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Showtime event scaled back as 40-degree days loom

By Charlotte Harper 8 February 2017 27

Showtime in the City

With temperatures in the capital forecast to reach as high as 40 degrees and above on Friday and Saturday, the first event cancellations are coming in.

Showtime in the City, a mini carnival scheduled for this weekend as a preview to the Canberra Show later this month, will now only run from 4.30pm till 9.30pm on Friday.

The event had been planned for the city centre on Friday evening and on Saturday but the Royal National Capital Agricultural Society has decided to cancel Saturday’s activities.

The event will still bring the best of the ActewAGL Royal Canberra Show to the city centre on Friday evening as planned, with popcorn, show bags and baby farm animals all on offer in Petrie Plaza.

The ActewAGL Royal Canberra Show launch and show bag launch will both take place on Friday.

Those who choose to drop by and take part in the carnival atmosphere on Friday are encouraged to prepare for the expected hot weather.

For information on staying safe in the heat visit www.health.act.gov.au/healthy-living/summer-safety/tips-beat-heat

Showtime in the City also provides the community with an opportunity to buy show tickets early at the ActewAGL Assist Store. The event is a partnership between the ACT Government, the Royal National Capital Agricultural Society and ActewAGL.Canberra_Sunset

The Canberra Show takes place at EPIC, from Friday 24 February to Sunday 26 February.


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Showtime event scaled back as 40-degree days loom
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mcs 12:58 pm 13 Feb 17

dungfungus said :

Thanks for the general comment but what about the specific situation with the solar farms in the ACT?

Your understanding is correct in regards to the local solar farms – under the feed in tariff arrangement, if they get wholesale prices above the FIT agreed price, then the difference comes back to the distributor, and ultimately passed back to ACT consumers.

http://www.environment.act.gov.au/energy/cleaner-energy/how-do-the-acts-renewable-energy-reverse-auctions-work

Thus, they don’t have the incentive to game the system per say, like the larger generators in other jurisdictions in particular have – but even without the FIT arrangements, they also don’t have anywhere near the scale to actively achieve it per say, in terms of electricity output.

dungfungus 10:26 pm 11 Feb 17

Light rail supporters please note.

This is the kind of weather that gives the rails sun kink and catenarys acute wire sag.

The tram has to stop running in other words.

Maya123 6:41 pm 11 Feb 17

dungfungus said :

Maya123 said :

wildturkeycanoe said :

Maya123 said :

After reading this, I wonder how people managed to survive before air conditioning?

When I was a young ‘un living at home with Mum n Dad, I hated summer. To a lesser extent I still do. We had no air conditioning and no wall insulation in a fibro house with a tin roof. My bedroom was on the sunset side of the house, so my summer nights were spent tossing and turning while my bedsheets soaked with sweat. A pedestal fan didn’t help much, as it just dried up any moisture on my skin and then blew the hot air around. Wet towels sometimes helped, but opening the window did nothing on nights when there was no breeze and it was still 30 degrees after dark.
I don’t miss those times at all and now I run the air con to get a good night’s sleep. I don’t know if some cultures are predisposed to suffering more in hot conditions, but I blame my European blood for hating anything above 23.
As for these recommended power saving tips, no thanks. I had the air con running to keep the house from warming up, as I made noodles on one hotplate, boiled eggs on another and made shrimp sauce on the third. If I pay for the power, I expect to be able to use it how I want to. It isn’t like we can just go outside and crank up the Weber bbq either, there is a total fire ban, duh! The government’s lack of foresight and planning should not dictate our families’ eating habits or comfort levels. If they can’t control how much power is generated because they sold it all off to money making organisations, all I can say is “We told you so!” This is what happens when you privatise essential services. Just imagine what will happen when they sell off hospitals, emergency services and telecommunications. Oh yeah, they already did the last one. See how well that worked out for us?

I lived for about 30 years in one of those little Narrabundah fibro houses, with uninsulated walls and minimal insulation in the ceiling, so I do know about hot houses (and cold houses in winter). Still, I managed by shutting up the house during the day and only opening up the windows late in the afternoon, when finally the inside temperature reached the same as outside. My bedroom too had a western wall with window. Amazing how shutting the blinds and closing the windows held off the worst of the heat…until at least mid to late afternoon. I used a fan. My present house is very efficient and I didn’t open the windows until almost midnight. As long as one is healthy, air conditioning isn’t necessary. Then if one does have air conditioning I think the suggested summer setting is about 25C. That should be comfortable for most, unless there is a health issue, or you are very overweight.
As for cooking, I have been bottling LOTS of fruit and that takes a lot of cooking. Still I haven’t needed air conditioning.
🙂 Trying to convince myself to finish off the fruit (apples) I have and bottle it today, because when the temperature cools off, I will be back to the ‘wilds’ to pick blackberries to bottle. Plus I will have some more plums soon to bottle. I try to process as many as possible at once to be more efficient with electricity.

