. They get paid double time on public holidays. They get on-call allowance, and all the Scooby snacks they can eat.

Pitchka said :

Madam Cholet said :

I’m wondering why DAS were not running on some kind of skeleton staff?

Not my first woeful experience of DAS.

Because much like you, DAS staff are entitlted to time off, believe it or not.

How about you volunteer to man the compound on PH’s, answer phone calls and catch stray dogs… Or better yet, locate the pets owners and lecture them on how to be responsible pet owners, instead of blaming the DAS staff for pet owners incompitence.

It’s a job, dude, chill out. They get paid double time on public holidays. They get on-call allowance, and all the Scooby snacks they can eat. (Okay, I can’t be sure all of that is true.) i’ve heard it can be a shitty job, for example having to catch the dog that is protecting it’s suicided owner, so that you are the first person in the room, before police, paramedics or anyone else. Probably not what they expected when they took the job.

IP

And then there are those who dont give a rats ass about the $$, and simply want some time off, which as i stated, they too are entitled to.

IrishPete 10:49 pm 09 Jan 14

Pitchka said :

Madam Cholet said :

I’m wondering why DAS were not running on some kind of skeleton staff?

Not my first woeful experience of DAS.

Because much like you, DAS staff are entitlted to time off, believe it or not.

How about you volunteer to man the compound on PH’s, answer phone calls and catch stray dogs… Or better yet, locate the pets owners and lecture them on how to be responsible pet owners, instead of blaming the DAS staff for pet owners incompitence.

It’s a job, dude, chill out. They get paid double time on public holidays. They get on-call allowance, and all the Scooby snacks they can eat. (Okay, I can’t be sure all of that is true.) i’ve heard it can be a shitty job, for example having to catch the dog that is protecting it’s suicided owner, so that you are the first person in the room, before police, paramedics or anyone else. Probably not what they expected when they took the job.

IP

IrishPete 10:44 pm 09 Jan 14

Watson said :

vet111 said :

IrishPete said :

Watson said :

Some dogs are just stupid or not trained or both and will get into trouble when out on their own. Most will go back home when they’ve had enough of sniffing around, in time for dinner.

…or when they get bored with killing sheep, cats, wildlife, children. Keep your dogs in folks, or risk having them shot and getting an expensive bill for lost livestock or vet bills.

IP

A massive +1 for that. I live in a rural area, and I’m sick of being scared to go out of my own front yard for fear of getting bailed up yet again by the neighbour’s dog. I’m sure he’s friendly to you, but I’m now forced into a position of having to get someone to shoot him because he sure ain’t friendly to me, and you refuse to secure him.

Did I say anything about dogs that bail you up or kill sheep or children? The rangers will come out for aggressive or threatening dogs. That is a totally different scenario to a dog that accidentally got out of his yard and is minding his own business. I also didn’t say it was ok to let your dogs knowingly roam the streets. But sometimes, despite your best efforts, your dog can find himself on the wrong side of your gate without you.

No, you didn’t say anything about dogs that cause mayhem then sneak home and no-one ever knows, which is why someone else had to say something. It’s not just a rural issue – it’s a problem on the urban fringe, and for wildlife it’s a problem throughout Canberra. You did imply there’s no big deal about Fido getting out and coming home bored. There is a big deal. Few dogs are complete angels when left to their own devices, even less so when they meet up with a mate or two.

It’s great you use your best efforts to keep your dog in, not everyone does.

IrishPete 10:37 pm 09 Jan 14

TinyTank said :

IrishPete said :

Oh dear, here goes again.

I’d love to know the sample size from the WA study – how many dog bites can there have been in 14 months in Perth? And surely only the very serious or the very local ones would have gone to the specialist children’s hospital? Small sample size means unreliable results.

I note the original publication (which I cannot find) appears not to have been published in a peer-reviewed publication (like a journal). Generally a bad sign.

