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Home loans made clear

Showtime event scaled back as 40-degree days loom

By Charlotte Harper 8 February 2017 27

Showtime in the City

With temperatures in the capital forecast to reach as high as 40 degrees and above on Friday and Saturday, the first event cancellations are coming in.

Showtime in the City, a mini carnival scheduled for this weekend as a preview to the Canberra Show later this month, will now only run from 4.30pm till 9.30pm on Friday.

The event had been planned for the city centre on Friday evening and on Saturday but the Royal National Capital Agricultural Society has decided to cancel Saturday’s activities.

The event will still bring the best of the ActewAGL Royal Canberra Show to the city centre on Friday evening as planned, with popcorn, show bags and baby farm animals all on offer in Petrie Plaza.

The ActewAGL Royal Canberra Show launch and show bag launch will both take place on Friday.

Those who choose to drop by and take part in the carnival atmosphere on Friday are encouraged to prepare for the expected hot weather.

For information on staying safe in the heat visit www.health.act.gov.au/healthy-living/summer-safety/tips-beat-heat

Showtime in the City also provides the community with an opportunity to buy show tickets early at the ActewAGL Assist Store. The event is a partnership between the ACT Government, the Royal National Capital Agricultural Society and ActewAGL.Canberra_Sunset

The Canberra Show takes place at EPIC, from Friday 24 February to Sunday 26 February.


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Showtime event scaled back as 40-degree days loom
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mcs 12:58 pm 13 Feb 17

dungfungus said :

Thanks for the general comment but what about the specific situation with the solar farms in the ACT?

Your understanding is correct in regards to the local solar farms – under the feed in tariff arrangement, if they get wholesale prices above the FIT agreed price, then the difference comes back to the distributor, and ultimately passed back to ACT consumers.

http://www.environment.act.gov.au/energy/cleaner-energy/how-do-the-acts-renewable-energy-reverse-auctions-work

Thus, they don’t have the incentive to game the system per say, like the larger generators in other jurisdictions in particular have – but even without the FIT arrangements, they also don’t have anywhere near the scale to actively achieve it per say, in terms of electricity output.

dungfungus 10:26 pm 11 Feb 17

Light rail supporters please note.

This is the kind of weather that gives the rails sun kink and catenarys acute wire sag.

The tram has to stop running in other words.

Maya123 6:41 pm 11 Feb 17

dungfungus said :

Maya123 said :

wildturkeycanoe said :

Maya123 said :

After reading this, I wonder how people managed to survive before air conditioning?

When I was a young ‘un living at home with Mum n Dad, I hated summer. To a lesser extent I still do. We had no air conditioning and no wall insulation in a fibro house with a tin roof. My bedroom was on the sunset side of the house, so my summer nights were spent tossing and turning while my bedsheets soaked with sweat. A pedestal fan didn’t help much, as it just dried up any moisture on my skin and then blew the hot air around. Wet towels sometimes helped, but opening the window did nothing on nights when there was no breeze and it was still 30 degrees after dark.
I don’t miss those times at all and now I run the air con to get a good night’s sleep. I don’t know if some cultures are predisposed to suffering more in hot conditions, but I blame my European blood for hating anything above 23.
As for these recommended power saving tips, no thanks. I had the air con running to keep the house from warming up, as I made noodles on one hotplate, boiled eggs on another and made shrimp sauce on the third. If I pay for the power, I expect to be able to use it how I want to. It isn’t like we can just go outside and crank up the Weber bbq either, there is a total fire ban, duh! The government’s lack of foresight and planning should not dictate our families’ eating habits or comfort levels. If they can’t control how much power is generated because they sold it all off to money making organisations, all I can say is “We told you so!” This is what happens when you privatise essential services. Just imagine what will happen when they sell off hospitals, emergency services and telecommunications. Oh yeah, they already did the last one. See how well that worked out for us?

I lived for about 30 years in one of those little Narrabundah fibro houses, with uninsulated walls and minimal insulation in the ceiling, so I do know about hot houses (and cold houses in winter). Still, I managed by shutting up the house during the day and only opening up the windows late in the afternoon, when finally the inside temperature reached the same as outside. My bedroom too had a western wall with window. Amazing how shutting the blinds and closing the windows held off the worst of the heat…until at least mid to late afternoon. I used a fan. My present house is very efficient and I didn’t open the windows until almost midnight. As long as one is healthy, air conditioning isn’t necessary. Then if one does have air conditioning I think the suggested summer setting is about 25C. That should be comfortable for most, unless there is a health issue, or you are very overweight.
As for cooking, I have been bottling LOTS of fruit and that takes a lot of cooking. Still I haven’t needed air conditioning.
🙂 Trying to convince myself to finish off the fruit (apples) I have and bottle it today, because when the temperature cools off, I will be back to the ‘wilds’ to pick blackberries to bottle. Plus I will have some more plums soon to bottle. I try to process as many as possible at once to be more efficient with electricity.