Your grand parents probably did the fruit preserving without electricity – I lived in a house like yours but without electricity for 7 years. We had a chip heater for baths (no one else on this blog will be old enough to know what that was). All cooking was on a fuel stove and no heating other than that. Do you preserve quinces too?

We have become “wimps”. It’s time we all read some Henry Lawson short stories again to remind us how tough it was 150 years ago. There were few forums then to complain about anything.

As a child I lived in Cooma for three years and we had a chip heater. However, I never had to deal with it, as my parents took care of that. No, I don’t preserve quinces, as I don’t have a source for them. The few I have tried I haven’t liked though, but I would experiment with a few and see if they could be improved with processing. Figs improve with processing and cooked with porridge in the winter they are nice. Raw, not so nice.

dungfungus 6:09 pm 11 Feb 17

Maya123 said :

wildturkeycanoe said :

Maya123 said :

After reading this, I wonder how people managed to survive before air conditioning?

When I was a young ‘un living at home with Mum n Dad, I hated summer. To a lesser extent I still do. We had no air conditioning and no wall insulation in a fibro house with a tin roof. My bedroom was on the sunset side of the house, so my summer nights were spent tossing and turning while my bedsheets soaked with sweat. A pedestal fan didn’t help much, as it just dried up any moisture on my skin and then blew the hot air around. Wet towels sometimes helped, but opening the window did nothing on nights when there was no breeze and it was still 30 degrees after dark.
I don’t miss those times at all and now I run the air con to get a good night’s sleep. I don’t know if some cultures are predisposed to suffering more in hot conditions, but I blame my European blood for hating anything above 23.
As for these recommended power saving tips, no thanks. I had the air con running to keep the house from warming up, as I made noodles on one hotplate, boiled eggs on another and made shrimp sauce on the third. If I pay for the power, I expect to be able to use it how I want to. It isn’t like we can just go outside and crank up the Weber bbq either, there is a total fire ban, duh! The government’s lack of foresight and planning should not dictate our families’ eating habits or comfort levels. If they can’t control how much power is generated because they sold it all off to money making organisations, all I can say is “We told you so!” This is what happens when you privatise essential services. Just imagine what will happen when they sell off hospitals, emergency services and telecommunications. Oh yeah, they already did the last one. See how well that worked out for us?

I lived for about 30 years in one of those little Narrabundah fibro houses, with uninsulated walls and minimal insulation in the ceiling, so I do know about hot houses (and cold houses in winter). Still, I managed by shutting up the house during the day and only opening up the windows late in the afternoon, when finally the inside temperature reached the same as outside. My bedroom too had a western wall with window. Amazing how shutting the blinds and closing the windows held off the worst of the heat…until at least mid to late afternoon. I used a fan. My present house is very efficient and I didn’t open the windows until almost midnight. As long as one is healthy, air conditioning isn’t necessary. Then if one does have air conditioning I think the suggested summer setting is about 25C. That should be comfortable for most, unless there is a health issue, or you are very overweight.
As for cooking, I have been bottling LOTS of fruit and that takes a lot of cooking. Still I haven’t needed air conditioning.
🙂 Trying to convince myself to finish off the fruit (apples) I have and bottle it today, because when the temperature cools off, I will be back to the ‘wilds’ to pick blackberries to bottle. Plus I will have some more plums soon to bottle. I try to process as many as possible at once to be more efficient with electricity.

Your grand parents probably did the fruit preserving without electricity – I lived in a house like yours but without electricity for 7 years. We had a chip heater for baths (no one else on this blog will be old enough to know what that was). All cooking was on a fuel stove and no heating other than that. Do you preserve quinces too?

We have become “wimps”. It’s time we all read some Henry Lawson short stories again to remind us how tough it was 150 years ago. There were few forums then to complain about anything.

Maya123 12:41 pm 11 Feb 17

wildturkeycanoe said :

Maya123 said :

After reading this, I wonder how people managed to survive before air conditioning?