The study makes not attempt to compare the frequency of bites with how common the breed of dog is. So if 14.3% of bites were by Blue Heelers, but Blue Heelers make up 20% of all dogs, then Blue Heelers are safer than dogs on average. On the other hand if Rotties are only 1% of dogs but are responsible for 4.9% of bites, then they are much more dangerous than dogs on average. (A rate per 1000 dogs or something like that would have to be calculated to do this properly.)

So put simply, the Kidsafe statistics are meaningless. What they say to me is that Kelpies and Blue Heelers are the most common dogs.

I also gets my hackles up (haha) when someone reports percentages to two decimal places – unless your sample is in the thousands that is totally unnecessary, and presents a spurious level of accuracy. When I see overuse of decimal places, alarm bells ring.

Finally, the research says nothing about the seriousness of the injuries. Your average Jack Russell might inflict a near-fatal nip. Your average Rotty might leave nothing for the relatives to bury.

Although Staffies are gorgeous with their owners and families, they are also very protective, so they may not be so good with people they do not know. Also many people get hurt trying to separate dogs that are fighting, and I’ve experienced how hard it can be to separate a Staffie, though admittedly it was my Staffie-Kelpie Cross that had done a lockjaw on her Staffie best friend (because he hadn’t treated her with sufficient respect, or something – who knows what had slighted her)! A few days later the Staffie bit one of “its” children – why? Because the child was hugging it and it was sore from the incident with my dog; he had already given the child a warning growl but she had not understood. My Cross I trusted absolutely – I used to leave her in my convertible, top down, unrestrained outside shops, and she’d stay there until I returned. Didn’t matter how long. I bought a dishwasher once, and the dishwasher box got put over the dog and a 4yo boy and they played happily inside for ages – all you could hear was thump thump thump of Staffy tail (cos that’s what she had) on inside of cardboard box. But I probably wouldn’t do that these days unless the dog and child had grown up together (these two hadn’t).

IP

Apologies for causing exasperation IP. My point (and personal opinion) was that Blue Heelers are the bitey ones over other breeds, but as I said, it was probably my fault anyway.

Sorry, i wasn’t expressing frustration at you, more at myself for going into another rant about crappy research. Yes, clearly heelers are a bit bitey, but this research doesn’t tell us if they are more bitey than other breeds. But on the other hand, they clearly aren’t totally safe either. When you see a heeler or kelpie in action, doing what they are bred to do, it is no surprise. My kelpie bites me! Play bites, but I’m bigger than her. I don’t bite back – she moults too much, and sometimes has rolled in stuff.

    johnboy 10:41 pm 09 Jan 14

    Anecdotal I know but some of the most bitey dogs I’ve known have been heelers.

    There’s a lot of dingo in australian working dogs and while i love my kelpies to bits it pays to keep an eye out for the wild dog in them.

vet111 3:45 pm 09 Jan 14

Watson said :

vet111 said :

IrishPete said :

Watson said :

Some dogs are just stupid or not trained or both and will get into trouble when out on their own. Most will go back home when they’ve had enough of sniffing around, in time for dinner.

…or when they get bored with killing sheep, cats, wildlife, children. Keep your dogs in folks, or risk having them shot and getting an expensive bill for lost livestock or vet bills.

IP

A massive +1 for that. I live in a rural area, and I’m sick of being scared to go out of my own front yard for fear of getting bailed up yet again by the neighbour’s dog. I’m sure he’s friendly to you, but I’m now forced into a position of having to get someone to shoot him because he sure ain’t friendly to me, and you refuse to secure him.

Did I say anything about dogs that bail you up or kill sheep or children? The rangers will come out for aggressive or threatening dogs. That is a totally different scenario to a dog that accidentally got out of his yard and is minding his own business. I also didn’t say it was ok to let your dogs knowingly roam the streets. But sometimes, despite your best efforts, your dog can find himself on the wrong side of your gate without you.

Way to take a comment out of context.

