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12 Canberrans to follow on Twitter in 2015

By Steven Bailey 14 July 2015 19

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Twitter is the social networking service where anything goes. Whether you’re a journalist tweeting the news in real time, a politician communicating with the public, or an everyday Joe Blow tweeting sweet nothings into the digital ether, Twitter is shaped by our politics and culture.

Compared to other cities, I’d say Canberra isn’t too mad about Twitter. If you’ve managed to attract 100 followers as an individual, I think you’re doing quite well. If you’ve smashed the 500 mark, you’re doing really well.

At the time of publication, the average number of followers attracted by Canberra’s MLAs is about 1,700.

This calculation excludes Andrew Barr, who is social media mad and has a relatively high number of followers at 8,157. At the other end of the spectrum we have the Canberra Liberal Party’s Andrew Wall on 577, and the inimitable Giulia Jones on 156.

The following is a list of twelve of Canberra’s most notable Twitter accounts. Some are noted for their social significance while others have been included for their unique style and sheer prolificacy.

12. Latika Bourke (@latikambourke)
Latika Bourke is one of the most prolific tweeters in Australia. Latika can quote a politician at a press conference verbatim almost before the politician has finished speaking. With about 90K followers, she appears telepathically connected to her Twitter account.
Bio: Fairfax Political Reporter at Parliament House Canberra. Author – From India with Love.
Followers: 90.5K

11. In the Taratory (@In_The_Taratory)
In The Taratory is a play on words of the tweeter’s name, Tara. Tara is well-known as a great advocate for Canberra. Her tweets explore all thing Canberra and perhaps one even senses the aspiration to be an MLA?
Bio: Reviewing everything and anything Canberra, ACT and surrounds have to offer. Views are my own.
Followers: 2392

10. Kylie Travers (@KylieTravers_au)
Kylie Travers is a remarkable Canberran. You name it, she’s done it. After experiencing violence and homelessness with her two young daughters, Travers is an unrelenting and inspiring advocate for her community.
Bio: Finalist Young Australian Of The Year ACT 2015. Author. Speaker. Writer. Blogger. CEO. Survivor of #DomesticViolence #Homelessness and more.
Followers: 4805

9. Rudi Lammers (@CPOACT)
Chief Police Officer Rudi Lammers has lived in Canberra for over 20 years. Lammers is a strong advocate against domestic violence, and he is always at the ready to keep Canberra  up-to-date with the latest drug busts and burglaries via the twittersphere.
Bio: Chief Police Officer for the ACT, Australian Federal Police
Followers: 4477

8. Richard Fox (@ThePoliticalACT)
ThePolitical ACT is run by journalist Richard Fox. Richard’s adroit political observations serve the community as a thorough one-stop-shop for all your political curiosities.
Bio: Everything ACT politics. Geeky I know.
Followers: 418

7. Mark Parton (@markparton)
Canberra’s dulcet voice of the morning, Mark Parton speaks with measure and experience.
Bio: Australian radio announcer. 2CC Canberra, father, columnist for City News, bike rider, kitchen head y estoy aprendiendo español.
Followers: 5268

6. Marcus Paul (@CanberraLive2CC)
Canberra’s colourful voice of the afternoon. Marcus Paul sticks it to the man and gives his fellow Canberrans a fair go.
Bio: Canberra Live with Marcus Paul | 3-6pm weekdays on @2CC
Followers: 916

5. Jason Roses (@RosesJason
Canberra identity Jason Roses is an inexhaustible source of commentary on popular culture. Somewhat of a scallywag; always entertaining.
Bio: TV Presenter, Talk Show Host, Travel Blogger, Real Estate Agent, Auctioneer. Followers: 8372

4. Alexandra Craig (@alexandracraig)
Alexandra Craig campaigns tirelessly for the welfare of animals in the ACT. As a self-confessed crazy cat lady, Alexandra is well-known for her kind heart and ingenuity when it comes to looking after neglected animals. She’s also a RiotACT contributor.
Bio: Collects vintage teacups. Stevie Nicks enthusiast. Crazy cat lady. Raises $ for feline health. @The_RiotACT contributor. Opinions are mine & therefore awesome.
Followers: 3839