When I was a young ‘un living at home with Mum n Dad, I hated summer. To a lesser extent I still do. We had no air conditioning and no wall insulation in a fibro house with a tin roof. My bedroom was on the sunset side of the house, so my summer nights were spent tossing and turning while my bedsheets soaked with sweat. A pedestal fan didn’t help much, as it just dried up any moisture on my skin and then blew the hot air around. Wet towels sometimes helped, but opening the window did nothing on nights when there was no breeze and it was still 30 degrees after dark.
I don’t miss those times at all and now I run the air con to get a good night’s sleep. I don’t know if some cultures are predisposed to suffering more in hot conditions, but I blame my European blood for hating anything above 23.
As for these recommended power saving tips, no thanks. I had the air con running to keep the house from warming up, as I made noodles on one hotplate, boiled eggs on another and made shrimp sauce on the third. If I pay for the power, I expect to be able to use it how I want to. It isn’t like we can just go outside and crank up the Weber bbq either, there is a total fire ban, duh! The government’s lack of foresight and planning should not dictate our families’ eating habits or comfort levels. If they can’t control how much power is generated because they sold it all off to money making organisations, all I can say is “We told you so!” This is what happens when you privatise essential services. Just imagine what will happen when they sell off hospitals, emergency services and telecommunications. Oh yeah, they already did the last one. See how well that worked out for us?

I lived for about 30 years in one of those little Narrabundah fibro houses, with uninsulated walls and minimal insulation in the ceiling, so I do know about hot houses (and cold houses in winter). Still, I managed by shutting up the house during the day and only opening up the windows late in the afternoon, when finally the inside temperature reached the same as outside. My bedroom too had a western wall with window. Amazing how shutting the blinds and closing the windows held off the worst of the heat…until at least mid to late afternoon. I used a fan. My present house is very efficient and I didn’t open the windows until almost midnight. As long as one is healthy, air conditioning isn’t necessary. Then if one does have air conditioning I think the suggested summer setting is about 25C. That should be comfortable for most, unless there is a health issue, or you are very overweight.
As for cooking, I have been bottling LOTS of fruit and that takes a lot of cooking. Still I haven’t needed air conditioning.
🙂 Trying to convince myself to finish off the fruit (apples) I have and bottle it today, because when the temperature cools off, I will be back to the ‘wilds’ to pick blackberries to bottle. Plus I will have some more plums soon to bottle. I try to process as many as possible at once to be more efficient with electricity.

dungfungus 11:36 am 11 Feb 17

mcs said :

wildturkeycanoe said :

To avoid catastrophic failure, they may elect to shut down some suburbs for short periods to keep the backbone of the grid going, because without it nobody gets power. This is what I believe the rolling blackouts are designed to do.

That is certainly one reason for rolling blackouts in very hot weather – but usually the driving reason will be a simple shortage of supply compared with demand, which leads to ‘load shedding’ blackouts to ensure the system doesn’t overload, and lead to a bunch of the network problems you outlined.

Thanks to an unsustainable rate of immigration, demand for electricity in Australia is increasing at the rate of the needs of an additional 400,000 extra people every year. That’s equivalent to a city the size of Canberra.

Instead of building and commissioning new power stations and enjoying the proven supply security that gives we are closing them down.

Most people like to stay warm during winter and factories need the reliability of supply.
This was always available through coal but apparently we are now be told told get “a warm feeling” from saving the planet and this means demonising coal yet China is building another 200 coal fired power stations?

Ideology has created a planning fail on a grand scale.

wildturkeycanoe 10:49 pm 10 Feb 17

Maya123 said :

After reading this, I wonder how people managed to survive before air conditioning?

When I was a young ‘un living at home with Mum n Dad, I hated summer. To a lesser extent I still do. We had no air conditioning and no wall insulation in a fibro house with a tin roof. My bedroom was on the sunset side of the house, so my summer nights were spent tossing and turning while my bedsheets soaked with sweat. A pedestal fan didn’t help much, as it just dried up any moisture on my skin and then blew the hot air around. Wet towels sometimes helped, but opening the window did nothing on nights when there was no breeze and it was still 30 degrees after dark.
I don’t miss those times at all and now I run the air con to get a good night’s sleep. I don’t know if some cultures are predisposed to suffering more in hot conditions, but I blame my European blood for hating anything above 23.
As for these recommended power saving tips, no thanks. I had the air con running to keep the house from warming up, as I made noodles on one hotplate, boiled eggs on another and made shrimp sauce on the third. If I pay for the power, I expect to be able to use it how I want to. It isn’t like we can just go outside and crank up the Weber bbq either, there is a total fire ban, duh! The government’s lack of foresight and planning should not dictate our families’ eating habits or comfort levels. If they can’t control how much power is generated because they sold it all off to money making organisations, all I can say is “We told you so!” This is what happens when you privatise essential services. Just imagine what will happen when they sell off hospitals, emergency services and telecommunications. Oh yeah, they already did the last one. See how well that worked out for us?