In an urban setting, the occasional escapee is generally no harm, no foul. In rural settings, most reasonable people (like myself) allow the owner a chance to rectify the problem. However when it’s an ongoing issue and no attempt has been made to fix the problem, it’s the dog that loses. Which is really sad.

Pitchka 2:39 pm 09 Jan 14

Madam Cholet said :

Not my first woeful experience of DAS.

Perhaps your owner should microchip you then, would save you having to spend the night in the compound.

Pitchka 2:37 pm 09 Jan 14

Madam Cholet said :

I’m wondering why DAS were not running on some kind of skeleton staff?

Not my first woeful experience of DAS.

Because much like you, DAS staff are entitlted to time off, believe it or not.

How about you volunteer to man the compound on PH’s, answer phone calls and catch stray dogs… Or better yet, locate the pets owners and lecture them on how to be responsible pet owners, instead of blaming the DAS staff for pet owners incompitence.

Watson 2:20 pm 09 Jan 14

vet111 said :

IrishPete said :

Watson said :

Some dogs are just stupid or not trained or both and will get into trouble when out on their own. Most will go back home when they’ve had enough of sniffing around, in time for dinner.

…or when they get bored with killing sheep, cats, wildlife, children. Keep your dogs in folks, or risk having them shot and getting an expensive bill for lost livestock or vet bills.

IP

A massive +1 for that. I live in a rural area, and I’m sick of being scared to go out of my own front yard for fear of getting bailed up yet again by the neighbour’s dog. I’m sure he’s friendly to you, but I’m now forced into a position of having to get someone to shoot him because he sure ain’t friendly to me, and you refuse to secure him.

Did I say anything about dogs that bail you up or kill sheep or children? The rangers will come out for aggressive or threatening dogs. That is a totally different scenario to a dog that accidentally got out of his yard and is minding his own business. I also didn’t say it was ok to let your dogs knowingly roam the streets. But sometimes, despite your best efforts, your dog can find himself on the wrong side of your gate without you.

TinyTank 2:15 pm 09 Jan 14

IrishPete said :

Oh dear, here goes again.

I’d love to know the sample size from the WA study – how many dog bites can there have been in 14 months in Perth? And surely only the very serious or the very local ones would have gone to the specialist children’s hospital? Small sample size means unreliable results.

I note the original publication (which I cannot find) appears not to have been published in a peer-reviewed publication (like a journal). Generally a bad sign.

The study makes not attempt to compare the frequency of bites with how common the breed of dog is. So if 14.3% of bites were by Blue Heelers, but Blue Heelers make up 20% of all dogs, then Blue Heelers are safer than dogs on average. On the other hand if Rotties are only 1% of dogs but are responsible for 4.9% of bites, then they are much more dangerous than dogs on average. (A rate per 1000 dogs or something like that would have to be calculated to do this properly.)

So put simply, the Kidsafe statistics are meaningless. What they say to me is that Kelpies and Blue Heelers are the most common dogs.

I also gets my hackles up (haha) when someone reports percentages to two decimal places – unless your sample is in the thousands that is totally unnecessary, and presents a spurious level of accuracy. When I see overuse of decimal places, alarm bells ring.

Finally, the research says nothing about the seriousness of the injuries. Your average Jack Russell might inflict a near-fatal nip. Your average Rotty might leave nothing for the relatives to bury.

Although Staffies are gorgeous with their owners and families, they are also very protective, so they may not be so good with people they do not know. Also many people get hurt trying to separate dogs that are fighting, and I’ve experienced how hard it can be to separate a Staffie, though admittedly it was my Staffie-Kelpie Cross that had done a lockjaw on her Staffie best friend (because he hadn’t treated her with sufficient respect, or something – who knows what had slighted her)! A few days later the Staffie bit one of “its” children – why? Because the child was hugging it and it was sore from the incident with my dog; he had already given the child a warning growl but she had not understood. My Cross I trusted absolutely – I used to leave her in my convertible, top down, unrestrained outside shops, and she’d stay there until I returned. Didn’t matter how long. I bought a dishwasher once, and the dishwasher box got put over the dog and a 4yo boy and they played happily inside for ages – all you could hear was thump thump thump of Staffy tail (cos that’s what she had) on inside of cardboard box. But I probably wouldn’t do that these days unless the dog and child had grown up together (these two hadn’t).