Your grand parents probably did the fruit preserving without electricity – I lived in a house like yours but without electricity for 7 years. We had a chip heater for baths (no one else on this blog will be old enough to know what that was). All cooking was on a fuel stove and no heating other than that. Do you preserve quinces too?

We have become “wimps”. It’s time we all read some Henry Lawson short stories again to remind us how tough it was 150 years ago. There were few forums then to complain about anything.

As a child I lived in Cooma for three years and we had a chip heater. However, I never had to deal with it, as my parents took care of that. No, I don’t preserve quinces, as I don’t have a source for them. The few I have tried I haven’t liked though, but I would experiment with a few and see if they could be improved with processing. Figs improve with processing and cooked with porridge in the winter they are nice. Raw, not so nice.

dungfungus 6:09 pm 11 Feb 17

Maya123 said :

wildturkeycanoe said :

Maya123 said :

After reading this, I wonder how people managed to survive before air conditioning?

When I was a young ‘un living at home with Mum n Dad, I hated summer. To a lesser extent I still do. We had no air conditioning and no wall insulation in a fibro house with a tin roof. My bedroom was on the sunset side of the house, so my summer nights were spent tossing and turning while my bedsheets soaked with sweat. A pedestal fan didn’t help much, as it just dried up any moisture on my skin and then blew the hot air around. Wet towels sometimes helped, but opening the window did nothing on nights when there was no breeze and it was still 30 degrees after dark.
I don’t miss those times at all and now I run the air con to get a good night’s sleep. I don’t know if some cultures are predisposed to suffering more in hot conditions, but I blame my European blood for hating anything above 23.
As for these recommended power saving tips, no thanks. I had the air con running to keep the house from warming up, as I made noodles on one hotplate, boiled eggs on another and made shrimp sauce on the third. If I pay for the power, I expect to be able to use it how I want to. It isn’t like we can just go outside and crank up the Weber bbq either, there is a total fire ban, duh! The government’s lack of foresight and planning should not dictate our families’ eating habits or comfort levels. If they can’t control how much power is generated because they sold it all off to money making organisations, all I can say is “We told you so!” This is what happens when you privatise essential services. Just imagine what will happen when they sell off hospitals, emergency services and telecommunications. Oh yeah, they already did the last one. See how well that worked out for us?

I lived for about 30 years in one of those little Narrabundah fibro houses, with uninsulated walls and minimal insulation in the ceiling, so I do know about hot houses (and cold houses in winter). Still, I managed by shutting up the house during the day and only opening up the windows late in the afternoon, when finally the inside temperature reached the same as outside. My bedroom too had a western wall with window. Amazing how shutting the blinds and closing the windows held off the worst of the heat…until at least mid to late afternoon. I used a fan. My present house is very efficient and I didn’t open the windows until almost midnight. As long as one is healthy, air conditioning isn’t necessary. Then if one does have air conditioning I think the suggested summer setting is about 25C. That should be comfortable for most, unless there is a health issue, or you are very overweight.
As for cooking, I have been bottling LOTS of fruit and that takes a lot of cooking. Still I haven’t needed air conditioning.
🙂 Trying to convince myself to finish off the fruit (apples) I have and bottle it today, because when the temperature cools off, I will be back to the ‘wilds’ to pick blackberries to bottle. Plus I will have some more plums soon to bottle. I try to process as many as possible at once to be more efficient with electricity.

Your grand parents probably did the fruit preserving without electricity – I lived in a house like yours but without electricity for 7 years. We had a chip heater for baths (no one else on this blog will be old enough to know what that was). All cooking was on a fuel stove and no heating other than that. Do you preserve quinces too?

We have become “wimps”. It’s time we all read some Henry Lawson short stories again to remind us how tough it was 150 years ago. There were few forums then to complain about anything.

Maya123 12:41 pm 11 Feb 17

wildturkeycanoe said :

Maya123 said :

After reading this, I wonder how people managed to survive before air conditioning?