dungfungus 9:30 pm 10 Feb 17

mcs said :

dungfungus said :

HenryBG said :

Masquara said :

Having issued a request for us all to minimise use of our air conditioners today, will Shane Rattenbury and the rest of the LA work with minimal airconditioning in their offices today? Seriously – how will we manage in the heat under 100% green power?

The issue isn’t green power, the issue is privatisation. Same thing happened in California after corrupt politicians sold off all the State’s power assets to private companies whose primary aim was not to deliver power to consumers, but to maximise shareholder profits.

Does anybody know if there is anything published on the internet that gives us access to generation stats (preferably in near-real-time) for all of Canberra’s new power-generating assets? You’d think those solar farms might be pumping out a bit of power today, wouldn’t you?

Am I correct in stating that all the new solar farms in the ACT are privately operated?

I don’t think their supply contract with the ACT government gives them any scope to “maximise profits” for their shareholders either so I don’t believe you can use the California experience as an example of what is happening here.

In eastern and southern Australia at present there is simply not enough power to meet demand which is a planning error by State governments.

Where is coal when you need it?

Privatisation is very much part of the issue – as it is the privatisation of the major generators (not the newer renewable sources per say), which have significant market power (in terms of their % of total output in the National Electricity Market (NEM), that is a leading contributory factor to many of the negative outcomes being seen – in particular of course the South Australian blackouts.

These firms have significant ability to ‘withhold’ power, even in times of relatively high demand, or shortage of supply due to other reasons – in the pursuit of spiking the spot prices and maximising the profits. The NEM framework doesn’t adequately deal with this at the moment. Whereas when they were publicly owned their ultimate commitment was to provide power to the grid, now as privatised assets, the major commitment is to maximise profits, irrespective of the outcome on the broader electricity grid.

This ability to ‘game’ the system, combined with hot weather and high levels of demand is what leads us to a point where demand may outstrip supply. It is not that there is not necessarily sufficient generating capacity available – although one could argue more ‘backup’ generation sources would be helpful to help reduce the likelihood of instances where supply can’t meet demand across the NEM.

Thanks for the general comment but what about the specific situation with the solar farms in the ACT?

kaitaz 8:44 pm 10 Feb 17

I have close ties with individuals associated with hosting this Showtime in the City event.

Whilst the public has been informed of the difference in previously advertised hours, some of the main stakeholders had no idea of the changes to event timing.

They turned up as originally organised and waited in the heat for the event organisers to show up and advise of the restricted hours due to heat.

While waiting with many bags of melting ice for snow cones to set up for not only providing frozen treats, but to advertise other aspects of the RNCAS Canberra show, they were not made aware of changed event times and were becoming increasingly frustrated waiting in the heat for organisers to meet them.

All is well now, however a lack of effective communication has forced staff facilitating this event to unknowingly wait in todays heat for organisers to tell them the hours had been changed.

So much importance is placed on public knowledge but why is it not a common courtesy for advertisers to inform stakeholders of changes to programming?

I agree wholeheartedly with conveying all possible knowledge to the public regarding previously advertised events, however the same conveyance of knowledge should be extended as a common courtesy to all stakeholders.

Not cool forcing facilitating staff to suffer in the same heat as they advertised for the public to stay away from.

mcs 4:47 pm 10 Feb 17

wildturkeycanoe said :

To avoid catastrophic failure, they may elect to shut down some suburbs for short periods to keep the backbone of the grid going, because without it nobody gets power. This is what I believe the rolling blackouts are designed to do.

That is certainly one reason for rolling blackouts in very hot weather – but usually the driving reason will be a simple shortage of supply compared with demand, which leads to ‘load shedding’ blackouts to ensure the system doesn’t overload, and lead to a bunch of the network problems you outlined.

mcs 4:45 pm 10 Feb 17

dungfungus said :

HenryBG said :

Masquara said :

Having issued a request for us all to minimise use of our air conditioners today, will Shane Rattenbury and the rest of the LA work with minimal airconditioning in their offices today? Seriously – how will we manage in the heat under 100% green power?

