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New education policy? – actually just consultation on school leaving ages

By johnboy - 18 August 2008 24

[First filed: August 18, 2008 @ 09:59]

Apparently we’re getting a new education system today when the relevant powers bestir themselves to release it.

Early TV reports suggest the school leaving age will be raised to 17, but more vocational/trades education will be made available.

That will mean a lot more kids in school who really don’t want to be there. We’ll have to see if adequate funding to cope will also arrive.

UPDATED: Minister for Education and Training Andrew Barr has announced a new consultation paper:

    Pathways to the future – a consultation paper on increasing young people’s engagement in education, training and work asks young people, their parents, carers, teachers and the wider ACT community about raising the school leaving age above 15 years and how this may be best done.
    “The school leaving age was last raised in 1943 when ACT schools were part of the NSW system. Our society, economy and schools have changed dramatically since then,” Mr Barr said.

    “Some research suggests that early school leavers are more likely to become long-term unemployed adults and to earn less when they are employed. Other research finds that productivity growth will be significantly raised by investments in school retention. So it’s important we ensure students are better prepared for an economy that requires higher skill levels than in the past and research suggests raising the school leaving age could be an important part of this.

Not entirely sure they aren’t confusing correlation with causation there.

School leaving age

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24 Responses to
New education policy? – actually just consultation on school leaving ages
Jazz 4:01 pm 18 Aug 08

I have thought for some time now that there should be the facility in our schools to start the elements of a trade as part of the curriculum, not something seperate and only for those that dont excell academically.

For those that go on to tertiary studies or academic vocation they’ve alwasy got a partial skill base on which to fall back, and for those not so inclined it builds up a base of skills for which to find employment or further qualifications in a trade.

It also gives some relevance to those other subjects that students might otherwise hate, such as maths, english or science if they can see its association with the trade they are studying along side it.

staria 3:28 pm 18 Aug 08

jakez said :

I really cannot see the point in making students stay in school until they reach 17.

Let’s face it, at 15 they either have a decent education or they don’t. If they don’t then they will get absolutely nothing out of the next two years at school. Let them make their own choices with their parents and go into a trade or something of that nature.

Forcing them to stay is just wasting everyone’s time and money.

While I agree that having kids that don’t want to be at school can be disruptive to those who do want to be there, if leaving age is 15 – what then? I firmly believe in that you should work or you study till you can work – the dole is only there for emergencies. If you can line up an apprenticeship when you’re 15 then all well and good, but for those who can’t, then school should still be on the cards. There just needs to be more options for those who do not want to go to uni. I realise this is a bit simplistic and doesn’t cover every single situation, but I think it’s a good rule of thumb nonetheless, and should apply to people of all ages.

Having said that about work or study, I think the austudy (or whatever it may be when you’re older) rate should be brought more into line with unemployment benefits to support this.

jakez 1:07 pm 18 Aug 08

Skidbladnir said :

Mr Evil said :

Morgan said :

In reality what can they do to you if you are 15 and never turn up at school?

Send them to work as a policy adviser for an ACT MLA?

Pretty close.
Not policy, but think closer to ‘senior’ adviser level for a party candidate.
(And I know they read this site too, so I expect to hear about what “Some loser on RiotACT said” eventually)

We can’t have people with a higher than Grade 10 education working for our MLAs, otherwise the employees will be smarter than the employers.

Skidbladnir 12:47 pm 18 Aug 08

Mr Evil said :

Morgan said :

In reality what can they do to you if you are 15 and never turn up at school?

Send them to work as a policy adviser for an ACT MLA?

Pretty close.
Not policy, but think closer to ‘senior’ adviser level for a party candidate.
(And I know they read this site too, so I expect to hear about what “Some loser on RiotACT said” eventually)

peterh 12:12 pm 18 Aug 08

peterh said :

there is a survey on the DET website – http://www.det.act.gov.au/forms/pathways_to_the_future

aaah! this is for “community consultation”….

Thumper 12:10 pm 18 Aug 08

I yearn for the good old days when you could stick them in a coal mine or a cotton factory at the age of 5.

That sorted them out…

Mr Evil 12:03 pm 18 Aug 08

Morgan said :

In reality what can they do to you if you are 15 and never turn up at school? Expell you?

Send them to work as a policy adviser for an ACT MLA?

peterh 12:00 pm 18 Aug 08

there is a survey on the DET website – http://www.det.act.gov.au/forms/pathways_to_the_future

Granny 11:49 am 18 Aug 08

I think it may be wise to wait and see what the policy actually says. Sometimes ideas can make more sense when they are put into a wider context.

Morgan 11:41 am 18 Aug 08

In reality what can they do to you if you are 15 and never turn up at school? Expell you?

Whatsup 11:36 am 18 Aug 08

Just what we need, more young people forced to stay at school disrupting those who want to be there. What a load of rubbish !

jakez 11:33 am 18 Aug 08

I really cannot see the point in making students stay in school until they reach 17.

Let’s face it, at 15 they either have a decent education or they don’t. If they don’t then they will get absolutely nothing out of the next two years at school. Let them make their own choices with their parents and go into a trade or something of that nature.

Forcing them to stay is just wasting everyone’s time and money.

peterh 10:49 am 18 Aug 08

Thumper said :

I would have been stuffed.

Due to the vagaries of UK and USA schooling I finished year 12 at the tender age of 16.

i finished college at the age of 17, just ready to go into my apprenticeship…..

Thumper 10:46 am 18 Aug 08

I would have been stuffed.

Due to the vagaries of UK and USA schooling I finished year 12 at the tender age of 16.

peterh 10:34 am 18 Aug 08

oh, great. and who will police the leaving age? with apprentice entry usually around 16-17, i would have thought the govt would be fine with 17 as the college finishing age.

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