3. Anna Johnston (@AnnaJ31)
With 17.3K followers, Anna Johnston is a well-known food and hospitality buff. She connects people through good food, booze, travel and hospitality.
Bio: Australian Food Blogger | Events Architect | Chef | Globetrotter | Beer Connoisseur | Coffee Blooded | Guru of Grub | Living the Dream!
Followers: 17.3k  

2. Kate Lundy (@KateLundy)
Former ACT Labor senator Kate Lundy recently posted an anti-Labor tweet: “Disappointing budget for motorists as ACT rego fees and pay parking increase.” If only our politicians would be so forthcoming with the truth when they were in office.
Bio: None
Followers: 23.9k

1. David Pocock (@pocockdavid
Popular Brumbies player David Pocock speaks his mind on Twitter. Pocock has a lot to say about issues of social justice and the environment.
Bio: Play a bit of rugby for the ACT Brumbies and Wallabies. Gweru, Zimbabwe to Brisbane to Perth to Canberra.
Followers: 81.7k

Which local Twitter users would you add to this list? 

What’s Your opinion?


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19 Responses to
12 Canberrans to follow on Twitter in 2015
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rosscoact 9:06 am 20 Jul 15

curmudgery said :

I’m with dungfungus on this.

As a means of communication it’s insulting. What can you say eloquently and persuasively in 140 characters? You can’t – so people just type something cryptic and provide links to elsewhere. They’re saying “I think this is important – now, you do the work.”

I say “If your issue is important, put a decent effort into it and I’ll engage with you. Otherwise, go to Hell you pretentious sod – don’t waste my time.”

And the amount of time people spend maintaining their ‘social presence’ is truly frightening – at the end of which they’ve achieved what?

It’s all so shallow.

As opposed to the deep and insightful discourse found on every street corner?

BTW, an online forum like this one is also social media.

Amense 6:41 pm 18 Jul 15

A few I can think of :
@TweetCanberra – James Tew good social engagement around Canberra
@renailemay – IT Journalist now Canberra Based, former Greens Senator advisor (Twitter Verified)
@phroghollow – Android enthusiast and Canberra based editor of Ausdroid.net (Twitter Verified)

Alexandra Craig 3:07 pm 17 Jul 15

Thanks for the mention, Steven! 🙂

I have been a bit slack on Twitter recently, I need to pick up my game and tweet more often.

I know many people think that Twitter is stupid or a waste of time, but a few years ago my tweets were spotted by someone influential and they gave me a job. A job that paid much more than the average 19 year old was getting. So it’s safe to say I’m a pretty big fan of Twitter and the opportunities it can provide to people.

dungfungus 6:26 pm 16 Jul 15

Evil_Kitten said :

dungfungus said :

Postalgeek said :

dungfungus said :

[
I don’t perceive a use for it – maybe later, but I can see the asset it has become for the examples you have provided.
It makes one wonder how society managed life before this social media revolution was unleashed on us.
Indeed, some of us manage quite well without it. It’s horses for courses.

I’m curious as to why you think a opinion on Riotact has validity while opinions on Twitter are drivel?

Apart from being restricted to 140 characters what’s the difference?

Fortunately we have moderators on the Riot Act although they do have some “no go areas” but this at least gives validity to our comments by way of editorial oversight.
The same can’t be said for some Twitter examples I have seen, especially from the types that promote that “F… Tony Abbott” tee shirt.
It’s open slather on Twitter which indicates no respect for others on that forum.

You don’t see those tweets though (unless you go looking for them). When you follow someone, you just see their tweets. Not the replies from randoms. It’s not a forum – it’s a fast moving information source from only the people you choose.

If you don’t want to see posts from types that promote F Tony Abbott tshirts, you don’t follow types that promote F Tony Abbott tshirts.

This link goes to the Twitter home page of the person who promotes the F Tony Abbott tshirts: https://twitter.com/clementine_ford
It appears she has over 38,000 followers (I assume that what 38.3K means?). Random indeed.

curmudgery 4:44 pm 16 Jul 15

I’m with dungfungus on this.

As a means of communication it’s insulting. What can you say eloquently and persuasively in 140 characters? You can’t – so people just type something cryptic and provide links to elsewhere. They’re saying “I think this is important – now, you do the work.”

I say “If your issue is important, put a decent effort into it and I’ll engage with you. Otherwise, go to Hell you pretentious sod – don’t waste my time.”