IP

Apologies for causing exasperation IP. My point (and personal opinion) was that Blue Heelers are the bitey ones over other breeds, but as I said, it was probably my fault anyway.

vet111 1:36 pm 09 Jan 14

IrishPete said :

Watson said :

Some dogs are just stupid or not trained or both and will get into trouble when out on their own. Most will go back home when they’ve had enough of sniffing around, in time for dinner.

…or when they get bored with killing sheep, cats, wildlife, children. Keep your dogs in folks, or risk having them shot and getting an expensive bill for lost livestock or vet bills.

IP

A massive +1 for that. I live in a rural area, and I’m sick of being scared to go out of my own front yard for fear of getting bailed up yet again by the neighbour’s dog. I’m sure he’s friendly to you, but I’m now forced into a position of having to get someone to shoot him because he sure ain’t friendly to me, and you refuse to secure him.

IrishPete 12:34 pm 09 Jan 14

Watson said :

Some dogs are just stupid or not trained or both and will get into trouble when out on their own. Most will go back home when they’ve had enough of sniffing around, in time for dinner.

…or when they get bored with killing sheep, cats, wildlife, children. Keep your dogs in folks, or risk having them shot and getting an expensive bill for lost livestock or vet bills.

IP

IrishPete 12:24 pm 09 Jan 14

Oh dear, here goes again.

I’d love to know the sample size from the WA study – how many dog bites can there have been in 14 months in Perth? And surely only the very serious or the very local ones would have gone to the specialist children’s hospital? Small sample size means unreliable results.

I note the original publication (which I cannot find) appears not to have been published in a peer-reviewed publication (like a journal). Generally a bad sign.

The study makes not attempt to compare the frequency of bites with how common the breed of dog is. So if 14.3% of bites were by Blue Heelers, but Blue Heelers make up 20% of all dogs, then Blue Heelers are safer than dogs on average. On the other hand if Rotties are only 1% of dogs but are responsible for 4.9% of bites, then they are much more dangerous than dogs on average. (A rate per 1000 dogs or something like that would have to be calculated to do this properly.)

So put simply, the Kidsafe statistics are meaningless. What they say to me is that Kelpies and Blue Heelers are the most common dogs.

I also gets my hackles up (haha) when someone reports percentages to two decimal places – unless your sample is in the thousands that is totally unnecessary, and presents a spurious level of accuracy. When I see overuse of decimal places, alarm bells ring.

Finally, the research says nothing about the seriousness of the injuries. Your average Jack Russell might inflict a near-fatal nip. Your average Rotty might leave nothing for the relatives to bury.

Although Staffies are gorgeous with their owners and families, they are also very protective, so they may not be so good with people they do not know. Also many people get hurt trying to separate dogs that are fighting, and I’ve experienced how hard it can be to separate a Staffie, though admittedly it was my Staffie-Kelpie Cross that had done a lockjaw on her Staffie best friend (because he hadn’t treated her with sufficient respect, or something – who knows what had slighted her)! A few days later the Staffie bit one of “its” children – why? Because the child was hugging it and it was sore from the incident with my dog; he had already given the child a warning growl but she had not understood. My Cross I trusted absolutely – I used to leave her in my convertible, top down, unrestrained outside shops, and she’d stay there until I returned. Didn’t matter how long. I bought a dishwasher once, and the dishwasher box got put over the dog and a 4yo boy and they played happily inside for ages – all you could hear was thump thump thump of Staffy tail (cos that’s what she had) on inside of cardboard box. But I probably wouldn’t do that these days unless the dog and child had grown up together (these two hadn’t).

IP

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