Shooting dogs in Dunlop

johnboy 10 September 2013 28

A dog has been injured after being shot by ACT Policing following an attack of up to three people earlier this evening (Tuesday, September 10).

Around 5.55pm members from Belconnen Police Station responded to a report of a tan-coloured dog attacking a number of people in the area between Fassifern Pond and Jarramlee Pond in Dunlop.

A 17-year-old male had clothing ripped as the dog attempted to bite him while another man was bitten by the dog, drawing blood, when he went to the rescue of a woman who was ‘bailed-up’ by the attacking dog.

The Sergeant discharged his firearm, injuring the dog. The dog retreated to a nearby home where it was contained to the backyard until the owner returned home.

The dog has been taken to the vet for treatment.

[Courtesy ACT Policing]


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Thumper Thumper 1:13 pm 13 Sep 13

– if said dog was happily running toward you with tongue hanging out anticipating a hug and a lick, then you whack it across the head delivering a deadly blow, would the owners be within their rights to have you up on charges of cruelty?

I’d hate to see that. In fact I hate to see any animal harmed.

Except in this case where the dog was an obvious danger. It’s sad that the dog was shot but imagine if a small child had wandered by?

Grimm Grimm 12:57 pm 13 Sep 13

Gerry-Built said :

Apparently on ABC news radio, they reported 16 shots were fired… Funny… I didn’t hear a thing; and I live quite close…

Priceless. Had a full mag and 1 up the spout and couldn’t kill a dog.

That many rounds off target is just outright dangerous. This is why they should be required to do more shooting than qualifying once a year…

wildturkeycanoe wildturkeycanoe 12:55 pm 13 Sep 13

shirty_bear said :

wildturkeycanoe said :

Question for the hive mind – Imagine you are in an off-leash area, a sports ground with cricket nets and you are practicing cricket with two young kids.

This may be simplistic, but I wouldn’t have thought that any public sports grounds (especially with facilities such as cricket nets) wouls also be classified as off-leash areas. I would expect all officially off-leash areas to be better isolated, or scrubland.
My suspicion is that the dog owners in this case are breaking the rules. Regardless, they’re being douchebags by doing this with dogs that are not well trained.
I would also suggest that, under threat of attack, you’re entitled to take whatever measure you see fit to protect your kids. Cricket bat seems ideal.

Oddly, if you look at TAMS maps to see where the off leash areas are, sports grounds appear to be okay. The rules state that there aren’t to be people training there at the time, that dogs must be leashed in that circumstance.
I would definitely use a bat for defense, but looking at it from another point of view – if said dog was happily running toward you with tongue hanging out anticipating a hug and a lick, then you whack it across the head delivering a deadly blow, would the owners be within their rights to have you up on charges of cruelty?

Gerry-Built Gerry-Built 11:12 am 13 Sep 13

Apparently on ABC news radio, they reported 16 shots were fired… Funny… I didn’t hear a thing; and I live quite close…

shirty_bear shirty_bear 10:32 am 13 Sep 13

wildturkeycanoe said :

Question for the hive mind – Imagine you are in an off-leash area, a sports ground with cricket nets and you are practicing cricket with two young kids.

This may be simplistic, but I wouldn’t have thought that any public sports grounds (especially with facilities such as cricket nets) wouls also be classified as off-leash areas. I would expect all officially off-leash areas to be better isolated, or scrubland.
My suspicion is that the dog owners in this case are breaking the rules. Regardless, they’re being douchebags by doing this with dogs that are not well trained.
I would also suggest that, under threat of attack, you’re entitled to take whatever measure you see fit to protect your kids. Cricket bat seems ideal.

Thumper Thumper 9:50 am 13 Sep 13

wildturkeycanoe said :

Question for the hive mind – Imagine you are in an off-leash area, a sports ground with cricket nets and you are practicing cricket with two young kids. There are people about 100m away playing with their 2 “pit-bull” style dogs. The dogs decide to run across the oval and join in to your cricket practice whilst the owners just stand there yelling at the dogs, not even bothering to chase after them. How do you as a parent react to this, not knowing what the dogs are like, except obviously deaf or disobedient? All I could do was try to shield my youngest by putting myself between him and the dog and yelling at it to go away. This sort of worked, but thankfully the other dog went to annoy the people next to us and the second one followed. Eventually the dogs responded and went back to their owners, but it left me remembering what happened to my eldest son a long time ago as a toddler. A supposedly timid pet chased him down and scratched him on the back of his leg, then jumped up onto me and bit the back of his leg whilst I was trying to hold him up as high as I could off the ground to safety. I learned later that someone else had pretty much trained the dog to chase and nip him on the legs through teasing, just for fun. Since then, any unknown mutt that approaches is enemy #1. Defending against one dog might be a difficult task enough, but two is way too much, when a 6 year old is involved.
Obviously in leash free areas, the dogs should be under the control of their owners. If the dogs don’t respond to “come here”, I’d say that is out of control.
Any ideas on what to do when the panic sets in as a four legged rabbit trap or two charge your way and you have little ones to protect?