And the amount of time people spend maintaining their ‘social presence’ is truly frightening – at the end of which they’ve achieved what?

It’s all so shallow.

Evil_Kitten 4:31 pm 16 Jul 15

dungfungus said :

Postalgeek said :

dungfungus said :

[
I don’t perceive a use for it – maybe later, but I can see the asset it has become for the examples you have provided.
It makes one wonder how society managed life before this social media revolution was unleashed on us.
Indeed, some of us manage quite well without it. It’s horses for courses.

I’m curious as to why you think a opinion on Riotact has validity while opinions on Twitter are drivel?

Apart from being restricted to 140 characters what’s the difference?

Fortunately we have moderators on the Riot Act although they do have some “no go areas” but this at least gives validity to our comments by way of editorial oversight.
The same can’t be said for some Twitter examples I have seen, especially from the types that promote that “F… Tony Abbott” tee shirt.
It’s open slather on Twitter which indicates no respect for others on that forum.

You don’t see those tweets though (unless you go looking for them). When you follow someone, you just see their tweets. Not the replies from randoms. It’s not a forum – it’s a fast moving information source from only the people you choose.

If you don’t want to see posts from types that promote F Tony Abbott tshirts, you don’t follow types that promote F Tony Abbott tshirts.

dungfungus 9:45 pm 15 Jul 15

Postalgeek said :

dungfungus said :

[
I don’t perceive a use for it – maybe later, but I can see the asset it has become for the examples you have provided.
It makes one wonder how society managed life before this social media revolution was unleashed on us.
Indeed, some of us manage quite well without it. It’s horses for courses.

I’m curious as to why you think a opinion on Riotact has validity while opinions on Twitter are drivel?

Apart from being restricted to 140 characters what’s the difference?

Fortunately we have moderators on the Riot Act although they do have some “no go areas” but this at least gives validity to our comments by way of editorial oversight.
The same can’t be said for some Twitter examples I have seen, especially from the types that promote that “F… Tony Abbott” tee shirt.
It’s open slather on Twitter which indicates no respect for others on that forum.

Postalgeek 5:10 pm 15 Jul 15

dungfungus said :

[
I don’t perceive a use for it – maybe later, but I can see the asset it has become for the examples you have provided.
It makes one wonder how society managed life before this social media revolution was unleashed on us.
Indeed, some of us manage quite well without it. It’s horses for courses.

I’m curious as to why you think a opinion on Riotact has validity while opinions on Twitter are drivel? Apart from being restricted to 140 characters what’s the difference?

Ghettosmurf87 4:21 pm 15 Jul 15

dungfungus said :

Ghettosmurf87 said :

dungfungus said :

Is Twitter and Facebook the tools or are the users also tools?
Seriously, I appreciate what you have conveyed.
Twitter is obviously for the very young, immature and insecure and I think (hope) it will be part of a transition to adulthood for them.

It is not “obviously” for the very young, immature and insecure, that is simply how you perceive it without actually using it. Unlike many visually based social media platforms such as Instagram, Snapchat and even Facebook, twitter is far less about people posting pictures of themselves or telling their folowers what they are doing.

It’s real strength is as a live or current news aggregation service. Whether that is the news as provided by a number of commercial outlets such as newspapers, radio & television stations and organisations seeking attention, or that provided by journalists and people of interest, right down to local sports clubs and volunteer associations.

Twitter allows you to “follow” a large variety of news outlets. Whichever ones you choose in fact, and get a rolling stream of headlines/by-lines from those outlets from which you can then link to the full article in your browser. So instead of waiting for tomorrows newspaper to come out or going to a single website of a particular news service, you can instead get them all aggregated into one space in relatively real time as the stories are released.

Our local sporting team (cricket) also uses it to keep the various grades around Canberra, as well as family and friends, apprised of what is happening at other grades without having to have one person call 4 different teams each time they want an update, or sending annoying group texts. Instead the club provides a player or official in each grade with access to the clubs twitter account and they update these at regular intervals when possible. That way anyone wanting to know the score in 3rd grade just has to check the clubs twitter account. It has been a wonderful innovation at our club and means that when one grade finishes, they have an idea of what is happening elsewhere and can decide to go and watch if support is needed for a close game or the like.