The issue isn’t green power, the issue is privatisation. Same thing happened in California after corrupt politicians sold off all the State’s power assets to private companies whose primary aim was not to deliver power to consumers, but to maximise shareholder profits.

Does anybody know if there is anything published on the internet that gives us access to generation stats (preferably in near-real-time) for all of Canberra’s new power-generating assets? You’d think those solar farms might be pumping out a bit of power today, wouldn’t you?

Am I correct in stating that all the new solar farms in the ACT are privately operated?

I don’t think their supply contract with the ACT government gives them any scope to “maximise profits” for their shareholders either so I don’t believe you can use the California experience as an example of what is happening here.

In eastern and southern Australia at present there is simply not enough power to meet demand which is a planning error by State governments.

Where is coal when you need it?

Privatisation is very much part of the issue – as it is the privatisation of the major generators (not the newer renewable sources per say), which have significant market power (in terms of their % of total output in the National Electricity Market (NEM), that is a leading contributory factor to many of the negative outcomes being seen – in particular of course the South Australian blackouts.

These firms have significant ability to ‘withhold’ power, even in times of relatively high demand, or shortage of supply due to other reasons – in the pursuit of spiking the spot prices and maximising the profits. The NEM framework doesn’t adequately deal with this at the moment. Whereas when they were publicly owned their ultimate commitment was to provide power to the grid, now as privatised assets, the major commitment is to maximise profits, irrespective of the outcome on the broader electricity grid.

This ability to ‘game’ the system, combined with hot weather and high levels of demand is what leads us to a point where demand may outstrip supply. It is not that there is not necessarily sufficient generating capacity available – although one could argue more ‘backup’ generation sources would be helpful to help reduce the likelihood of instances where supply can’t meet demand across the NEM.

Maya123 4:26 pm 10 Feb 17

After reading this, I wonder how people managed to survive before air conditioning? They did. Some of us still do. Most of the blinds (honey combed) in my house are closed. The windows are shut to stop the hot outside air from coming in. Late tonight I will open windows and the roof vents to let in cool air; then close them all again tomorrow morning. However, it is surprising how many people have their blinds open on a hot day and, worse, their windows open, letting in he hotter air outside, because they “want the moving air to cool them”. Meanwhile, their house gets hotter and hotter. If you want moving air, close the windows to keep the hotter air outside and turn on a fan.

Maryann Mussared 2:08 pm 10 Feb 17

This flashed up on someone else’s Facebook page last night. I thought they had everyone’s mobiles to send such important info…. The people who work for the Government need to get more organised in distributing such essential information.
http://www.act.gov.au/call-to-reduce-electricity-usage-on-friday-10-february-2017

wildturkeycanoe 1:51 pm 10 Feb 17

HenryBG said :

Does anybody know if there is anything published on the internet that gives us access to generation stats (preferably in near-real-time) for all of Canberra’s new power-generating assets? You’d think those solar farms might be pumping out a bit of power today, wouldn’t you?

The problem isn’t about how much the solar farms can produce but how to get the power across the region. As temperatures climb and power usage follows, the flow of current from power generation plants to homes also increases. This means that all the transformers which convert the high voltages down to a usable 240 volts, get close to their capacity due to the demand. If one transformer overheats and shuts down, the demand is then transferred through a different set of power lines and a different transformer. If that one is also close to exceeding its limit, then it will shut down to avoid disaster. It may go up the food chain, dropping power to extra high voltage transmission and larger areas or simply blacking out a couple of suburbs. This may also cause a cascading effect if the extra load works its way up the ladder to larger switching yards and interstate power transmission. Restoration might not be possible until the mineral oil in the transformers cools down, but if power from upstream sources has also tripped out, how would you run any external cooling fans? [I’m not a HV expert on this, so maybe someone from ACTEW could correct me if I am wrong].
To avoid catastrophic failure, they may elect to shut down some suburbs for short periods to keep the backbone of the grid going, because without it nobody gets power. This is what I believe the rolling blackouts are designed to do.
Well, that went a bit off topic didn’t it. For anyone who dares to brave the heat at the show, please drink plenty of water and stay in the shade as much as possible. It’s a scorcher!

sputnik 1:16 pm 10 Feb 17

HenryBG said :

Does anybody know if there is anything published on the internet that gives us access to generation stats (preferably in near-real-time) for all of Canberra’s new power-generating assets? You’d think those solar farms might be pumping out a bit of power today, wouldn’t you?

http://pv-map.apvi.org.au/live
Has some data on live generation.

dungfungus 1:05 pm 10 Feb 17

HenryBG said :

Masquara said :

Having issued a request for us all to minimise use of our air conditioners today, will Shane Rattenbury and the rest of the LA work with minimal airconditioning in their offices today? Seriously – how will we manage in the heat under 100% green power?