As someone who has been attacked by a crazed bull terrier, which at the time was attacking another two dogs and an old woman and took exception to me trying to stop it, I would not hesitate to beat the dog to death.

The look in that dog’s eye was terrifying, something primeval. I had to choke it until unconcious, throw it as far as possible and then run like hell.

Yep, terrifying…

Grimm Grimm 9:21 am 13 Sep 13

buzz819 said :

midlife said :

Police use a solid load in their ammo so there is a clean entry and possibly exit. The bullet does not do as much damage as a hollow head which deforms and causes more damage as it passes through increasing the chances of a fatal shot. In an animal it seems to require a hit to a fundamental part to kill them. Police are always at a disadvantage when it comes to fire power. Baddies seem to acquire the more effective equipment as they are not bound by rules.

I think you will find that Police do in fact use a hollow point, metal jacket round.

The reason? They don’t want the bullet to go through the person they are shooting at.

Military normally use the solid load ammo.

It’s a Winchester 147gn, copper jacketed soft point. They very rarely exit.

The military are required to use FMJ projectiles under the Hague convention.

buzz819 buzz819 6:22 am 13 Sep 13

midlife said :

Police use a solid load in their ammo so there is a clean entry and possibly exit. The bullet does not do as much damage as a hollow head which deforms and causes more damage as it passes through increasing the chances of a fatal shot. In an animal it seems to require a hit to a fundamental part to kill them. Police are always at a disadvantage when it comes to fire power. Baddies seem to acquire the more effective equipment as they are not bound by rules.

I think you will find that Police do in fact use a hollow point, metal jacket round.

The reason? They don’t want the bullet to go through the person they are shooting at.

Military normally use the solid load ammo.

LSWCHP LSWCHP 10:58 pm 12 Sep 13

wildturkeycanoe said :

Question for the hive mind – Imagine you are in an off-leash area, a sports ground with cricket nets and you are practicing cricket with two young kids. There are people about 100m away playing with their 2 “pit-bull” style dogs. The dogs decide to run across the oval and join in to your cricket practice whilst the owners just stand there yelling at the dogs, not even bothering to chase after them. How do you as a parent react to this, not knowing what the dogs are like, except obviously deaf or disobedient? All I could do was try to shield my youngest by putting myself between him and the dog and yelling at it to go away. This sort of worked, but thankfully the other dog went to annoy the people next to us and the second one followed. Eventually the dogs responded and went back to their owners, but it left me remembering what happened to my eldest son a long time ago as a toddler. A supposedly timid pet chased him down and scratched him on the back of his leg, then jumped up onto me and bit the back of his leg whilst I was trying to hold him up as high as I could off the ground to safety. I learned later that someone else had pretty much trained the dog to chase and nip him on the legs through teasing, just for fun. Since then, any unknown mutt that approaches is enemy #1. Defending against one dog might be a difficult task enough, but two is way too much, when a 6 year old is involved.
Obviously in leash free areas, the dogs should be under the control of their owners. If the dogs don’t respond to “come here”, I’d say that is out of control.
Any ideas on what to do when the panic sets in as a four legged rabbit trap or two charge your way and you have little ones to protect?

In that particular situation I would say get the kids up on the nets out of harms way, and face up to the dogs with the cricket bat. Be prepared to beat them to death, and be prepared to be bitten while doing it.