Also very good for notification of ground closures/rain delays/wash outs etc

I don’t perceive a use for it – maybe later, but I can see the asset it has become for the examples you have provided.
It makes one wonder how society managed life before this social media revolution was unleashed on us.
Indeed, some of us manage quite well without it. It’s horses for courses.

People managed before batteries, electricity, mobile phones, the automobile, aeroplanes, the internet, email etc. That doesn’t make them any less useful.

Times change, as do the technologies available to us. Just because you managed in the past, it doesn’t mean new technology can’t assist you.

That’s also not to say that all new inventions are useful, however, just because you don’t use them, it’s no excuse to deride and denigrate those who do

dungfungus 3:12 pm 15 Jul 15

Ghettosmurf87 said :

dungfungus said :

Is Twitter and Facebook the tools or are the users also tools?
Seriously, I appreciate what you have conveyed.
Twitter is obviously for the very young, immature and insecure and I think (hope) it will be part of a transition to adulthood for them.

It is not “obviously” for the very young, immature and insecure, that is simply how you perceive it without actually using it. Unlike many visually based social media platforms such as Instagram, Snapchat and even Facebook, twitter is far less about people posting pictures of themselves or telling their folowers what they are doing.

It’s real strength is as a live or current news aggregation service. Whether that is the news as provided by a number of commercial outlets such as newspapers, radio & television stations and organisations seeking attention, or that provided by journalists and people of interest, right down to local sports clubs and volunteer associations.

Twitter allows you to “follow” a large variety of news outlets. Whichever ones you choose in fact, and get a rolling stream of headlines/by-lines from those outlets from which you can then link to the full article in your browser. So instead of waiting for tomorrows newspaper to come out or going to a single website of a particular news service, you can instead get them all aggregated into one space in relatively real time as the stories are released.

Our local sporting team (cricket) also uses it to keep the various grades around Canberra, as well as family and friends, apprised of what is happening at other grades without having to have one person call 4 different teams each time they want an update, or sending annoying group texts. Instead the club provides a player or official in each grade with access to the clubs twitter account and they update these at regular intervals when possible. That way anyone wanting to know the score in 3rd grade just has to check the clubs twitter account. It has been a wonderful innovation at our club and means that when one grade finishes, they have an idea of what is happening elsewhere and can decide to go and watch if support is needed for a close game or the like.

Also very good for notification of ground closures/rain delays/wash outs etc

I don’t perceive a use for it – maybe later, but I can see the asset it has become for the examples you have provided.
It makes one wonder how society managed life before this social media revolution was unleashed on us.
Indeed, some of us manage quite well without it. It’s horses for courses.

Ghettosmurf87 11:36 am 15 Jul 15

dungfungus said :

Is Twitter and Facebook the tools or are the users also tools?
Seriously, I appreciate what you have conveyed.
Twitter is obviously for the very young, immature and insecure and I think (hope) it will be part of a transition to adulthood for them.

It is not “obviously” for the very young, immature and insecure, that is simply how you perceive it without actually using it. Unlike many visually based social media platforms such as Instagram, Snapchat and even Facebook, twitter is far less about people posting pictures of themselves or telling their folowers what they are doing.

It’s real strength is as a live or current news aggregation service. Whether that is the news as provided by a number of commercial outlets such as newspapers, radio & television stations and organisations seeking attention, or that provided by journalists and people of interest, right down to local sports clubs and volunteer associations.

Twitter allows you to “follow” a large variety of news outlets. Whichever ones you choose in fact, and get a rolling stream of headlines/by-lines from those outlets from which you can then link to the full article in your browser. So instead of waiting for tomorrows newspaper to come out or going to a single website of a particular news service, you can instead get them all aggregated into one space in relatively real time as the stories are released.

Our local sporting team (cricket) also uses it to keep the various grades around Canberra, as well as family and friends, apprised of what is happening at other grades without having to have one person call 4 different teams each time they want an update, or sending annoying group texts. Instead the club provides a player or official in each grade with access to the clubs twitter account and they update these at regular intervals when possible. That way anyone wanting to know the score in 3rd grade just has to check the clubs twitter account. It has been a wonderful innovation at our club and means that when one grade finishes, they have an idea of what is happening elsewhere and can decide to go and watch if support is needed for a close game or the like.