The issue isn’t green power, the issue is privatisation. Same thing happened in California after corrupt politicians sold off all the State’s power assets to private companies whose primary aim was not to deliver power to consumers, but to maximise shareholder profits.

Does anybody know if there is anything published on the internet that gives us access to generation stats (preferably in near-real-time) for all of Canberra’s new power-generating assets? You’d think those solar farms might be pumping out a bit of power today, wouldn’t you?

Am I correct in stating that all the new solar farms in the ACT are privately operated?

I don’t think their supply contract with the ACT government gives them any scope to “maximise profits” for their shareholders either so I don’t believe you can use the California experience as an example of what is happening here.

In eastern and southern Australia at present there is simply not enough power to meet demand which is a planning error by State governments.

Where is coal when you need it?

dungfungus 12:57 pm 10 Feb 17

crackerpants said :

dungfungus said :

Masquara said :

Having issued a request for us all to minimise use of our air conditioners today, will Shane Rattenbury and the rest of the LA work with minimal airconditioning in their offices today? Seriously – how will we manage in the heat under 100% green power?

I am unaware of this request – can you supply link please?

http://www.canberratimes.com.au/act-news/canberrans-could-face-blackouts-in-act-urged-to-reduce-electricity-usage-20170209-gu9pnd.html

The message was passed on to us at work (“green” building with approx 3000 staff) as well – simple measures like closing blinds, turning off anything we’re not using etc. I think it’s a reasonable, commonsense request (and much better than being asked not to use the toilets after a sewage flood in the same building earlier this week).

Thanks for that – missed that in the CT this morning.

I chuckled at this in your post: “We’re not talking [turning off] air conditioning here, people need to stay cool,” he told the ABC on Friday morning.”

We are all “cool” Shane, this is hipster central.

Also, I note the patronising tips mostly refer to “during the day”.

Hello? Does he know how bleeding hot it gets at night and really, night time is when we lose all that solar power and if it is calm that means no turbines so we are going to be up the (dry) creek without a paddle.

I expect the next announcement will be “go to your homes and await instructions”.

HenryBG 12:09 pm 10 Feb 17

Masquara said :

Having issued a request for us all to minimise use of our air conditioners today, will Shane Rattenbury and the rest of the LA work with minimal airconditioning in their offices today? Seriously – how will we manage in the heat under 100% green power?

The issue isn’t green power, the issue is privatisation. Same thing happened in California after corrupt politicians sold off all the State’s power assets to private companies whose primary aim was not to deliver power to consumers, but to maximise shareholder profits.

Does anybody know if there is anything published on the internet that gives us access to generation stats (preferably in near-real-time) for all of Canberra’s new power-generating assets? You’d think those solar farms might be pumping out a bit of power today, wouldn’t you?

crackerpants 11:54 am 10 Feb 17

dungfungus said :

Masquara said :

Having issued a request for us all to minimise use of our air conditioners today, will Shane Rattenbury and the rest of the LA work with minimal airconditioning in their offices today? Seriously – how will we manage in the heat under 100% green power?

I am unaware of this request – can you supply link please?

http://www.canberratimes.com.au/act-news/canberrans-could-face-blackouts-in-act-urged-to-reduce-electricity-usage-20170209-gu9pnd.html

The message was passed on to us at work (“green” building with approx 3000 staff) as well – simple measures like closing blinds, turning off anything we’re not using etc. I think it’s a reasonable, commonsense request (and much better than being asked not to use the toilets after a sewage flood in the same building earlier this week).

dungfungus 11:09 am 10 Feb 17

Masquara said :

Having issued a request for us all to minimise use of our air conditioners today, will Shane Rattenbury and the rest of the LA work with minimal airconditioning in their offices today? Seriously – how will we manage in the heat under 100% green power?

I am unaware of this request – can you supply link please?

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