This sort of thing has happened to me and my kids, and I’ve remonstrated with the owners of the dogs.

wildturkeycanoe wildturkeycanoe 7:12 pm 12 Sep 13

Question for the hive mind – Imagine you are in an off-leash area, a sports ground with cricket nets and you are practicing cricket with two young kids. There are people about 100m away playing with their 2 “pit-bull” style dogs. The dogs decide to run across the oval and join in to your cricket practice whilst the owners just stand there yelling at the dogs, not even bothering to chase after them. How do you as a parent react to this, not knowing what the dogs are like, except obviously deaf or disobedient? All I could do was try to shield my youngest by putting myself between him and the dog and yelling at it to go away. This sort of worked, but thankfully the other dog went to annoy the people next to us and the second one followed. Eventually the dogs responded and went back to their owners, but it left me remembering what happened to my eldest son a long time ago as a toddler. A supposedly timid pet chased him down and scratched him on the back of his leg, then jumped up onto me and bit the back of his leg whilst I was trying to hold him up as high as I could off the ground to safety. I learned later that someone else had pretty much trained the dog to chase and nip him on the legs through teasing, just for fun. Since then, any unknown mutt that approaches is enemy #1. Defending against one dog might be a difficult task enough, but two is way too much, when a 6 year old is involved.
Obviously in leash free areas, the dogs should be under the control of their owners. If the dogs don’t respond to “come here”, I’d say that is out of control.
Any ideas on what to do when the panic sets in as a four legged rabbit trap or two charge your way and you have little ones to protect?

midlife midlife 8:34 am 12 Sep 13

Police use a solid load in their ammo so there is a clean entry and possibly exit. The bullet does not do as much damage as a hollow head which deforms and causes more damage as it passes through increasing the chances of a fatal shot. In an animal it seems to require a hit to a fundamental part to kill them. Police are always at a disadvantage when it comes to fire power. Baddies seem to acquire the more effective equipment as they are not bound by rules.

MrBigEars MrBigEars 8:29 am 12 Sep 13

johnboy said :

Unless the victims had entered the dog’s yard the responsibility always comes down to the dog owner.

As a dog owner it’s something that keeps me awake at night.

I’m not sure if true or one of those stories, but I was told (by a dog club president) that you’d still be liable if someone entered your property legally (like the contractor who checks the power pole) but without your knowledge and your dog attacked them.

Spiral Spiral 3:35 pm 11 Sep 13

IrishPete said :

Given the police train to shoot humans, perhaps their aim wasn’t very accurate for the dog’s vital organs.

IP

I don’t know what hardware the Federal Police use, but many years ago I worked at a place in Victoria which had a sheep farm next door. One morning when we arrived we could see several sheep had been mauled by domestic dogs so we called the police.

They were surprisingly hard for him to kill with his pistol, often taking several shots. It didn’t help that while badly mauled they were still mobile and wouldn’t stay still for a clean shot through the head.

IrishPete IrishPete 3:11 pm 11 Sep 13

LSWCHP said :

Obviously I don’t know all the circumstances, but I’m surprised that the dog wasn’t killed.

Given the police train to shoot humans, perhaps their aim wasn’t very accurate for the dog’s vital organs.

IP

IrishPete IrishPete 3:10 pm 11 Sep 13

johnboy said :

As a dog owner it’s something that keeps me awake at night.

It barks all night?

IP

JazzyJess JazzyJess 2:31 pm 11 Sep 13

LSWCHP said :

Obviously I don’t know all the circumstances, but I’m surprised that the dog wasn’t killed.

Exactly. It seems common sense to seize a dog suspected of attacking people/other animals until the facts can be established.

1967 1967 1:45 pm 11 Sep 13

DrKoresh said :

Wasn’t a big bloody Dalmation by any chance?

“Around 5.55pm members from Belconnen Police Station responded to a report of a tan-coloured dog attacking a number of people.”
I don’t think that there are too many tan coloured dalmatians out there.

Oh yeah.
They roll in coal dust to make ’em selves look like labradors.
I seen ’em do it in the movies.

LSWCHP LSWCHP 1:00 pm 11 Sep 13

Obviously I don’t know all the circumstances, but I’m surprised that the dog wasn’t killed.

YeahBuddy YeahBuddy 10:53 am 11 Sep 13

*takes deep breath and jumps into the abyss*

How do any of you know that the woman didn’t rile up the dog? Maybe she hit it/kicked it/threw a rock at it and the animal has resorted to its natural instincts to protect itself?

Then again, maybe its just a sh!t dog with an equally sh!t owner.

    johnboy johnboy 11:23 am 11 Sep 13

    Unless the victims had entered the dog’s yard the responsibility always comes down to the dog owner.

    As a dog owner it’s something that keeps me awake at night.

Deref Deref 10:42 am 11 Sep 13

One can only hope that they then shot the owner.

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