When I was a young ‘un living at home with Mum n Dad, I hated summer. To a lesser extent I still do. We had no air conditioning and no wall insulation in a fibro house with a tin roof. My bedroom was on the sunset side of the house, so my summer nights were spent tossing and turning while my bedsheets soaked with sweat. A pedestal fan didn’t help much, as it just dried up any moisture on my skin and then blew the hot air around. Wet towels sometimes helped, but opening the window did nothing on nights when there was no breeze and it was still 30 degrees after dark.
I don’t miss those times at all and now I run the air con to get a good night’s sleep. I don’t know if some cultures are predisposed to suffering more in hot conditions, but I blame my European blood for hating anything above 23.
As for these recommended power saving tips, no thanks. I had the air con running to keep the house from warming up, as I made noodles on one hotplate, boiled eggs on another and made shrimp sauce on the third. If I pay for the power, I expect to be able to use it how I want to. It isn’t like we can just go outside and crank up the Weber bbq either, there is a total fire ban, duh! The government’s lack of foresight and planning should not dictate our families’ eating habits or comfort levels. If they can’t control how much power is generated because they sold it all off to money making organisations, all I can say is “We told you so!” This is what happens when you privatise essential services. Just imagine what will happen when they sell off hospitals, emergency services and telecommunications. Oh yeah, they already did the last one. See how well that worked out for us?

I lived for about 30 years in one of those little Narrabundah fibro houses, with uninsulated walls and minimal insulation in the ceiling, so I do know about hot houses (and cold houses in winter). Still, I managed by shutting up the house during the day and only opening up the windows late in the afternoon, when finally the inside temperature reached the same as outside. My bedroom too had a western wall with window. Amazing how shutting the blinds and closing the windows held off the worst of the heat…until at least mid to late afternoon. I used a fan. My present house is very efficient and I didn’t open the windows until almost midnight. As long as one is healthy, air conditioning isn’t necessary. Then if one does have air conditioning I think the suggested summer setting is about 25C. That should be comfortable for most, unless there is a health issue, or you are very overweight.
As for cooking, I have been bottling LOTS of fruit and that takes a lot of cooking. Still I haven’t needed air conditioning.
🙂 Trying to convince myself to finish off the fruit (apples) I have and bottle it today, because when the temperature cools off, I will be back to the ‘wilds’ to pick blackberries to bottle. Plus I will have some more plums soon to bottle. I try to process as many as possible at once to be more efficient with electricity.

dungfungus 11:36 am 11 Feb 17

mcs said :

wildturkeycanoe said :

To avoid catastrophic failure, they may elect to shut down some suburbs for short periods to keep the backbone of the grid going, because without it nobody gets power. This is what I believe the rolling blackouts are designed to do.

That is certainly one reason for rolling blackouts in very hot weather – but usually the driving reason will be a simple shortage of supply compared with demand, which leads to ‘load shedding’ blackouts to ensure the system doesn’t overload, and lead to a bunch of the network problems you outlined.

Thanks to an unsustainable rate of immigration, demand for electricity in Australia is increasing at the rate of the needs of an additional 400,000 extra people every year. That’s equivalent to a city the size of Canberra.

Instead of building and commissioning new power stations and enjoying the proven supply security that gives we are closing them down.

Most people like to stay warm during winter and factories need the reliability of supply.
This was always available through coal but apparently we are now be told told get “a warm feeling” from saving the planet and this means demonising coal yet China is building another 200 coal fired power stations?

Ideology has created a planning fail on a grand scale.

wildturkeycanoe 10:49 pm 10 Feb 17

Maya123 said :

After reading this, I wonder how people managed to survive before air conditioning?

When I was a young ‘un living at home with Mum n Dad, I hated summer. To a lesser extent I still do. We had no air conditioning and no wall insulation in a fibro house with a tin roof. My bedroom was on the sunset side of the house, so my summer nights were spent tossing and turning while my bedsheets soaked with sweat. A pedestal fan didn’t help much, as it just dried up any moisture on my skin and then blew the hot air around. Wet towels sometimes helped, but opening the window did nothing on nights when there was no breeze and it was still 30 degrees after dark.
I don’t miss those times at all and now I run the air con to get a good night’s sleep. I don’t know if some cultures are predisposed to suffering more in hot conditions, but I blame my European blood for hating anything above 23.
As for these recommended power saving tips, no thanks. I had the air con running to keep the house from warming up, as I made noodles on one hotplate, boiled eggs on another and made shrimp sauce on the third. If I pay for the power, I expect to be able to use it how I want to. It isn’t like we can just go outside and crank up the Weber bbq either, there is a total fire ban, duh! The government’s lack of foresight and planning should not dictate our families’ eating habits or comfort levels. If they can’t control how much power is generated because they sold it all off to money making organisations, all I can say is “We told you so!” This is what happens when you privatise essential services. Just imagine what will happen when they sell off hospitals, emergency services and telecommunications. Oh yeah, they already did the last one. See how well that worked out for us?

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