Also very good for notification of ground closures/rain delays/wash outs etc

dungfungus 9:53 am 15 Jul 15

rosscoact said :

dungfungus said :

One word describes Twitter. Drivel.

Well it’s not the Daily Telegraph that’s for sure. It’s a natural reaction but don’t be afraid of what you don’t understand.

Twitter’s strength is in news land live events. A recent report showed that 63% of users get their news from Twitter and a similar percentage of Facebook users get their news from there. To be fair only 17% of adults are on Twitter which is marginally less than the 24% of people that buy newspapers and much less than the 66% of adults on Facebook.

But when you look at live events 59% of Twitter users keep up with live events as they happen as opposed to 0% of newspaper readers and 31% of FB users.

These things are just tools, neither inherently good or bad. There’s no need to embrace them but it is worthwhile understanding their benefits.

Is Twitter and Facebook the tools or are the users also tools?
Seriously, I appreciate what you have conveyed.
Twitter is obviously for the very young, immature and insecure and I think (hope) it will be part of a transition to adulthood for them.
Then again Kevin Rudd was the one who sent a selfie via Twitter of him cutting himself while shaving.
I’ll take this opportunity to remind you again that I only read the Daily Telegraph when I am at barber shop and I only then look at it if there is time after I read The Land. I get the Canberra Times daily and watch ABC TV almost exclusively. My tolerance of the left skewed media is high.

rosscoact 8:49 am 15 Jul 15

dungfungus said :

One word describes Twitter. Drivel.

Well it’s not the Daily Telegraph that’s for sure. It’s a natural reaction but don’t be afraid of what you don’t understand.

Twitter’s strength is in news land live events. A recent report showed that 63% of users get their news from Twitter and a similar percentage of Facebook users get their news from there. To be fair only 17% of adults are on Twitter which is marginally less than the 24% of people that buy newspapers and much less than the 66% of adults on Facebook.

But when you look at live events 59% of Twitter users keep up with live events as they happen as opposed to 0% of newspaper readers and 31% of FB users.

These things are just tools, neither inherently good or bad. There’s no need to embrace them but it is worthwhile understanding their benefits.

XO_VSOP 11:04 pm 14 Jul 15

richiedt said :

Not worried that you didn’t include my account but being an extremely active Twitter user I don’t understand why Jason Roses is included (never heard of him!) and not @PaulJurak for example. And if you’re gonna include Latika you should have Lenore Taylor in there and others like her.

No mention of Dragonista or Grogsgamut either – both phenominal #CBR Tweeps.

Jason Roses was on last years big brother and is one of Canberra and Australia’s top real estate agents with a very large network and following. The list is someone’s opinion.

creative_canberran 10:23 pm 14 Jul 15

richiedt said :

Not worried that you didn’t include my account but being an extremely active Twitter user I don’t understand why Jason Roses is included (never heard of him!) and not @PaulJurak for example. And if you’re gonna include Latika you should have Lenore Taylor in there and others like her.

No mention of Dragonista or Grogsgamut either – both phenominal #CBR Tweeps.

There’s no logic to this list, it’s just random. I wouldn’t think too much about it.
Don’t know why the CPO is on there though.

dungfungus 9:55 pm 14 Jul 15

richiedt said :

Not worried that you didn’t include my account but being an extremely active Twitter user I don’t understand why Jason Roses is included (never heard of him!) and not @PaulJurak for example. And if you’re gonna include Latika you should have Lenore Taylor in there and others like her.

No mention of Dragonista or Grogsgamut either – both phenominal #CBR Tweeps.

Thanks for confirming my earlier post.

richiedt 7:49 pm 14 Jul 15

Not worried that you didn’t include my account but being an extremely active Twitter user I don’t understand why Jason Roses is included (never heard of him!) and not @PaulJurak for example. And if you’re gonna include Latika you should have Lenore Taylor in there and others like her.

No mention of Dragonista or Grogsgamut either – both phenominal #CBR Tweeps.

dungfungus 9:50 am 14 Jul 15

One word describes Twitter. Drivel.

Dame Canberra 9:37 am 14 Jul 15

Elias Hallaj should be on this list for sure! https://twitter.com/Elias_Hallaj

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